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Sugar-Sweetened Soft Drinks and Fructose Consumption Are Associated with Hyperuricemia: Cross-Sectional Analysis from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).
Nutrients 2018; 10(8)N

Abstract

The secular trend of hyperuricemia coincides with the substantial increase in the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. Our aim was to evaluate the association between the consumption of soft drinks, dietary fructose and unsweetened, non-processed fruit juices with hyperuricemia in a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data (2008⁻2010; n = 7173) of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). The explanatory variables were the consumption of soft drinks, fruit juice, and fructose using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. The outcomes were hyperuricemia and the uric acid concentration in serum. Regression models were tested, and a significance level of 5% was adopted. In men, the daily consumption of a portion of soft drink/day (250 mL) almost doubled the chance of hyperuricemia with a linear trend. In women, the consumption of ≥0.1 to <1.0 soft drink/day was associated with a higher chance of hyperuricemia, but there was no linear trend. High fructose consumption in men and moderate and high consumption in women were associated with hyperuricemia. All categories of soft drinks consumption were linearly associated with increased serum uric acid levels. Our findings suggest that the consumption of soft drinks and dietary fructose is positively associated with a higher chance of hyperuricemia and higher uric acid levels in Brazilian adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória CEP 29042-755, Brazil. jordana.herzog@gmail.com.Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória CEP 29042-755, Brazil. josegmill@gmail.com.Escola de Enfermagem, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte CEP 30130-100, Brazil. jguveme@ufmg.br.Escola de Enfermagem, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte CEP 30130-100, Brazil. alexandradm84@gmail.com.Hospital das Clinicas and School of Medicine, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte CEP 30130-100, Brazil. sandhi.barreto@gmail.com.Clinical and Epidemiological Research Center, University Hospital, University of São Paulo, São Paulo CEP 05508-000, Brazil. isabensenor@hu.usp.br.Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória CEP 29042-755, Brazil. mdcarmen2007@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30060512

Citation

Siqueira, Jordana Herzog, et al. "Sugar-Sweetened Soft Drinks and Fructose Consumption Are Associated With Hyperuricemia: Cross-Sectional Analysis From the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)." Nutrients, vol. 10, no. 8, 2018.
Siqueira JH, Mill JG, Velasquez-Melendez G, et al. Sugar-Sweetened Soft Drinks and Fructose Consumption Are Associated with Hyperuricemia: Cross-Sectional Analysis from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Nutrients. 2018;10(8).
Siqueira, J. H., Mill, J. G., Velasquez-Melendez, G., Moreira, A. D., Barreto, S. M., Benseñor, I. M., & Molina, M. D. C. B. (2018). Sugar-Sweetened Soft Drinks and Fructose Consumption Are Associated with Hyperuricemia: Cross-Sectional Analysis from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Nutrients, 10(8), doi:10.3390/nu10080981.
Siqueira JH, et al. Sugar-Sweetened Soft Drinks and Fructose Consumption Are Associated With Hyperuricemia: Cross-Sectional Analysis From the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Nutrients. 2018 Jul 27;10(8) PubMed PMID: 30060512.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sugar-Sweetened Soft Drinks and Fructose Consumption Are Associated with Hyperuricemia: Cross-Sectional Analysis from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). AU - Siqueira,Jordana Herzog, AU - Mill,José Geraldo, AU - Velasquez-Melendez,Gustavo, AU - Moreira,Alexandra Dias, AU - Barreto,Sandhi Maria, AU - Benseñor,Isabela Martins, AU - Molina,Maria Del Carmen Bisi, Y1 - 2018/07/27/ PY - 2018/07/03/received PY - 2018/07/19/revised PY - 2018/07/25/accepted PY - 2018/8/1/entrez PY - 2018/8/1/pubmed PY - 2018/11/14/medline KW - fructose KW - fruit and vegetable juices KW - hyperuricemia KW - sugar-sweetened soft drinks intake KW - uric acid JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 10 IS - 8 N2 - The secular trend of hyperuricemia coincides with the substantial increase in the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. Our aim was to evaluate the association between the consumption of soft drinks, dietary fructose and unsweetened, non-processed fruit juices with hyperuricemia in a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data (2008⁻2010; n = 7173) of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). The explanatory variables were the consumption of soft drinks, fruit juice, and fructose using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. The outcomes were hyperuricemia and the uric acid concentration in serum. Regression models were tested, and a significance level of 5% was adopted. In men, the daily consumption of a portion of soft drink/day (250 mL) almost doubled the chance of hyperuricemia with a linear trend. In women, the consumption of ≥0.1 to <1.0 soft drink/day was associated with a higher chance of hyperuricemia, but there was no linear trend. High fructose consumption in men and moderate and high consumption in women were associated with hyperuricemia. All categories of soft drinks consumption were linearly associated with increased serum uric acid levels. Our findings suggest that the consumption of soft drinks and dietary fructose is positively associated with a higher chance of hyperuricemia and higher uric acid levels in Brazilian adults. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30060512/Sugar_Sweetened_Soft_Drinks_and_Fructose_Consumption_Are_Associated_with_Hyperuricemia:_Cross_Sectional_Analysis_from_the_Brazilian_Longitudinal_Study_of_Adult_Health__ELSA_Brasil__ L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu10080981 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -