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Potential Strategies to Achieve Universal Influenza Vaccination for Children: Provider Attitudes in Two States.
Acad Pediatr. 2018 Nov - Dec; 18(8):873-881.APed

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Childhood influenza vaccination rates remain suboptimal. Provider perceptions on strategies to achieve universal vaccination are needed. We assessed the perceptions and attitudes of primary care providers across 2 states regarding 2 strategies to potentially bolster rates: centralized reminder/recall (C-R/R), such as reminder/recall (R/R) notices from state immunization registries, and influenza vaccination by complementary community vaccinators (CCVs), such as retail pharmacies, schools, and health departments.

METHODS

We sent a mailed survey to a representative sample of providers across Colorado and New York. Questions addressed R/R activities for influenza vaccine, preferences and attitudes about the health department sending C-R/R notices for influenza vaccine, and attitudes about CCVs. Bivariate analyses assessed provider perceptions and compared perceptions by state.

RESULTS

The overall response rate was 56% (n = 590/1052). Twenty-two percent of providers in Colorado and 33% in New York performed practice-based R/R for all patients during the 2015-16 influenza season. Eighty-one percent of providers in both states preferred the health department or had no preference for who sent C-R/R notices for influenza vaccine to their patients; most preferred to include their practice names on C-R/R messages. Many providers in both Colorado (75%) and New York (46%, P < .001) agreed that their patients like the option of having CCVs where children can receive influenza vaccine. Some providers expressed concerns regarding potential loss of income and/or difficulty documenting receipt of influenza vaccine at CCVs.

CONCLUSIONS

Most providers support C-R/R, and many support CCVs to increase influenza vaccination rates. Collaborations between traditional primary care providers and CCVs might boost coverage.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science (ACCORDS) , University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora. Electronic address: Alison.Saville@ucdenver.edu.Department of Pediatrics, UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital , University of California at Los Angeles.Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science (ACCORDS) , University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora.Department of Pediatrics, UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital , University of California at Los Angeles.Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science (ACCORDS) , University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora.Department of Medicine, Statistics Core, David Geffen School of Medicine , University of California at Los Angeles.Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science (ACCORDS) , University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora.Department of Medicine, Statistics Core, David Geffen School of Medicine , University of California at Los Angeles.Colorado Immunization Information System, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment , Denver.Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science (ACCORDS) , University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora; Department of Pediatrics , University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30031132

Citation

Saville, Alison W., et al. "Potential Strategies to Achieve Universal Influenza Vaccination for Children: Provider Attitudes in Two States." Academic Pediatrics, vol. 18, no. 8, 2018, pp. 873-881.
Saville AW, Szilagyi P, Helmkamp L, et al. Potential Strategies to Achieve Universal Influenza Vaccination for Children: Provider Attitudes in Two States. Acad Pediatr. 2018;18(8):873-881.
Saville, A. W., Szilagyi, P., Helmkamp, L., Albertin, C., Gurfinkel, D., Vangela, S., Dickinson, L. M., Zhou, X., Roth, H., & Kempe, A. (2018). Potential Strategies to Achieve Universal Influenza Vaccination for Children: Provider Attitudes in Two States. Academic Pediatrics, 18(8), 873-881. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acap.2018.07.003
Saville AW, et al. Potential Strategies to Achieve Universal Influenza Vaccination for Children: Provider Attitudes in Two States. Acad Pediatr. 2018 Nov - Dec;18(8):873-881. PubMed PMID: 30031132.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Potential Strategies to Achieve Universal Influenza Vaccination for Children: Provider Attitudes in Two States. AU - Saville,Alison W, AU - Szilagyi,Peter, AU - Helmkamp,Laura, AU - Albertin,Christina, AU - Gurfinkel,Dennis, AU - Vangela,Sitaram, AU - Dickinson,L Miriam, AU - Zhou,Xinkai, AU - Roth,Heather, AU - Kempe,Allison, Y1 - 2018/07/19/ PY - 2018/03/27/received PY - 2018/07/02/revised PY - 2018/07/05/accepted PY - 2018/7/22/pubmed PY - 2019/11/5/medline PY - 2018/7/22/entrez KW - centralized reminder/recall KW - complementary community vaccinators KW - influenza vaccine KW - pediatrics KW - provider opinions KW - provider survey KW - universal influenza vaccination SP - 873 EP - 881 JF - Academic pediatrics JO - Acad Pediatr VL - 18 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Childhood influenza vaccination rates remain suboptimal. Provider perceptions on strategies to achieve universal vaccination are needed. We assessed the perceptions and attitudes of primary care providers across 2 states regarding 2 strategies to potentially bolster rates: centralized reminder/recall (C-R/R), such as reminder/recall (R/R) notices from state immunization registries, and influenza vaccination by complementary community vaccinators (CCVs), such as retail pharmacies, schools, and health departments. METHODS: We sent a mailed survey to a representative sample of providers across Colorado and New York. Questions addressed R/R activities for influenza vaccine, preferences and attitudes about the health department sending C-R/R notices for influenza vaccine, and attitudes about CCVs. Bivariate analyses assessed provider perceptions and compared perceptions by state. RESULTS: The overall response rate was 56% (n = 590/1052). Twenty-two percent of providers in Colorado and 33% in New York performed practice-based R/R for all patients during the 2015-16 influenza season. Eighty-one percent of providers in both states preferred the health department or had no preference for who sent C-R/R notices for influenza vaccine to their patients; most preferred to include their practice names on C-R/R messages. Many providers in both Colorado (75%) and New York (46%, P < .001) agreed that their patients like the option of having CCVs where children can receive influenza vaccine. Some providers expressed concerns regarding potential loss of income and/or difficulty documenting receipt of influenza vaccine at CCVs. CONCLUSIONS: Most providers support C-R/R, and many support CCVs to increase influenza vaccination rates. Collaborations between traditional primary care providers and CCVs might boost coverage. SN - 1876-2867 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30031132/Potential_Strategies_to_Achieve_Universal_Influenza_Vaccination_for_Children:_Provider_Attitudes_in_Two_States_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1876-2859(18)30463-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -