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Riluzole and edaravone: A tale of two amyotrophic lateral sclerosis drugs.
Med Res Rev 2019; 39(2):733-748MR

Abstract

Over the past decades, a multitude of experimental drugs have been shown to delay disease progression in preclinical animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) but failed to show efficacy in human clinical trials or are still waiting for approval under Phase I-III trials. Riluzole, a glutamatergic neurotransmission inhibitor, is the only drug approved by the USA Food and Drug Administration for ALS treatment with modest benefits on survival. Recently, an antioxidant drug, edaravone, developed by Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma was found to be effective in halting ALS progression during early stages. The newly approved drug edaravone is a force multiplier for ALS treatment. This short report provides an overview of the two drugs that have been approved for ALS treatment and highlights an update on the timeline of drug development, how clinical trials were done, the outcome of these trials, primary endpoint, mechanism of actions, dosing information, administration, side effects, and storage procedures. Moreover, we also discussed the pressing issues and challenges of ALS clinical trials and drug developments as well as future outlook.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center of Physiology, Georg-August University, Goettingen, Germany. Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30101496

Citation

Jaiswal, Manoj Kumar. "Riluzole and Edaravone: a Tale of Two Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Drugs." Medicinal Research Reviews, vol. 39, no. 2, 2019, pp. 733-748.
Jaiswal MK. Riluzole and edaravone: A tale of two amyotrophic lateral sclerosis drugs. Med Res Rev. 2019;39(2):733-748.
Jaiswal, M. K. (2019). Riluzole and edaravone: A tale of two amyotrophic lateral sclerosis drugs. Medicinal Research Reviews, 39(2), pp. 733-748. doi:10.1002/med.21528.
Jaiswal MK. Riluzole and Edaravone: a Tale of Two Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Drugs. Med Res Rev. 2019;39(2):733-748. PubMed PMID: 30101496.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Riluzole and edaravone: A tale of two amyotrophic lateral sclerosis drugs. A1 - Jaiswal,Manoj Kumar, Y1 - 2018/08/12/ PY - 2018/04/01/received PY - 2018/07/01/revised PY - 2018/07/05/accepted PY - 2018/8/14/pubmed PY - 2019/6/18/medline PY - 2018/8/14/entrez KW - Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) KW - clinical trials KW - drug development KW - edaravone KW - riluzole SP - 733 EP - 748 JF - Medicinal research reviews JO - Med Res Rev VL - 39 IS - 2 N2 - Over the past decades, a multitude of experimental drugs have been shown to delay disease progression in preclinical animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) but failed to show efficacy in human clinical trials or are still waiting for approval under Phase I-III trials. Riluzole, a glutamatergic neurotransmission inhibitor, is the only drug approved by the USA Food and Drug Administration for ALS treatment with modest benefits on survival. Recently, an antioxidant drug, edaravone, developed by Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma was found to be effective in halting ALS progression during early stages. The newly approved drug edaravone is a force multiplier for ALS treatment. This short report provides an overview of the two drugs that have been approved for ALS treatment and highlights an update on the timeline of drug development, how clinical trials were done, the outcome of these trials, primary endpoint, mechanism of actions, dosing information, administration, side effects, and storage procedures. Moreover, we also discussed the pressing issues and challenges of ALS clinical trials and drug developments as well as future outlook. SN - 1098-1128 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30101496/Riluzole_and_edaravone:_A_tale_of_two_amyotrophic_lateral_sclerosis_drugs_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/med.21528 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -