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Association between Oral Candida and Bacteriome in Children with Severe ECC.
J Dent Res. 2018 12; 97(13):1468-1476.JD

Abstract

Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal organism frequently detected in the oral cavity of children with severe early childhood caries (S-ECC). Previous studies suggested the cariogenic potential of C. albicans, in vitro and in vivo, and further demonstrated its synergistic interactions with Streptococcus mutans. In combination, the 2 organisms are associated with higher caries severity in a rodent model. However, it remains unknown whether C. albicans influences the composition and diversity of the entire oral bacterial community to promote S-ECC onset. With 16s rRNA amplicon sequencing, this study analyzed the microbiota of saliva and supragingival plaque from 39 children (21 S-ECC and 18 caries-free [CF]) and 33 mothers (17 S-ECC and 16 CF). The results revealed that the presence of oral C. albicans is associated with a highly acidogenic and acid-tolerant bacterial community in S-ECC, with an increased abundance of plaque Streptococcus (particularly S. mutans) and certain Lactobacillus/Scardovia species and salivary/plaque Veillonella and Prevotella, as well as decreased levels of salivary/plaque Actinomyces. Concurrent with this microbial community assembly, the activity of glucosyltransferases (cariogenic virulence factors secreted by S. mutans) in plaque was significantly elevated when C. albicans was present. Moreover, the oral microbial community composition and diversity differed significantly by disease group (CF vs. S-ECC) and sample source (saliva vs. plaque). Children and mothers within the CF and S-ECC groups shared microbiota composition and diversity, suggesting a strong maternal influence on children's oral microbiota. Altogether, this study underscores the importance of C. albicans in association with the oral bacteriome in the context of S-ECC etiopathogenesis. Further longitudinal studies are warranted to examine how fungal-bacterial interactions modulate the onset and severity of S-ECC, potentially leading to novel anticaries treatments that address fungal contributions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Eastman Institute for Oral Health, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA.2 Genomics Research Center, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA.1 Eastman Institute for Oral Health, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA.1 Eastman Institute for Oral Health, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA.3 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA.4 Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA.5 Divisions of Pediatric Dentistry and Community Oral Health, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.1 Eastman Institute for Oral Health, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA. 2 Genomics Research Center, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA.1 Eastman Institute for Oral Health, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA.5 Divisions of Pediatric Dentistry and Community Oral Health, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.2 Genomics Research Center, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA. 3 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30049240

Citation

Xiao, J, et al. "Association Between Oral Candida and Bacteriome in Children With Severe ECC." Journal of Dental Research, vol. 97, no. 13, 2018, pp. 1468-1476.
Xiao J, Grier A, Faustoferri RC, et al. Association between Oral Candida and Bacteriome in Children with Severe ECC. J Dent Res. 2018;97(13):1468-1476.
Xiao, J., Grier, A., Faustoferri, R. C., Alzoubi, S., Gill, A. L., Feng, C., Liu, Y., Quivey, R. G., Kopycka-Kedzierawski, D. T., Koo, H., & Gill, S. R. (2018). Association between Oral Candida and Bacteriome in Children with Severe ECC. Journal of Dental Research, 97(13), 1468-1476. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022034518790941
Xiao J, et al. Association Between Oral Candida and Bacteriome in Children With Severe ECC. J Dent Res. 2018;97(13):1468-1476. PubMed PMID: 30049240.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between Oral Candida and Bacteriome in Children with Severe ECC. AU - Xiao,J, AU - Grier,A, AU - Faustoferri,R C, AU - Alzoubi,S, AU - Gill,A L, AU - Feng,C, AU - Liu,Y, AU - Quivey,R G, AU - Kopycka-Kedzierawski,D T, AU - Koo,H, AU - Gill,S R, Y1 - 2018/07/26/ PY - 2018/7/28/pubmed PY - 2019/9/13/medline PY - 2018/7/28/entrez KW - Candida species KW - Streptococcus mutans KW - early childhood caries KW - glucosyltransferase KW - maternal influence KW - microbiota SP - 1468 EP - 1476 JF - Journal of dental research JO - J Dent Res VL - 97 IS - 13 N2 - Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal organism frequently detected in the oral cavity of children with severe early childhood caries (S-ECC). Previous studies suggested the cariogenic potential of C. albicans, in vitro and in vivo, and further demonstrated its synergistic interactions with Streptococcus mutans. In combination, the 2 organisms are associated with higher caries severity in a rodent model. However, it remains unknown whether C. albicans influences the composition and diversity of the entire oral bacterial community to promote S-ECC onset. With 16s rRNA amplicon sequencing, this study analyzed the microbiota of saliva and supragingival plaque from 39 children (21 S-ECC and 18 caries-free [CF]) and 33 mothers (17 S-ECC and 16 CF). The results revealed that the presence of oral C. albicans is associated with a highly acidogenic and acid-tolerant bacterial community in S-ECC, with an increased abundance of plaque Streptococcus (particularly S. mutans) and certain Lactobacillus/Scardovia species and salivary/plaque Veillonella and Prevotella, as well as decreased levels of salivary/plaque Actinomyces. Concurrent with this microbial community assembly, the activity of glucosyltransferases (cariogenic virulence factors secreted by S. mutans) in plaque was significantly elevated when C. albicans was present. Moreover, the oral microbial community composition and diversity differed significantly by disease group (CF vs. S-ECC) and sample source (saliva vs. plaque). Children and mothers within the CF and S-ECC groups shared microbiota composition and diversity, suggesting a strong maternal influence on children's oral microbiota. Altogether, this study underscores the importance of C. albicans in association with the oral bacteriome in the context of S-ECC etiopathogenesis. Further longitudinal studies are warranted to examine how fungal-bacterial interactions modulate the onset and severity of S-ECC, potentially leading to novel anticaries treatments that address fungal contributions. SN - 1544-0591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30049240/Association_between_Oral_Candida_and_Bacteriome_in_Children_with_Severe_ECC_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -