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Impact of mental resilience and perceived immune functioning on the severity of alcohol hangover.
BMC Res Notes 2018; 11(1):526BR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Recent research comparing hangover sensitive drinkers with hangover resistant drinkers has revealed that experiencing alcohol hangovers is associated with significantly poorer self-reported immune functioning (p < 0.0001). No significant difference between the groups was found on mental resilience. The objective of the current survey was to examine the association between hangover severity, perceived immune status, and mental resilience. N = 341 Dutch students, all hangover sensitive drinkers, completed an online survey. The Brief Resilience Scale was completed, and perceived immune functioning and overall hangover severity for their latest past month hangover were assessed.

RESULTS

Students consumed a mean (SD) of 12.3 (5.9) alcoholic drinks the evening before their latest hangover. A significant positive association was found between mental resilience and perceived immune functioning (r = 0.372, p = 0.000). No significant associations of hangover severity were found with mental resilience (r = - 0.010, p = 0.858), or perceived immune functioning (r = - 0.025, p = 0.645). Previous research revealed that hangover resistant and hangover sensitive drinkers report having significantly different levels of immune functioning, and that the immune system is involved in the development of alcohol hangover. These findings suggest that levels of mental resilience and perceived immune functioning are not related to the severity of hangovers in hangover sensitive drinkers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pharmacology, Utrecht University, Universiteitsweg 99, 3584 CG, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.Division of Pharmacology, Utrecht University, Universiteitsweg 99, 3584 CG, Utrecht, The Netherlands.Division of Pharmacology, Utrecht University, Universiteitsweg 99, 3584 CG, Utrecht, The Netherlands.Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University, Melbourne, Australia.Division of Pharmacology, Utrecht University, Universiteitsweg 99, 3584 CG, Utrecht, The Netherlands. j.c.verster@uu.nl. Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. j.c.verster@uu.nl. Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University, Melbourne, Australia. j.c.verster@uu.nl.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30064526

Citation

van de Loo, Aurora J A E., et al. "Impact of Mental Resilience and Perceived Immune Functioning On the Severity of Alcohol Hangover." BMC Research Notes, vol. 11, no. 1, 2018, p. 526.
van de Loo AJAE, van Schrojenstein Lantman M, Mackus M, et al. Impact of mental resilience and perceived immune functioning on the severity of alcohol hangover. BMC Res Notes. 2018;11(1):526.
van de Loo, A. J. A. E., van Schrojenstein Lantman, M., Mackus, M., Scholey, A., & Verster, J. C. (2018). Impact of mental resilience and perceived immune functioning on the severity of alcohol hangover. BMC Research Notes, 11(1), p. 526. doi:10.1186/s13104-018-3659-0.
van de Loo AJAE, et al. Impact of Mental Resilience and Perceived Immune Functioning On the Severity of Alcohol Hangover. BMC Res Notes. 2018 Jul 31;11(1):526. PubMed PMID: 30064526.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of mental resilience and perceived immune functioning on the severity of alcohol hangover. AU - van de Loo,Aurora J A E, AU - van Schrojenstein Lantman,Marith, AU - Mackus,Marlou, AU - Scholey,Andrew, AU - Verster,Joris C, Y1 - 2018/07/31/ PY - 2018/06/14/received PY - 2018/07/27/accepted PY - 2018/8/2/entrez PY - 2018/8/2/pubmed PY - 2019/1/5/medline KW - Alcohol KW - Hangover KW - Mental resilience KW - Perceived immune functioning KW - Severity SP - 526 EP - 526 JF - BMC research notes JO - BMC Res Notes VL - 11 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Recent research comparing hangover sensitive drinkers with hangover resistant drinkers has revealed that experiencing alcohol hangovers is associated with significantly poorer self-reported immune functioning (p < 0.0001). No significant difference between the groups was found on mental resilience. The objective of the current survey was to examine the association between hangover severity, perceived immune status, and mental resilience. N = 341 Dutch students, all hangover sensitive drinkers, completed an online survey. The Brief Resilience Scale was completed, and perceived immune functioning and overall hangover severity for their latest past month hangover were assessed. RESULTS: Students consumed a mean (SD) of 12.3 (5.9) alcoholic drinks the evening before their latest hangover. A significant positive association was found between mental resilience and perceived immune functioning (r = 0.372, p = 0.000). No significant associations of hangover severity were found with mental resilience (r = - 0.010, p = 0.858), or perceived immune functioning (r = - 0.025, p = 0.645). Previous research revealed that hangover resistant and hangover sensitive drinkers report having significantly different levels of immune functioning, and that the immune system is involved in the development of alcohol hangover. These findings suggest that levels of mental resilience and perceived immune functioning are not related to the severity of hangovers in hangover sensitive drinkers. SN - 1756-0500 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30064526/Impact_of_mental_resilience_and_perceived_immune_functioning_on_the_severity_of_alcohol_hangover_ L2 - https://bmcresnotes.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13104-018-3659-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -