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Vegetarian diet and blood pressure in a hospital-base study.
Ci Ji Yi Xue Za Zhi. 2018 Jul-Sep; 30(3):176-180.CJ

Abstract

Objective

Previous studies have reported that a vegetarian diet may lower blood pressure (BP), but the effect of diet on BP in asymptomatic participants with proteinuria is unknown. We examined the association of diet and BP in individuals with or without proteinuria.

Materials and Methods

This cross-sectional study analyzed data from participants who were more than 40 years old and received physical checkups at Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital from September 5, 2005, to December 31, 2016. Diets were assessed at baseline by a self-reported questionnaire and categorized as vegan, lacto-ovo vegetarian, or omnivore. There were 2818 (7.7%) vegans, 5616 (15.3%) lacto-ovo vegetarians, and 28,183 (77.0%) omnivores. The effect of different parameters on BP was determined using a multivariate multiple linear regression model with no intercept, with control for important characteristics and lifestyle confounders.

Results

The vegan group had a lower mean systolic BP (-3.87 mmHg, P < 0.001) and diastolic BP (-2.48 mmHg, P < 0.001) than the omnivore group. Participants with proteinuria had a higher systolic BP (4.26 mmHg, P < 0.001) and diastolic BP (2.15 mmHg, P < 0.001) than those without proteinuria. Interaction analysis indicated that vegan participants with proteinuria had a lower systolic BP (-2.73 mmHg, P = 0.046) and diastolic BP (-2.54 mmHg, P = 0.013) than other participants with proteinuria. However, individuals in the lacto-ovo group with proteinuria had a BP similar to other participants with proteinuria.

Conclusions

A vegan diet was associated with lower BP in asymptomatic participants with proteinuria. This diet could be a nonpharmacologic method to reduce BP.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, New Taipei, Taiwan.Department of Nephrology, Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, New Taipei, Taiwan.Department of Nephrology, Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, New Taipei, Taiwan. School of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30069127

Citation

Liu, Hao-Wen, et al. "Vegetarian Diet and Blood Pressure in a Hospital-base Study." Ci Ji Yi Xue Za Zhi = Tzu-chi Medical Journal, vol. 30, no. 3, 2018, pp. 176-180.
Liu HW, Liu JS, Kuo KL. Vegetarian diet and blood pressure in a hospital-base study. Ci Ji Yi Xue Za Zhi. 2018;30(3):176-180.
Liu, H. W., Liu, J. S., & Kuo, K. L. (2018). Vegetarian diet and blood pressure in a hospital-base study. Ci Ji Yi Xue Za Zhi = Tzu-chi Medical Journal, 30(3), 176-180. https://doi.org/10.4103/tcmj.tcmj_91_17
Liu HW, Liu JS, Kuo KL. Vegetarian Diet and Blood Pressure in a Hospital-base Study. Ci Ji Yi Xue Za Zhi. 2018 Jul-Sep;30(3):176-180. PubMed PMID: 30069127.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vegetarian diet and blood pressure in a hospital-base study. AU - Liu,Hao-Wen, AU - Liu,Jia-Sin, AU - Kuo,Ko-Lin, PY - 2018/8/3/entrez PY - 2018/8/3/pubmed PY - 2018/8/3/medline KW - Early chronic kidney disease KW - Hypertension KW - Proteinuria KW - Vegetarian diet SP - 176 EP - 180 JF - Ci ji yi xue za zhi = Tzu-chi medical journal JO - Ci Ji Yi Xue Za Zhi VL - 30 IS - 3 N2 - Objective: Previous studies have reported that a vegetarian diet may lower blood pressure (BP), but the effect of diet on BP in asymptomatic participants with proteinuria is unknown. We examined the association of diet and BP in individuals with or without proteinuria. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed data from participants who were more than 40 years old and received physical checkups at Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital from September 5, 2005, to December 31, 2016. Diets were assessed at baseline by a self-reported questionnaire and categorized as vegan, lacto-ovo vegetarian, or omnivore. There were 2818 (7.7%) vegans, 5616 (15.3%) lacto-ovo vegetarians, and 28,183 (77.0%) omnivores. The effect of different parameters on BP was determined using a multivariate multiple linear regression model with no intercept, with control for important characteristics and lifestyle confounders. Results: The vegan group had a lower mean systolic BP (-3.87 mmHg, P < 0.001) and diastolic BP (-2.48 mmHg, P < 0.001) than the omnivore group. Participants with proteinuria had a higher systolic BP (4.26 mmHg, P < 0.001) and diastolic BP (2.15 mmHg, P < 0.001) than those without proteinuria. Interaction analysis indicated that vegan participants with proteinuria had a lower systolic BP (-2.73 mmHg, P = 0.046) and diastolic BP (-2.54 mmHg, P = 0.013) than other participants with proteinuria. However, individuals in the lacto-ovo group with proteinuria had a BP similar to other participants with proteinuria. Conclusions: A vegan diet was associated with lower BP in asymptomatic participants with proteinuria. This diet could be a nonpharmacologic method to reduce BP. SN - 1016-3190 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30069127/Vegetarian_diet_and_blood_pressure_in_a_hospital_base_study_ L2 - http://www.tcmjmed.com/article.asp?issn=1016-3190;year=2018;volume=30;issue=3;spage=176;epage=180;aulast=Liu DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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