Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Assessment of microplastics derived from mariculture in Xiangshan Bay, China.
Environ Pollut. 2018 Nov; 242(Pt B):1146-1156.EP

Abstract

Mariculture activities including enclosure, raft and cage cultures employ a variety of plastic gear such as fishing nets, buoyant material and net cages. The plastic gear poses a potential source of microplastics to the coastal environment, but relevant data on the impacts of mariculture are still limited. To this end, a semi-enclosed narrow bay (i.e., Xiangshan Bay, China) with a long-term mariculture history was investigated to assess how mariculture activities affect microplastics in seawater and sediment. The results indicated that mariculture-derived microplastics accounted for approximately 55.7% and 36.8% of the microplastics in seawater and sediment, respectively. The average microplastic abundances of seawater and sediment were 8.9 ± 4.7 (mean ± SD, n = 18) items/m3 seawater and 1739 ± 2153 (n = 18) items/kg sediment, respectively. The types of mariculture-derived microplastics included polyethylene (PE) foam, PE nets, PE film, polypropylene (PP) rope, polystyrene (PS) foam and rubber. PE foam had the highest proportion (38.6%) in the seawater samples. High usage rates and the porous structure of PE foam led to the high abundance. The average microplastic sizes of seawater and sediment are 1.54 ± 1.53 mm and 1.33 ± 1.69 mm, respectively. The spatial variations in the abundance and size of microplastics implied that the mariculture-derived microplastics in Xiangshan Bay were transported along the Bay to the open sea. The results of this study indicate that mariculture activity can be a significant source of microplastics. Further research is required to investigate how the high microplastic abundance in mariculture zone affects marine organisms, especially cultured seafood.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Architectural, Civil Engineering and Environment, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315211, PR China.Faculty of Architectural, Civil Engineering and Environment, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315211, PR China.Faculty of Architectural, Civil Engineering and Environment, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315211, PR China.Faculty of Architectural, Civil Engineering and Environment, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315211, PR China.Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315211, PR China.Faculty of Architectural, Civil Engineering and Environment, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315211, PR China. Electronic address: yuxubiao@nbu.edu.cn.Faculty of Architectural, Civil Engineering and Environment, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315211, PR China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30099319

Citation

Chen, Minglong, et al. "Assessment of Microplastics Derived From Mariculture in Xiangshan Bay, China." Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987), vol. 242, no. Pt B, 2018, pp. 1146-1156.
Chen M, Jin M, Tao P, et al. Assessment of microplastics derived from mariculture in Xiangshan Bay, China. Environ Pollut. 2018;242(Pt B):1146-1156.
Chen, M., Jin, M., Tao, P., Wang, Z., Xie, W., Yu, X., & Wang, K. (2018). Assessment of microplastics derived from mariculture in Xiangshan Bay, China. Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987), 242(Pt B), 1146-1156. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2018.07.133
Chen M, et al. Assessment of Microplastics Derived From Mariculture in Xiangshan Bay, China. Environ Pollut. 2018;242(Pt B):1146-1156. PubMed PMID: 30099319.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Assessment of microplastics derived from mariculture in Xiangshan Bay, China. AU - Chen,Minglong, AU - Jin,Meng, AU - Tao,Peiran, AU - Wang,Zheng, AU - Xie,Weiping, AU - Yu,Xubiao, AU - Wang,Kan, Y1 - 2018/08/01/ PY - 2018/05/19/received PY - 2018/07/13/revised PY - 2018/07/31/accepted PY - 2018/8/14/pubmed PY - 2018/11/8/medline PY - 2018/8/13/entrez KW - Coastal water KW - Marine debris KW - Nearshore KW - Pollution KW - Sediment SP - 1146 EP - 1156 JF - Environmental pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) JO - Environ. Pollut. VL - 242 IS - Pt B N2 - Mariculture activities including enclosure, raft and cage cultures employ a variety of plastic gear such as fishing nets, buoyant material and net cages. The plastic gear poses a potential source of microplastics to the coastal environment, but relevant data on the impacts of mariculture are still limited. To this end, a semi-enclosed narrow bay (i.e., Xiangshan Bay, China) with a long-term mariculture history was investigated to assess how mariculture activities affect microplastics in seawater and sediment. The results indicated that mariculture-derived microplastics accounted for approximately 55.7% and 36.8% of the microplastics in seawater and sediment, respectively. The average microplastic abundances of seawater and sediment were 8.9 ± 4.7 (mean ± SD, n = 18) items/m3 seawater and 1739 ± 2153 (n = 18) items/kg sediment, respectively. The types of mariculture-derived microplastics included polyethylene (PE) foam, PE nets, PE film, polypropylene (PP) rope, polystyrene (PS) foam and rubber. PE foam had the highest proportion (38.6%) in the seawater samples. High usage rates and the porous structure of PE foam led to the high abundance. The average microplastic sizes of seawater and sediment are 1.54 ± 1.53 mm and 1.33 ± 1.69 mm, respectively. The spatial variations in the abundance and size of microplastics implied that the mariculture-derived microplastics in Xiangshan Bay were transported along the Bay to the open sea. The results of this study indicate that mariculture activity can be a significant source of microplastics. Further research is required to investigate how the high microplastic abundance in mariculture zone affects marine organisms, especially cultured seafood. SN - 1873-6424 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30099319/Assessment_of_microplastics_derived_from_mariculture_in_Xiangshan_Bay_China_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0269-7491(18)32247-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -