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Environmental lead exposure and pubertal trajectory classes in South African adolescent males and females.
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Jul 01; 628-629:1437-1445.ST

Abstract

The effects of environmental lead exposure in the neuro-endocrine system have been shown to impact the maturation and tempo of puberty development in adolescents. In low and middle income countries very little is known regarding the detrimental health effects of childhood lead exposure with regard to the tempo of puberty development. To help address this gap in data, we examined the association between lead exposure and puberty progression in males and females. Study participants from the urban Birth to Twenty Plus (BT20+) birth cohort in Soweto-Johannesburg, South Africa with data for blood lead levels at age 13years, cord blood lead levels, pubic hair development and breast development in females, and pubic hair development and genital development in males, were included in this study. The sample comprised 1416 study participants (n=684 females). Pubertal development trajectory classes were defined using Latent Class Growth Analysis. Data were examined for (i) an association between cord blood lead levels and pubertal trajectory classes; and (ii) an association between blood lead levels at age 13years and pubertal trajectory classes. In females, there was an association between adolescent elevated blood lead levels (≥5μg/dL) and lower level of maturation at age 9years and slower progression of pubic hair and breast development (relative risk ratio (RRR)=0.45, p<0.0001; 95% CI (0.29-0.68)) and (RRR=0.46, p<0.01; 95% CI (0.27-0.77)), respectively. In males, elevated blood lead levels at birth were associated with slower tempo of pubic hair development (RRR=0.20, p<0.05). Findings from this study suggest a possible role for environmental lead in altering pubertal development in South African adolescents as shown by slower tempo of progression through the Tanner stages pubertal development in females and males. There were also gender-differences between the effects of prenatal and postnatal lead exposure during pubertal development.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Environment & Health Research Unit, Medical Research Council, South Africa; MRC/Wits Developmental Pathways for Health Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Electronic address: palesa.serendipitycards@gmail.com.MRC/Wits Developmental Pathways for Health Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Human Development, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Electronic address: linda.richter@wits.ac.za.MRC/Wits Developmental Pathways for Health Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Electronic address: juliana.kagura@wits.ac.za.Environment & Health Research Unit, Medical Research Council, South Africa; School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Environmental Health Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Johannesburg, South Africa. Electronic address: Angela.Mathee@mrc.ac.za.Environment & Health Research Unit, Medical Research Council, South Africa; School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Environmental Health Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Johannesburg, South Africa. Electronic address: Nisha.Naicker@mrc.ac.za.MRC/Wits Developmental Pathways for Health Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Human Development, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Electronic address: san@global.co.za.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30045563

Citation

Nkomo, Palesa, et al. "Environmental Lead Exposure and Pubertal Trajectory Classes in South African Adolescent Males and Females." The Science of the Total Environment, vol. 628-629, 2018, pp. 1437-1445.
Nkomo P, Richter LM, Kagura J, et al. Environmental lead exposure and pubertal trajectory classes in South African adolescent males and females. Sci Total Environ. 2018;628-629:1437-1445.
Nkomo, P., Richter, L. M., Kagura, J., Mathee, A., Naicker, N., & Norris, S. A. (2018). Environmental lead exposure and pubertal trajectory classes in South African adolescent males and females. The Science of the Total Environment, 628-629, 1437-1445. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.02.150
Nkomo P, et al. Environmental Lead Exposure and Pubertal Trajectory Classes in South African Adolescent Males and Females. Sci Total Environ. 2018 Jul 1;628-629:1437-1445. PubMed PMID: 30045563.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Environmental lead exposure and pubertal trajectory classes in South African adolescent males and females. AU - Nkomo,Palesa, AU - Richter,Linda M, AU - Kagura,Juliana, AU - Mathee,Angela, AU - Naicker,Nisha, AU - Norris,Shane A, Y1 - 2018/02/20/ PY - 2017/11/23/received PY - 2018/02/10/revised PY - 2018/02/12/accepted PY - 2018/7/27/entrez PY - 2018/7/27/pubmed PY - 2018/10/12/medline KW - Birth to twenty plus KW - Blood lead KW - Breast KW - Genitalia KW - Johannesburg KW - Puberty development KW - Pubic hair SP - 1437 EP - 1445 JF - The Science of the total environment JO - Sci Total Environ VL - 628-629 N2 - The effects of environmental lead exposure in the neuro-endocrine system have been shown to impact the maturation and tempo of puberty development in adolescents. In low and middle income countries very little is known regarding the detrimental health effects of childhood lead exposure with regard to the tempo of puberty development. To help address this gap in data, we examined the association between lead exposure and puberty progression in males and females. Study participants from the urban Birth to Twenty Plus (BT20+) birth cohort in Soweto-Johannesburg, South Africa with data for blood lead levels at age 13years, cord blood lead levels, pubic hair development and breast development in females, and pubic hair development and genital development in males, were included in this study. The sample comprised 1416 study participants (n=684 females). Pubertal development trajectory classes were defined using Latent Class Growth Analysis. Data were examined for (i) an association between cord blood lead levels and pubertal trajectory classes; and (ii) an association between blood lead levels at age 13years and pubertal trajectory classes. In females, there was an association between adolescent elevated blood lead levels (≥5μg/dL) and lower level of maturation at age 9years and slower progression of pubic hair and breast development (relative risk ratio (RRR)=0.45, p<0.0001; 95% CI (0.29-0.68)) and (RRR=0.46, p<0.01; 95% CI (0.27-0.77)), respectively. In males, elevated blood lead levels at birth were associated with slower tempo of pubic hair development (RRR=0.20, p<0.05). Findings from this study suggest a possible role for environmental lead in altering pubertal development in South African adolescents as shown by slower tempo of progression through the Tanner stages pubertal development in females and males. There were also gender-differences between the effects of prenatal and postnatal lead exposure during pubertal development. SN - 1879-1026 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30045563/Environmental_lead_exposure_and_pubertal_trajectory_classes_in_South_African_adolescent_males_and_females_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0048-9697(18)30541-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -