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Attenuation of High-Fat Diet-Induced Rat Liver Oxidative Stress and Steatosis by Combined Hydroxytyrosol- (HT-) Eicosapentaenoic Acid Supplementation Mainly Relies on HT.
Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2018; 2018:5109503.OM

Abstract

Pharmacological therapy for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is not approved at the present time. For this purpose, the effect of combined eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 50 mg/kg/day) modulating hepatic lipid metabolism and hydroxytyrosol (HT; 5 mg/kg/day) exerting antioxidant actions was evaluated on hepatic steatosis and oxidative stress induced by a high-fat diet (HFD; 60% fat, 20% protein, and 20% carbohydrates) compared to a control diet (CD; 10% fat, 20% protein, and 70% carbohydrates) in mice fed for 12 weeks. HFD-induced liver steatosis (i) was reduced by 32% by EPA, without changes in oxidative stress-related parameters and mild recovery of Nrf2 functioning affording antioxidation and (ii) was decreased by 42% by HT, concomitantly with total regain of the glutathione status diminished by HFD, 42% to 59% recovery of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation enhanced by HFD, and regain of Nrf2 functioning, whereas (iii) combined EPA + HT supplementation elicited 74% reduction in liver steatosis, with total recovery of the antioxidant potential in a similar manner than HT. It is concluded that combined HT + EPA drastically decreases NAFLD development, an effect that shows additivity in HT and EPA effects that mainly relies on HT, strengthening the impact of oxidative stress as a central mechanism underlying liver steatosis in obesity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.Nutrition and Dietetics School, Faculty of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Maule, Curicó, Chile.Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology Program, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30057681

Citation

Echeverría, Francisca, et al. "Attenuation of High-Fat Diet-Induced Rat Liver Oxidative Stress and Steatosis By Combined Hydroxytyrosol- (HT-) Eicosapentaenoic Acid Supplementation Mainly Relies On HT." Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, vol. 2018, 2018, p. 5109503.
Echeverría F, Valenzuela R, Bustamante A, et al. Attenuation of High-Fat Diet-Induced Rat Liver Oxidative Stress and Steatosis by Combined Hydroxytyrosol- (HT-) Eicosapentaenoic Acid Supplementation Mainly Relies on HT. Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2018;2018:5109503.
Echeverría, F., Valenzuela, R., Bustamante, A., Álvarez, D., Ortiz, M., Soto-Alarcon, S. A., Muñoz, P., Corbari, A., & Videla, L. A. (2018). Attenuation of High-Fat Diet-Induced Rat Liver Oxidative Stress and Steatosis by Combined Hydroxytyrosol- (HT-) Eicosapentaenoic Acid Supplementation Mainly Relies on HT. Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, 2018, 5109503. https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5109503
Echeverría F, et al. Attenuation of High-Fat Diet-Induced Rat Liver Oxidative Stress and Steatosis By Combined Hydroxytyrosol- (HT-) Eicosapentaenoic Acid Supplementation Mainly Relies On HT. Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2018;2018:5109503. PubMed PMID: 30057681.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Attenuation of High-Fat Diet-Induced Rat Liver Oxidative Stress and Steatosis by Combined Hydroxytyrosol- (HT-) Eicosapentaenoic Acid Supplementation Mainly Relies on HT. AU - Echeverría,Francisca, AU - Valenzuela,Rodrigo, AU - Bustamante,Andrés, AU - Álvarez,Daniela, AU - Ortiz,Macarena, AU - Soto-Alarcon,Sandra A, AU - Muñoz,Patricio, AU - Corbari,Alicia, AU - Videla,Luis A, Y1 - 2018/07/02/ PY - 2018/01/15/received PY - 2018/04/18/revised PY - 2018/04/26/accepted PY - 2018/7/31/entrez PY - 2018/7/31/pubmed PY - 2018/10/23/medline SP - 5109503 EP - 5109503 JF - Oxidative medicine and cellular longevity JO - Oxid Med Cell Longev VL - 2018 N2 - Pharmacological therapy for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is not approved at the present time. For this purpose, the effect of combined eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 50 mg/kg/day) modulating hepatic lipid metabolism and hydroxytyrosol (HT; 5 mg/kg/day) exerting antioxidant actions was evaluated on hepatic steatosis and oxidative stress induced by a high-fat diet (HFD; 60% fat, 20% protein, and 20% carbohydrates) compared to a control diet (CD; 10% fat, 20% protein, and 70% carbohydrates) in mice fed for 12 weeks. HFD-induced liver steatosis (i) was reduced by 32% by EPA, without changes in oxidative stress-related parameters and mild recovery of Nrf2 functioning affording antioxidation and (ii) was decreased by 42% by HT, concomitantly with total regain of the glutathione status diminished by HFD, 42% to 59% recovery of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation enhanced by HFD, and regain of Nrf2 functioning, whereas (iii) combined EPA + HT supplementation elicited 74% reduction in liver steatosis, with total recovery of the antioxidant potential in a similar manner than HT. It is concluded that combined HT + EPA drastically decreases NAFLD development, an effect that shows additivity in HT and EPA effects that mainly relies on HT, strengthening the impact of oxidative stress as a central mechanism underlying liver steatosis in obesity. SN - 1942-0994 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30057681/Attenuation_of_High_Fat_Diet_Induced_Rat_Liver_Oxidative_Stress_and_Steatosis_by_Combined_Hydroxytyrosol___HT___Eicosapentaenoic_Acid_Supplementation_Mainly_Relies_on_HT_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/5109503 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -