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Epidemiological aspects of travel-related systemic endemic mycoses: a GeoSentinel analysis, 1997-2017.
J Travel Med. 2018 08 01; 25(1)JT

Abstract

Background

International travel has increased in the past few decades, placing more travellers at risk of acquiring systemic endemic mycoses. There are limited published data on systemic endemic mycoses among international travellers. We report epidemiological characteristics of non-migrant, international travellers who acquired systemic endemic mycoses during travel.

Methods

We analysed records of non-migrant international travellers with a confirmed diagnosis of histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, paracoccidioidomycosis, blastomycosis or talaromycosis reported from 1997 through 2017 to GeoSentinel, a global surveillance network now consisting of 70 travel or tropical medicine centres in 31 countries.

Results

Sixty-nine records met the inclusion criteria. Histoplasmosis was most frequently reported; the 51 travellers with histoplasmosis had the lowest median age (30 years; range: 8-85) and shortest median duration of travel (12 days; range: 5-154). Coccidioidomycosis was reported in 14 travellers; travellers with coccidioidomycosis were older (median 62 years; range: 22-78) and had the longest median number of days between return from travel and presentation to a GeoSentinel site (55 days; range: 17-273). Almost all travellers with coccidioidomycosis were exposed in the USA. Other systemic endemic mycoses were less frequently reported, including blastomycosis (three travellers) and talaromycosis (one traveller).

Conclusions

Although relatively rare, systemic endemic mycoses should be considered as potential travel-related infections in non-migrant international travellers. Epidemiological exposures should be used to guide diagnostic evaluations and treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Clinical Infectious Diseases and German Center for Infection Research Tuberculosis Unit, Research Center Borstel, Leibniz Lung Center, Borstel, Germany.Travelers' Health Branch, Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA, USA.Travelers' Health Branch, Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA, USA.Section of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, 1st Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. Department of Clinical Research, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany.Center of Tropical Medicine and Travel Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Division of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.J. D. MacLean Centre for Tropical Diseases, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.National Referral Unit for Tropical Diseases, Infectious Diseases Department, Ramon y Cajal University Hospital, Madrid, Spain.Tropical Medicine Department, University Hospital Center, Bordeaux, France.Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.National Referral Unit for Tropical and Travel Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Universitario La Paz-Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.The Center for Geographic Medicine and Internal Medicine 'C' Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel HaShomer, and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.Méditerranée Infection, Faculté de Médecine et de Pharmacie, Aix-Marseille-Université, Marseille, France.Department of Clinical Sciences, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium.Section of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, 1st Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.Division of Clinical Infectious Diseases and German Center for Infection Research Tuberculosis Unit, Research Center Borstel, Leibniz Lung Center, Borstel, Germany. International Health/Infectious Diseases, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany. Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.Department of Global Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30085265

Citation

Salzer, Helmut J F., et al. "Epidemiological Aspects of Travel-related Systemic Endemic Mycoses: a GeoSentinel Analysis, 1997-2017." Journal of Travel Medicine, vol. 25, no. 1, 2018.
Salzer HJF, Stoney RJ, Angelo KM, et al. Epidemiological aspects of travel-related systemic endemic mycoses: a GeoSentinel analysis, 1997-2017. J Travel Med. 2018;25(1).
Salzer, H. J. F., Stoney, R. J., Angelo, K. M., Rolling, T., Grobusch, M. P., Libman, M., López-Vélez, R., Duvignaud, A., Ásgeirsson, H., Crespillo-Andújar, C., Schwartz, E., Gautret, P., Bottieau, E., Jordan, S., Lange, C., & Hamer, D. H. (2018). Epidemiological aspects of travel-related systemic endemic mycoses: a GeoSentinel analysis, 1997-2017. Journal of Travel Medicine, 25(1). https://doi.org/10.1093/jtm/tay055
Salzer HJF, et al. Epidemiological Aspects of Travel-related Systemic Endemic Mycoses: a GeoSentinel Analysis, 1997-2017. J Travel Med. 2018 08 1;25(1) PubMed PMID: 30085265.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiological aspects of travel-related systemic endemic mycoses: a GeoSentinel analysis, 1997-2017. AU - Salzer,Helmut J F, AU - Stoney,Rhett J, AU - Angelo,Kristina M, AU - Rolling,Thierry, AU - Grobusch,Martin P, AU - Libman,Michael, AU - López-Vélez,Rogelio, AU - Duvignaud,Alexandre, AU - Ásgeirsson,Hilmir, AU - Crespillo-Andújar,Clara, AU - Schwartz,Eli, AU - Gautret,Philippe, AU - Bottieau,Emmanuel, AU - Jordan,Sabine, AU - Lange,Christoph, AU - Hamer,Davidson H, AU - ,, PY - 2018/05/23/received PY - 2018/07/15/accepted PY - 2018/8/8/entrez PY - 2018/8/8/pubmed PY - 2019/7/16/medline JF - Journal of travel medicine JO - J Travel Med VL - 25 IS - 1 N2 - Background: International travel has increased in the past few decades, placing more travellers at risk of acquiring systemic endemic mycoses. There are limited published data on systemic endemic mycoses among international travellers. We report epidemiological characteristics of non-migrant, international travellers who acquired systemic endemic mycoses during travel. Methods: We analysed records of non-migrant international travellers with a confirmed diagnosis of histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, paracoccidioidomycosis, blastomycosis or talaromycosis reported from 1997 through 2017 to GeoSentinel, a global surveillance network now consisting of 70 travel or tropical medicine centres in 31 countries. Results: Sixty-nine records met the inclusion criteria. Histoplasmosis was most frequently reported; the 51 travellers with histoplasmosis had the lowest median age (30 years; range: 8-85) and shortest median duration of travel (12 days; range: 5-154). Coccidioidomycosis was reported in 14 travellers; travellers with coccidioidomycosis were older (median 62 years; range: 22-78) and had the longest median number of days between return from travel and presentation to a GeoSentinel site (55 days; range: 17-273). Almost all travellers with coccidioidomycosis were exposed in the USA. Other systemic endemic mycoses were less frequently reported, including blastomycosis (three travellers) and talaromycosis (one traveller). Conclusions: Although relatively rare, systemic endemic mycoses should be considered as potential travel-related infections in non-migrant international travellers. Epidemiological exposures should be used to guide diagnostic evaluations and treatment. SN - 1708-8305 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30085265/Epidemiological_aspects_of_travel_related_systemic_endemic_mycoses:_a_GeoSentinel_analysis_1997_2017_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jtm/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jtm/tay055 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -