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Language and culture in speech-language and hearing professions in South Africa: The dangers of a single story.
S Afr J Commun Disord 2018; 65(1):e1-e7SA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Speech-language and hearing (SLH) professions in South Africa are facing significant challenges in the provision of clinical services to patients with communication disorders from a context that is culturally and linguistically diverse because of historic exclusions of black and African language speaking candidates in higher education training programmes. Over 20 years post the democratic dispensation, minimal changes have been noted in terms of the training, research as well as clinical service provision in these professions, although the demographic profile of students is seen to be transforming gradually. Objectives: We offer this viewpoint publication as a challenge to the professions to interrogate their academic and clinical orientation in respect of African contextual relevance and responsiveness. Method: We do this by identifying gaps within the higher education context, highlighting the influencing factors to the provision of linguistically and culturally appropriate SLH training and clinical services in South Africa, while asking questions about what SLH students and practitioners need to carefully consider. Results: We make recommendations about what needs to happen within the SLH professions in South Africa in order to stay safe from the dangers of a single story. Conclusion: We invite debate in order to allow for constructive engagement with this complex issue within the South African SLH professions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, School of Human and Community Development, University of the Witwatersrand. katijah.khoza@wits.ac.za.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30035607

Citation

Khoza-Shangase, Katijah, and Munyane Mophosho. "Language and Culture in Speech-language and Hearing Professions in South Africa: the Dangers of a Single Story." The South African Journal of Communication Disorders = Die Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif Vir Kommunikasieafwykings, vol. 65, no. 1, 2018, pp. e1-e7.
Khoza-Shangase K, Mophosho M. Language and culture in speech-language and hearing professions in South Africa: The dangers of a single story. S Afr J Commun Disord. 2018;65(1):e1-e7.
Khoza-Shangase, K., & Mophosho, M. (2018). Language and culture in speech-language and hearing professions in South Africa: The dangers of a single story. The South African Journal of Communication Disorders = Die Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif Vir Kommunikasieafwykings, 65(1), pp. e1-e7. doi:10.4102/sajcd.v65i1.594.
Khoza-Shangase K, Mophosho M. Language and Culture in Speech-language and Hearing Professions in South Africa: the Dangers of a Single Story. S Afr J Commun Disord. 2018 Jul 9;65(1):e1-e7. PubMed PMID: 30035607.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Language and culture in speech-language and hearing professions in South Africa: The dangers of a single story. AU - Khoza-Shangase,Katijah, AU - Mophosho,Munyane, Y1 - 2018/07/09/ PY - 2018/02/27/received PY - 2018/05/12/accepted PY - 2018/05/05/revised PY - 2018/7/24/entrez PY - 2018/7/24/pubmed PY - 2018/10/10/medline KW - Africanization KW - South Africa KW - communication KW - culture KW - curriculum KW - decolonization KW - diversity KW - exclusion KW - hearing KW - linguistic KW - racism KW - speech SP - e1 EP - e7 JF - The South African journal of communication disorders = Die Suid-Afrikaanse tydskrif vir Kommunikasieafwykings JO - S Afr J Commun Disord VL - 65 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Speech-language and hearing (SLH) professions in South Africa are facing significant challenges in the provision of clinical services to patients with communication disorders from a context that is culturally and linguistically diverse because of historic exclusions of black and African language speaking candidates in higher education training programmes. Over 20 years post the democratic dispensation, minimal changes have been noted in terms of the training, research as well as clinical service provision in these professions, although the demographic profile of students is seen to be transforming gradually. Objectives: We offer this viewpoint publication as a challenge to the professions to interrogate their academic and clinical orientation in respect of African contextual relevance and responsiveness. Method: We do this by identifying gaps within the higher education context, highlighting the influencing factors to the provision of linguistically and culturally appropriate SLH training and clinical services in South Africa, while asking questions about what SLH students and practitioners need to carefully consider. Results: We make recommendations about what needs to happen within the SLH professions in South Africa in order to stay safe from the dangers of a single story. Conclusion: We invite debate in order to allow for constructive engagement with this complex issue within the South African SLH professions. SN - 2225-4765 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30035607/Language_and_culture_in_speech_language_and_hearing_professions_in_South_Africa:_The_dangers_of_a_single_story_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/30035607/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -