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Conventional Ultrasound, Immunohistochemical Factors and BRAFV600E Mutation in Predicting Central Cervical Lymph Node Metastasis of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma.
Ultrasound Med Biol. 2018 11; 44(11):2296-2306.UM

Abstract

The study was aimed at evaluating the correlation between central cervical lymph node metastasis (CLNM) in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) patients and ultrasound (US) features, immunohistochemical factors and BRAFV600E mutation. A total of 225 consecutive patients (225 PTCs) who had undergone surgery were included. All PTCs were pre-operatively analysed by US with respect to size, components, echogenicity, shape, margins, microcalcification, multiple cancers or not, internal vascularity and capsule contact or involvement. The presence of four immunohistochemical factors, including cytokeratin 19, human bone marrow endothelial cell 1, galectin-3 and thyroid peroxidase, and BRAFV600E mutation was also evaluated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the risk factors for central CLNM, and a risk model was established. Pathologically, 44% (99/225) of the PTCs had central CLNMs. Multivariate analysis revealed that size ≤10mm, microcalcification, internal vascularity, capsule contact or involvement and BRAFV600E mutation were independent risk factors for central CLNM. The risk score for central CLNM was calculated as follows: risk score = 1.5 × (if lesion size ≤10 mm) + 1.9 × (if microcalcification) + 0.8 × (if internal flow) + 3.0 × (if capsule contact or involvement) + 1.5 × (if BRAFV600E mutation). The rating result was divided into six stages, and the relevant risk rates of central CLNM were 0% (0/1), 0% (0/22), 7.4% (4/54), 48.6% (34/70), 71.2% (42/59) and 100% (19/19), respectively. In conclusion, PTC ≤10mm, microcalcification, internal vascularity, capsule contact or involvement and BRAFV600E mutation are risk factors for central CLNM. The risk model may be useful in treatment planning and management of patients with PTCs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Ultrasound, The Affiliated Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Shanghai, China; Department of Medical Ultrasound, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Ultrasound Research and Education Institute, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Thyroid Institute, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Shanghai Center for Thyroid Disease, Shanghai, China; Department of Medical Ultrasound, Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.Department of Medical Ultrasound, The Affiliated Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Shanghai, China; Department of Medical Ultrasound, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Ultrasound Research and Education Institute, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Thyroid Institute, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Shanghai Center for Thyroid Disease, Shanghai, China.Department of Medical Ultrasound, The Affiliated Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Shanghai, China; Department of Medical Ultrasound, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Ultrasound Research and Education Institute, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Thyroid Institute, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Shanghai Center for Thyroid Disease, Shanghai, China.Department of Medical Ultrasound, The Affiliated Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Shanghai, China; Department of Medical Ultrasound, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Ultrasound Research and Education Institute, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Thyroid Institute, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Shanghai Center for Thyroid Disease, Shanghai, China.Department of Medical Ultrasound, The Affiliated Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Shanghai, China; Department of Medical Ultrasound, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Ultrasound Research and Education Institute, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Thyroid Institute, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Shanghai Center for Thyroid Disease, Shanghai, China.Department of Medical Ultrasound, The Affiliated Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Shanghai, China; Department of Medical Ultrasound, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Ultrasound Research and Education Institute, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Thyroid Institute, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Shanghai Center for Thyroid Disease, Shanghai, China.Department of Pathology, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.Department of Pathology, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.Department of Medical Ultrasound, The Affiliated Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Shanghai, China; Department of Medical Ultrasound, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Ultrasound Research and Education Institute, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Thyroid Institute, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Shanghai Center for Thyroid Disease, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: xuhuixiong@126.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30100099

Citation

Chen, Jie, et al. "Conventional Ultrasound, Immunohistochemical Factors and BRAFV600E Mutation in Predicting Central Cervical Lymph Node Metastasis of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma." Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, vol. 44, no. 11, 2018, pp. 2296-2306.
Chen J, Li XL, Zhao CK, et al. Conventional Ultrasound, Immunohistochemical Factors and BRAFV600E Mutation in Predicting Central Cervical Lymph Node Metastasis of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma. Ultrasound Med Biol. 2018;44(11):2296-2306.
Chen, J., Li, X. L., Zhao, C. K., Wang, D., Wang, Q., Li, M. X., Wei, Q., Ji, G., & Xu, H. X. (2018). Conventional Ultrasound, Immunohistochemical Factors and BRAFV600E Mutation in Predicting Central Cervical Lymph Node Metastasis of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma. Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 44(11), 2296-2306. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2018.06.020
Chen J, et al. Conventional Ultrasound, Immunohistochemical Factors and BRAFV600E Mutation in Predicting Central Cervical Lymph Node Metastasis of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma. Ultrasound Med Biol. 2018;44(11):2296-2306. PubMed PMID: 30100099.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Conventional Ultrasound, Immunohistochemical Factors and BRAFV600E Mutation in Predicting Central Cervical Lymph Node Metastasis of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma. AU - Chen,Jie, AU - Li,Xiao-Long, AU - Zhao,Chong-Ke, AU - Wang,Dan, AU - Wang,Qiao, AU - Li,Ming-Xu, AU - Wei,Qing, AU - Ji,Guo, AU - Xu,Hui-Xiong, Y1 - 2018/08/10/ PY - 2018/01/29/received PY - 2018/05/28/revised PY - 2018/06/29/accepted PY - 2018/8/14/pubmed PY - 2019/2/12/medline PY - 2018/8/14/entrez KW - BRAF(V600E) mutation KW - CK19 KW - Central cervical lymph node metastases KW - Galectin-3 KW - Human bone marrow endothelial cell-1 KW - Papillary thyroid carcinoma KW - Thyroid peroxidase SP - 2296 EP - 2306 JF - Ultrasound in medicine & biology JO - Ultrasound Med Biol VL - 44 IS - 11 N2 - The study was aimed at evaluating the correlation between central cervical lymph node metastasis (CLNM) in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) patients and ultrasound (US) features, immunohistochemical factors and BRAFV600E mutation. A total of 225 consecutive patients (225 PTCs) who had undergone surgery were included. All PTCs were pre-operatively analysed by US with respect to size, components, echogenicity, shape, margins, microcalcification, multiple cancers or not, internal vascularity and capsule contact or involvement. The presence of four immunohistochemical factors, including cytokeratin 19, human bone marrow endothelial cell 1, galectin-3 and thyroid peroxidase, and BRAFV600E mutation was also evaluated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the risk factors for central CLNM, and a risk model was established. Pathologically, 44% (99/225) of the PTCs had central CLNMs. Multivariate analysis revealed that size ≤10mm, microcalcification, internal vascularity, capsule contact or involvement and BRAFV600E mutation were independent risk factors for central CLNM. The risk score for central CLNM was calculated as follows: risk score = 1.5 × (if lesion size ≤10 mm) + 1.9 × (if microcalcification) + 0.8 × (if internal flow) + 3.0 × (if capsule contact or involvement) + 1.5 × (if BRAFV600E mutation). The rating result was divided into six stages, and the relevant risk rates of central CLNM were 0% (0/1), 0% (0/22), 7.4% (4/54), 48.6% (34/70), 71.2% (42/59) and 100% (19/19), respectively. In conclusion, PTC ≤10mm, microcalcification, internal vascularity, capsule contact or involvement and BRAFV600E mutation are risk factors for central CLNM. The risk model may be useful in treatment planning and management of patients with PTCs. SN - 1879-291X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30100099/Conventional_Ultrasound_Immunohistochemical_Factors_and_BRAFV600E_Mutation_in_Predicting_Central_Cervical_Lymph_Node_Metastasis_of_Papillary_Thyroid_Carcinoma_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0301-5629(18)30275-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -