Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Lower Airway Bacterial Colonization Patterns and Species-Specific Interactions in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.
J Clin Microbiol 2018; 56(10)JC

Abstract

Little is known about interactions between nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lower respiratory tract in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. We characterized colonization by these four bacterial species, determined species-specific interactions, and estimated the effects of host factors on bacterial colonization among COPD patients. We conducted a prospective cohort study in veterans with COPD that involved monthly clinical assessment and sputum cultures with an average duration of follow-up of 4.5 years. Cultures were used for bacterial identification. We analyzed bacterial interactions using generalized linear mixed models after controlling for clinical and demographic variables. The outcomes of interest were the relationships between bacteria based on clinical status (stable or exacerbation). One hundred eighty-one participants completed a total of 8,843 clinic visits, 30.8% of which had at least one of the four bacteria isolated. H. influenzae was the most common bacterium isolated (14.4%), followed by P. aeruginosa (8.1%). In adjusted models, S. pneumoniae colonization was positively associated with H. influenzae colonization (odds ratio [OR], 2.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.03 to 3.73). We identified negative associations between P. aeruginosa and H. influenzae (OR, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.10 to 0.22) and P. aeruginosa and M. catarrhalis (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.35 to 0.75). Associations were similar during stable and exacerbation visits. Recent antimicrobial therapy was associated with a lower prevalence of S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, and M. catarrhalis, but not P. aeruginosa Our findings support the presence of specific interspecies interactions between common bacteria in the lower respiratory tracts of COPD patients. Further work is necessary to elucidate the mechanisms of these complex interactions that shift bacterial species.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA dmjacobs@buffalo.edu.Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA.Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA.Department of Medicine, Clinical and Translational Research Center, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA.Department of Medicine, Clinical and Translational Research Center, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30045868

Citation

Jacobs, David M., et al. "Lower Airway Bacterial Colonization Patterns and Species-Specific Interactions in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease." Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 56, no. 10, 2018.
Jacobs DM, Ochs-Balcom HM, Zhao J, et al. Lower Airway Bacterial Colonization Patterns and Species-Specific Interactions in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. J Clin Microbiol. 2018;56(10).
Jacobs, D. M., Ochs-Balcom, H. M., Zhao, J., Murphy, T. F., & Sethi, S. (2018). Lower Airway Bacterial Colonization Patterns and Species-Specific Interactions in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 56(10), doi:10.1128/JCM.00330-18.
Jacobs DM, et al. Lower Airway Bacterial Colonization Patterns and Species-Specific Interactions in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. J Clin Microbiol. 2018;56(10) PubMed PMID: 30045868.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lower Airway Bacterial Colonization Patterns and Species-Specific Interactions in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. AU - Jacobs,David M, AU - Ochs-Balcom,Heather M, AU - Zhao,Jiwei, AU - Murphy,Timothy F, AU - Sethi,Sanjay, Y1 - 2018/09/25/ PY - 2018/02/25/received PY - 2018/07/18/accepted PY - 2018/7/27/pubmed PY - 2019/9/19/medline PY - 2018/7/27/entrez KW - COPD KW - bacterial colonization KW - exacerbations KW - interactions JF - Journal of clinical microbiology JO - J. Clin. Microbiol. VL - 56 IS - 10 N2 - Little is known about interactions between nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lower respiratory tract in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. We characterized colonization by these four bacterial species, determined species-specific interactions, and estimated the effects of host factors on bacterial colonization among COPD patients. We conducted a prospective cohort study in veterans with COPD that involved monthly clinical assessment and sputum cultures with an average duration of follow-up of 4.5 years. Cultures were used for bacterial identification. We analyzed bacterial interactions using generalized linear mixed models after controlling for clinical and demographic variables. The outcomes of interest were the relationships between bacteria based on clinical status (stable or exacerbation). One hundred eighty-one participants completed a total of 8,843 clinic visits, 30.8% of which had at least one of the four bacteria isolated. H. influenzae was the most common bacterium isolated (14.4%), followed by P. aeruginosa (8.1%). In adjusted models, S. pneumoniae colonization was positively associated with H. influenzae colonization (odds ratio [OR], 2.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.03 to 3.73). We identified negative associations between P. aeruginosa and H. influenzae (OR, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.10 to 0.22) and P. aeruginosa and M. catarrhalis (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.35 to 0.75). Associations were similar during stable and exacerbation visits. Recent antimicrobial therapy was associated with a lower prevalence of S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, and M. catarrhalis, but not P. aeruginosa Our findings support the presence of specific interspecies interactions between common bacteria in the lower respiratory tracts of COPD patients. Further work is necessary to elucidate the mechanisms of these complex interactions that shift bacterial species. SN - 1098-660X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30045868/Lower_Airway_Bacterial_Colonization_Patterns_and_Species_Specific_Interactions_in_Chronic_Obstructive_Pulmonary_Disease_ L2 - http://jcm.asm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=30045868 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -