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The role of prenatal maternal stress in the development of childhood anxiety symptomatology: The QF2011 Queensland Flood Study.
Dev Psychopathol. 2018 08; 30(3):995-1007.DP

Abstract

It is possible that findings suggesting a link between prenatal maternal stress (PNMS) and anxiety symptoms in offspring are confounded by postnatal and/or shared mother-child heritability effects. Following exposure to a natural disaster, the Queensland Flood Study investigated the unique and additive effects of various types of disaster-related PNMS (objective hardship, cognitive appraisal, and subjective distress) on childhood anxiety symptomatology (internalizing and/or anxiety symptom measures). Timing of flood exposure during pregnancy and child sex were examined as potential moderators. After controlling for maternal psychosocial factors, greater objective hardship as a result of the floods was significantly associated with greater anxiety symptoms (N = 114) and marginally associated with greater internalizing behaviors (N = 115). Earlier timing of the flood in pregnancy was associated with greater anxiety symptoms. No such associations were found between any PNMS measure and teacher-rated child internalizing behaviors (N = 90). Sex and timing did not moderate associations. Our findings suggest that, in isolation, increased maternal hardship due to exposure to an independent stressor, during pregnancy, may have a programming effect on childhood anxiety symptoms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Mater Research Institute.Mater Research Institute.Mater Research Institute.Douglas Mental Health University Institute.Mater Research Institute.Douglas Mental Health University Institute.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30068409

Citation

McLean, Mia A., et al. "The Role of Prenatal Maternal Stress in the Development of Childhood Anxiety Symptomatology: the QF2011 Queensland Flood Study." Development and Psychopathology, vol. 30, no. 3, 2018, pp. 995-1007.
McLean MA, Cobham VE, Simcock G, et al. The role of prenatal maternal stress in the development of childhood anxiety symptomatology: The QF2011 Queensland Flood Study. Dev Psychopathol. 2018;30(3):995-1007.
McLean, M. A., Cobham, V. E., Simcock, G., Elgbeili, G., Kildea, S., & King, S. (2018). The role of prenatal maternal stress in the development of childhood anxiety symptomatology: The QF2011 Queensland Flood Study. Development and Psychopathology, 30(3), 995-1007. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954579418000408
McLean MA, et al. The Role of Prenatal Maternal Stress in the Development of Childhood Anxiety Symptomatology: the QF2011 Queensland Flood Study. Dev Psychopathol. 2018;30(3):995-1007. PubMed PMID: 30068409.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The role of prenatal maternal stress in the development of childhood anxiety symptomatology: The QF2011 Queensland Flood Study. AU - McLean,Mia A, AU - Cobham,Vanessa E, AU - Simcock,Gabrielle, AU - Elgbeili,Guillaume, AU - Kildea,Sue, AU - King,Suzanne, PY - 2018/8/3/entrez PY - 2018/8/3/pubmed PY - 2018/11/1/medline SP - 995 EP - 1007 JF - Development and psychopathology JO - Dev Psychopathol VL - 30 IS - 3 N2 - It is possible that findings suggesting a link between prenatal maternal stress (PNMS) and anxiety symptoms in offspring are confounded by postnatal and/or shared mother-child heritability effects. Following exposure to a natural disaster, the Queensland Flood Study investigated the unique and additive effects of various types of disaster-related PNMS (objective hardship, cognitive appraisal, and subjective distress) on childhood anxiety symptomatology (internalizing and/or anxiety symptom measures). Timing of flood exposure during pregnancy and child sex were examined as potential moderators. After controlling for maternal psychosocial factors, greater objective hardship as a result of the floods was significantly associated with greater anxiety symptoms (N = 114) and marginally associated with greater internalizing behaviors (N = 115). Earlier timing of the flood in pregnancy was associated with greater anxiety symptoms. No such associations were found between any PNMS measure and teacher-rated child internalizing behaviors (N = 90). Sex and timing did not moderate associations. Our findings suggest that, in isolation, increased maternal hardship due to exposure to an independent stressor, during pregnancy, may have a programming effect on childhood anxiety symptoms. SN - 1469-2198 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30068409/The_role_of_prenatal_maternal_stress_in_the_development_of_childhood_anxiety_symptomatology:_The_QF2011_Queensland_Flood_Study_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0954579418000408/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -