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Systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies to understand the prevalence of restless legs syndrome in multiple sclerosis: an update.
Sleep Med. 2018 10; 50:97-104.SM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is related to the demyelination of intracranial nerves at multiple sites, while restless legs syndrome (RLS) appears to be caused by dysfunction of the dopaminergic system. Since RLS prevalence is higher among MS patients than in the general population, we carried out an updated meta-analysis to understand whether the two diseases might be associated.

METHOD

Web of Science, PubMed, Embase, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, and SinoMed databases were searched for observational and case-controlled studies of RLS prevalence in MS. Eligible studies were meta-analyzed using Stata 12.0.

RESULTS

Pooled RLS prevalence among MS patients of various ethnicities was 26%, and prevalence was lower in Asia (20%) than outside Asia (27%). Prevalence was higher among cross-sectional studies (30%) than among case-control studies (23%). RLS prevalence was higher among female than male MS patients (26% vs. 17%), and it was higher among MS patients than among healthy controls (OR 3.96, 95%CI 3.29-4.77, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSION

Our meta-analysis updates the most recent meta-analysis in 2013 and provides perhaps the first reliable pooled estimate of RLS prevalence in MS. The available evidence strongly suggests that RLS risk is higher among MS patients than healthy controls.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 37 Guo Xue Xiang, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, 610041, PR China. Electronic address: npp529@126.com.Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 37 Guo Xue Xiang, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, 610041, PR China. Electronic address: hufayun2006@163.com.Department of Neurology, Seventh People's Hospital of Chengdu, No. 1, Twelve Middle Street, Wuhou District, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, 610041, PR China. Electronic address: 514562706@qq.com.Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 37 Guo Xue Xiang, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, 610041, PR China. Electronic address: 3523443731@qq.com.Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 37 Guo Xue Xiang, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, 610041, PR China. Electronic address: 1021996311@qq.com.Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 37 Guo Xue Xiang, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, 610041, PR China. Electronic address: 849074084@qq.com.Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 37 Guo Xue Xiang, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, 610041, PR China. Electronic address: neuroanr@163.com.Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 37 Guo Xue Xiang, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, 610041, PR China. Electronic address: 625651047@qq.com.Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 37 Guo Xue Xiang, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, 610041, PR China. Electronic address: 838286121@qq.com.Department of Geriatric Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, 295 Xi Change Road, Kunming, Yunnan Province, 650032, PR China. Electronic address: yxldoc11@163.com.Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 37 Guo Xue Xiang, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, 610041, PR China. Electronic address: neuroxym999@163.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30025277

Citation

Ning, Pingping, et al. "Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Observational Studies to Understand the Prevalence of Restless Legs Syndrome in Multiple Sclerosis: an Update." Sleep Medicine, vol. 50, 2018, pp. 97-104.
Ning P, Hu F, Yang B, et al. Systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies to understand the prevalence of restless legs syndrome in multiple sclerosis: an update. Sleep Med. 2018;50:97-104.
Ning, P., Hu, F., Yang, B., Shen, Q., Zhao, Q., Huang, H., An, R., Chen, Y., Wang, H., Yang, X., & Xu, Y. (2018). Systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies to understand the prevalence of restless legs syndrome in multiple sclerosis: an update. Sleep Medicine, 50, 97-104. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2018.05.039
Ning P, et al. Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Observational Studies to Understand the Prevalence of Restless Legs Syndrome in Multiple Sclerosis: an Update. Sleep Med. 2018;50:97-104. PubMed PMID: 30025277.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies to understand the prevalence of restless legs syndrome in multiple sclerosis: an update. AU - Ning,Pingping, AU - Hu,Fayun, AU - Yang,Baiyuan, AU - Shen,Qiuyan, AU - Zhao,Quanzhen, AU - Huang,Hongyan, AU - An,Ran, AU - Chen,Yalan, AU - Wang,Hui, AU - Yang,Xinglong, AU - Xu,Yanming, Y1 - 2018/06/20/ PY - 2018/01/21/received PY - 2018/05/17/revised PY - 2018/05/19/accepted PY - 2018/7/20/pubmed PY - 2019/11/5/medline PY - 2018/7/20/entrez KW - Multiple sclerosis KW - Prevalence KW - Restless legs syndrome SP - 97 EP - 104 JF - Sleep medicine JO - Sleep Med VL - 50 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is related to the demyelination of intracranial nerves at multiple sites, while restless legs syndrome (RLS) appears to be caused by dysfunction of the dopaminergic system. Since RLS prevalence is higher among MS patients than in the general population, we carried out an updated meta-analysis to understand whether the two diseases might be associated. METHOD: Web of Science, PubMed, Embase, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, and SinoMed databases were searched for observational and case-controlled studies of RLS prevalence in MS. Eligible studies were meta-analyzed using Stata 12.0. RESULTS: Pooled RLS prevalence among MS patients of various ethnicities was 26%, and prevalence was lower in Asia (20%) than outside Asia (27%). Prevalence was higher among cross-sectional studies (30%) than among case-control studies (23%). RLS prevalence was higher among female than male MS patients (26% vs. 17%), and it was higher among MS patients than among healthy controls (OR 3.96, 95%CI 3.29-4.77, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Our meta-analysis updates the most recent meta-analysis in 2013 and provides perhaps the first reliable pooled estimate of RLS prevalence in MS. The available evidence strongly suggests that RLS risk is higher among MS patients than healthy controls. SN - 1878-5506 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30025277/Systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_of_observational_studies_to_understand_the_prevalence_of_restless_legs_syndrome_in_multiple_sclerosis:_an_update_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1389-9457(18)30270-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -