Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

High Prevalence of Hypovitaminosis D in Patients with Low Back Pain: Evidence from Meta-Analysis.
Pain Physician. 2018 07; 21(4):E389-E399.PP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Emerging evidence suggests an association between vitamin D deficiency and low back pain (LBP).

OBJECTIVE

To pool evidence on the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in patients with LBP.

STUDY DESIGN

Meta-analysis.

METHODS

A comprehensive literature search was done in PubMed, Cochrane Database, and Google scholar for observational studies including cohort, cross sectional (CS), and case control (CC) evaluating the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in LBP patients. The primary outcome assessed was a prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in patients with LBP, presented as weighted pooled prevalence ratio (WPPR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) using the random effects model. Heterogeneity and inconsistency of the measurements were identified through Cochran's Q statistic and I² statistic. We also performed sensitivity analysis, publication bias (using funnel plot and Begg's test), and subgroup analysis.

RESULTS

Fourteen studies (6 were CC, 6 CS, and 2 cohort) involving 2602 patients were included in the final analysis. The WPPR (95% CI) of hypovitaminosis D in patients with LBP was found to be 0.72 (0.60-0.83). Marked heterogeneity was observed, median quality score of all studies was 7.5 interquartile range (IQR) (6.2 - 8.7) on a scale of 0 to 11. Sensitivity analysis showed robustness of the results. The WPPR of hypovitaminosis D was lower in CS at 0.60 (0.35-0.85) as compared to CC studies at 0.81 (0.72-0.90) (P < 0.01). The WPPR was lower in men at 0.74 (0.63-0.86) as compared to women at 0.84 (0.78-0.89) (P < 0.01). No publication bias was observed.

LIMITATIONS

Heterogeneity in the cut off level of vitamin D to classify the included patients as vitamin D deficient.

CONCLUSIONS

The high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D was observed in patients with LBP. This provides a chance to screen the deficiency and correct it by supplementation, which can be therapeutic adjunct in the management of LBP patients.

KEY WORDS

Low back pain, hypovitaminosis D, meta-analysis, pooled prevalence, systematic review.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacy Practice, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, SAS Nagar (Mohali).National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Mohali, Punjab, India.Clinical Research Unit, Department of Pharmacy Practice, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, SAS Nagar, Punjab, India.Department of Anaesthesia, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30045605

Citation

Bansal, Dipika, et al. "High Prevalence of Hypovitaminosis D in Patients With Low Back Pain: Evidence From Meta-Analysis." Pain Physician, vol. 21, no. 4, 2018, pp. E389-E399.
Bansal D, Boya CS, Vatte R, et al. High Prevalence of Hypovitaminosis D in Patients with Low Back Pain: Evidence from Meta-Analysis. Pain Physician. 2018;21(4):E389-E399.
Bansal, D., Boya, C. S., Vatte, R., & Ghai, B. (2018). High Prevalence of Hypovitaminosis D in Patients with Low Back Pain: Evidence from Meta-Analysis. Pain Physician, 21(4), E389-E399.
Bansal D, et al. High Prevalence of Hypovitaminosis D in Patients With Low Back Pain: Evidence From Meta-Analysis. Pain Physician. 2018;21(4):E389-E399. PubMed PMID: 30045605.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High Prevalence of Hypovitaminosis D in Patients with Low Back Pain: Evidence from Meta-Analysis. AU - Bansal,Dipika, AU - Boya,Chandra Sehkar, AU - Vatte,Rambabu, AU - Ghai,Babita, PY - 2018/7/27/entrez PY - 2018/7/27/pubmed PY - 2019/2/28/medline SP - E389 EP - E399 JF - Pain physician JO - Pain Physician VL - 21 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence suggests an association between vitamin D deficiency and low back pain (LBP). OBJECTIVE: To pool evidence on the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in patients with LBP. STUDY DESIGN: Meta-analysis. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search was done in PubMed, Cochrane Database, and Google scholar for observational studies including cohort, cross sectional (CS), and case control (CC) evaluating the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in LBP patients. The primary outcome assessed was a prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in patients with LBP, presented as weighted pooled prevalence ratio (WPPR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) using the random effects model. Heterogeneity and inconsistency of the measurements were identified through Cochran's Q statistic and I² statistic. We also performed sensitivity analysis, publication bias (using funnel plot and Begg's test), and subgroup analysis. RESULTS: Fourteen studies (6 were CC, 6 CS, and 2 cohort) involving 2602 patients were included in the final analysis. The WPPR (95% CI) of hypovitaminosis D in patients with LBP was found to be 0.72 (0.60-0.83). Marked heterogeneity was observed, median quality score of all studies was 7.5 interquartile range (IQR) (6.2 - 8.7) on a scale of 0 to 11. Sensitivity analysis showed robustness of the results. The WPPR of hypovitaminosis D was lower in CS at 0.60 (0.35-0.85) as compared to CC studies at 0.81 (0.72-0.90) (P < 0.01). The WPPR was lower in men at 0.74 (0.63-0.86) as compared to women at 0.84 (0.78-0.89) (P < 0.01). No publication bias was observed. LIMITATIONS: Heterogeneity in the cut off level of vitamin D to classify the included patients as vitamin D deficient. CONCLUSIONS: The high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D was observed in patients with LBP. This provides a chance to screen the deficiency and correct it by supplementation, which can be therapeutic adjunct in the management of LBP patients. KEY WORDS: Low back pain, hypovitaminosis D, meta-analysis, pooled prevalence, systematic review. SN - 2150-1149 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30045605/High_Prevalence_of_Hypovitaminosis_D_in_Patients_with_Low_Back_Pain:_Evidence_from_Meta_Analysis_ L2 - http://www.painphysicianjournal.com/linkout?issn=1533-3159&amp;vol=21&amp;page=E389 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.