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The association of repeated measurements of prenatal exposure to triclosan with fetal and early-childhood growth.
Environ Int. 2018 11; 120:54-62.EI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Triclosan (TCS) is known to possess endocrine disrupting properties and metabolize rapidly in the human body. Human data concerning repeated measurements of TCS throughout pregnancy in relation to fetal and childhood growth are sparse.

OBJECTIVES

We investigated the associations between multiple measurements of maternal urinary concentrations of TCS during pregnancy and fetal and early-childhood growth.

METHODS

The study population included 850 mother-infant pairs who participated in a prenatal cohort established between 2014 and 2015 in Wuhan. Prenatal TCS exposure was measured in a complete series of urine samples collected at the first, second and third trimesters. General linear models and generalized estimating equation models were applied to evaluate the associations of the averaged maternal urinary concentrations of TCS over trimesters and trimester-specific urinary TCS with the z-scores of estimated fetal weight, head circumference, abdominal circumference, and femur length at 16, 24, and 31 gestational weeks, weight and length at birth, and weight and height at 0.5, 1, and 2 years of age.

RESULTS

In overall infants, we did not observe any significant association of the averaged maternal urinary concentrations of TCS over trimesters with ultrasound parameters and size at birth. However, a positive association of borderline statistical significance was found between averaged prenatal TCS exposure and the third-trimester estimated fetal weight z-score in girls in sex-stratified analyses (β = 0.054, 95% CI: -0.005, 0.113, p = 0.07). Moreover, averaged prenatal TCS exposure was positively associated with 2 year-old weight z-score among total infants (β = 0.046, 95% CI: 0.005, 0.087). After stratifying by sex, the same association was observed in girls with more prominent estimation (β = 0.062, 95% CI: 0.000, 0.124), whereas the association weakened and became not significant in boys (β = 0.033, 95% CI: -0.024, 0.089). TCS exposure at 1st and 2nd-trimester were positively associated with weight z-score at 2 years, in both overall and female infants.

CONCLUSIONS

Prenatal exposure to triclosan was associated with elevated third-trimester estimated fetal weight and 2 year-old weight z-score in girls, and the early and middle stage of pregnancy may be the windows of vulnerability. Apart from these findings, we did not find strong evidence for prenatal triclosan exposure in relation to fetal and early-childhood growth.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.State Key Laboratory of Environmental and Biological Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong, SAR, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Women and Children Medical and Healthcare Center of Wuhan, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Women and Children Medical and Healthcare Center of Wuhan, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.State Key Laboratory of Environmental and Biological Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong, SAR, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.State Key Laboratory of Environmental and Biological Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong, SAR, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: zwcai@hkbu.edu.hk.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: xust@hust.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30064055

Citation

Wu, Chuansha, et al. "The Association of Repeated Measurements of Prenatal Exposure to Triclosan With Fetal and Early-childhood Growth." Environment International, vol. 120, 2018, pp. 54-62.
Wu C, Li J, Xia W, et al. The association of repeated measurements of prenatal exposure to triclosan with fetal and early-childhood growth. Environ Int. 2018;120:54-62.
Wu, C., Li, J., Xia, W., Li, Y., Zhang, B., Zhou, A., Hu, J., Li, C., Zhao, H., Jiang, M., Hu, C., Liao, J., Huo, W., Chen, X., Xu, B., Lu, S., Cai, Z., & Xu, S. (2018). The association of repeated measurements of prenatal exposure to triclosan with fetal and early-childhood growth. Environment International, 120, 54-62. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2018.07.022
Wu C, et al. The Association of Repeated Measurements of Prenatal Exposure to Triclosan With Fetal and Early-childhood Growth. Environ Int. 2018;120:54-62. PubMed PMID: 30064055.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The association of repeated measurements of prenatal exposure to triclosan with fetal and early-childhood growth. AU - Wu,Chuansha, AU - Li,Jiufeng, AU - Xia,Wei, AU - Li,Yuanyuan, AU - Zhang,Bin, AU - Zhou,Aifen, AU - Hu,Jie, AU - Li,Chunhui, AU - Zhao,Hongzhi, AU - Jiang,Minmin, AU - Hu,Chen, AU - Liao,Jiaqiang, AU - Huo,Wenqian, AU - Chen,Xi, AU - Xu,Bing, AU - Lu,Shi, AU - Cai,Zongwei, AU - Xu,Shunqing, Y1 - 2018/07/29/ PY - 2018/03/13/received PY - 2018/07/10/revised PY - 2018/07/14/accepted PY - 2018/8/1/pubmed PY - 2019/3/14/medline PY - 2018/8/1/entrez KW - Early-childhood growth KW - Fetal growth KW - Repeated measurements KW - Triclosan SP - 54 EP - 62 JF - Environment international JO - Environ Int VL - 120 N2 - BACKGROUND: Triclosan (TCS) is known to possess endocrine disrupting properties and metabolize rapidly in the human body. Human data concerning repeated measurements of TCS throughout pregnancy in relation to fetal and childhood growth are sparse. OBJECTIVES: We investigated the associations between multiple measurements of maternal urinary concentrations of TCS during pregnancy and fetal and early-childhood growth. METHODS: The study population included 850 mother-infant pairs who participated in a prenatal cohort established between 2014 and 2015 in Wuhan. Prenatal TCS exposure was measured in a complete series of urine samples collected at the first, second and third trimesters. General linear models and generalized estimating equation models were applied to evaluate the associations of the averaged maternal urinary concentrations of TCS over trimesters and trimester-specific urinary TCS with the z-scores of estimated fetal weight, head circumference, abdominal circumference, and femur length at 16, 24, and 31 gestational weeks, weight and length at birth, and weight and height at 0.5, 1, and 2 years of age. RESULTS: In overall infants, we did not observe any significant association of the averaged maternal urinary concentrations of TCS over trimesters with ultrasound parameters and size at birth. However, a positive association of borderline statistical significance was found between averaged prenatal TCS exposure and the third-trimester estimated fetal weight z-score in girls in sex-stratified analyses (β = 0.054, 95% CI: -0.005, 0.113, p = 0.07). Moreover, averaged prenatal TCS exposure was positively associated with 2 year-old weight z-score among total infants (β = 0.046, 95% CI: 0.005, 0.087). After stratifying by sex, the same association was observed in girls with more prominent estimation (β = 0.062, 95% CI: 0.000, 0.124), whereas the association weakened and became not significant in boys (β = 0.033, 95% CI: -0.024, 0.089). TCS exposure at 1st and 2nd-trimester were positively associated with weight z-score at 2 years, in both overall and female infants. CONCLUSIONS: Prenatal exposure to triclosan was associated with elevated third-trimester estimated fetal weight and 2 year-old weight z-score in girls, and the early and middle stage of pregnancy may be the windows of vulnerability. Apart from these findings, we did not find strong evidence for prenatal triclosan exposure in relation to fetal and early-childhood growth. SN - 1873-6750 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30064055/The_association_of_repeated_measurements_of_prenatal_exposure_to_triclosan_with_fetal_and_early_childhood_growth_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0160-4120(18)30463-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -