Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Corals sustain growth but not skeletal density across the Florida Keys Reef Tract despite ongoing warming.
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 11; 24(11):5205-5217.GC

Abstract

Through the continuous growth of their carbonate skeletons, corals record information about past environmental conditions and their effect on colony fitness. Here, we characterize century-scale growth records of inner and outer reef corals across ~200 km of the Florida Keys Reef Tract (FKRT) using skeletal cores extracted from two ubiquitous reef-building species, Siderastrea siderea and Pseudodiploria strigosa. We find that corals across the FKRT have sustained extension and calcification rates over the past century but have experienced a long-term reduction in skeletal density, regardless of reef zone. Notably, P. strigosa colonies exhibit temporary reef zone-dependent reductions in extension rate corresponding to two known extreme temperature events in 1969-1970 and 1997-1998. We propose that the subtropical climate of the FKRT may buffer corals from chronic growth declines associated with climate warming, though the significant reduction in skeletal density may indicate underlying vulnerability to present and future trends in ocean acidification.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.Department of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.Department of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.Department of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Statistics and Operations Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.Department of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Curriculum for Environment and Ecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30102827

Citation

Rippe, John P., et al. "Corals Sustain Growth but Not Skeletal Density Across the Florida Keys Reef Tract Despite Ongoing Warming." Global Change Biology, vol. 24, no. 11, 2018, pp. 5205-5217.
Rippe JP, Baumann JH, De Leener DN, et al. Corals sustain growth but not skeletal density across the Florida Keys Reef Tract despite ongoing warming. Glob Chang Biol. 2018;24(11):5205-5217.
Rippe, J. P., Baumann, J. H., De Leener, D. N., Aichelman, H. E., Friedlander, E. B., Davies, S. W., & Castillo, K. D. (2018). Corals sustain growth but not skeletal density across the Florida Keys Reef Tract despite ongoing warming. Global Change Biology, 24(11), 5205-5217. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.14422
Rippe JP, et al. Corals Sustain Growth but Not Skeletal Density Across the Florida Keys Reef Tract Despite Ongoing Warming. Glob Chang Biol. 2018;24(11):5205-5217. PubMed PMID: 30102827.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Corals sustain growth but not skeletal density across the Florida Keys Reef Tract despite ongoing warming. AU - Rippe,John P, AU - Baumann,Justin H, AU - De Leener,Daphne N, AU - Aichelman,Hannah E, AU - Friedlander,Eric B, AU - Davies,Sarah W, AU - Castillo,Karl D, Y1 - 2018/09/19/ PY - 2018/04/10/received PY - 2018/07/11/revised PY - 2018/08/06/accepted PY - 2018/8/14/pubmed PY - 2019/2/5/medline PY - 2018/8/14/entrez KW - Caribbean KW - Coral reef KW - Florida keys KW - calcification KW - climate change KW - global warming KW - ocean acidification KW - sclerochronology SP - 5205 EP - 5217 JF - Global change biology JO - Glob Chang Biol VL - 24 IS - 11 N2 - Through the continuous growth of their carbonate skeletons, corals record information about past environmental conditions and their effect on colony fitness. Here, we characterize century-scale growth records of inner and outer reef corals across ~200 km of the Florida Keys Reef Tract (FKRT) using skeletal cores extracted from two ubiquitous reef-building species, Siderastrea siderea and Pseudodiploria strigosa. We find that corals across the FKRT have sustained extension and calcification rates over the past century but have experienced a long-term reduction in skeletal density, regardless of reef zone. Notably, P. strigosa colonies exhibit temporary reef zone-dependent reductions in extension rate corresponding to two known extreme temperature events in 1969-1970 and 1997-1998. We propose that the subtropical climate of the FKRT may buffer corals from chronic growth declines associated with climate warming, though the significant reduction in skeletal density may indicate underlying vulnerability to present and future trends in ocean acidification. SN - 1365-2486 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30102827/Corals_sustain_growth_but_not_skeletal_density_across_the_Florida_Keys_Reef_Tract_despite_ongoing_warming_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.14422 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -