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Lack of serological evidence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in virus exposed camel abattoir workers in Nigeria, 2016.
Euro Surveill. 2018 08; 23(32)ES

Abstract

BackgroundMiddle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a zoonotic threat of global public health concern and dromedary camels are the source of zoonotic infection. Although MERS-CoV is enzootic in dromedaries in Africa as well as the Middle East, zoonotic disease has not been reported in Africa. Methods: In an abattoir in Kano, Nigeria, we tested nasal swabs from camels and investigated 261 humans with repeated occupational exposure to camels, many of whom also reported drinking fresh camel milk (n = 138) or urine (n = 94) or using camel urine for medicinal purposes (n = 96). Results: Weekly MERS-CoV RNA detection in January-February 2016 ranged from 0-8.4% of camels sampled. None of the abattoir workers with exposure to camels had evidence of neutralising antibody to MERS-CoV. Conclusion: There is a need for more studies to investigate whether or not zoonotic transmission of MERS-CoV does take place in Africa.

Authors+Show Affiliations

These authors contributed equally to this work. School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.These authors contributed equally to this work. School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.Faculty of Clinical Sciences, Department of Surgery, Old Jebba Road, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria. These authors contributed equally to this work. School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.These authors contributed equally to this work. School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.Faculty of Clinical Sciences, Department of Surgery, Old Jebba Road, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria.School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.Department of Infectious Diseases, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, United States.School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30107872

Citation

So, Ray Ty, et al. "Lack of Serological Evidence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection in Virus Exposed Camel Abattoir Workers in Nigeria, 2016." Euro Surveillance : Bulletin Europeen Sur Les Maladies Transmissibles = European Communicable Disease Bulletin, vol. 23, no. 32, 2018.
So RT, Perera RA, Oladipo JO, et al. Lack of serological evidence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in virus exposed camel abattoir workers in Nigeria, 2016. Euro Surveill. 2018;23(32).
So, R. T., Perera, R. A., Oladipo, J. O., Chu, D. K., Kuranga, S. A., Chan, K. H., Lau, E. H., Cheng, S. M., Poon, L. L., Webby, R. J., & Peiris, M. (2018). Lack of serological evidence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in virus exposed camel abattoir workers in Nigeria, 2016. Euro Surveillance : Bulletin Europeen Sur Les Maladies Transmissibles = European Communicable Disease Bulletin, 23(32). https://doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2018.23.32.1800175
So RT, et al. Lack of Serological Evidence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection in Virus Exposed Camel Abattoir Workers in Nigeria, 2016. Euro Surveill. 2018;23(32) PubMed PMID: 30107872.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lack of serological evidence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in virus exposed camel abattoir workers in Nigeria, 2016. AU - So,Ray Ty, AU - Perera,Ranawaka Apm, AU - Oladipo,Jamiu O, AU - Chu,Daniel Kw, AU - Kuranga,Sulyman A, AU - Chan,Kin-Ho, AU - Lau,Eric Hy, AU - Cheng,Samuel Ms, AU - Poon,Leo Lm, AU - Webby,Richard J, AU - Peiris,Malik, PY - 2018/8/16/entrez PY - 2018/8/16/pubmed PY - 2019/9/26/medline KW - MERS KW - abattoir KW - camel KW - coronavirus KW - human KW - occupational exposure KW - serology JF - Euro surveillance : bulletin Europeen sur les maladies transmissibles = European communicable disease bulletin JO - Euro Surveill VL - 23 IS - 32 N2 - BackgroundMiddle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a zoonotic threat of global public health concern and dromedary camels are the source of zoonotic infection. Although MERS-CoV is enzootic in dromedaries in Africa as well as the Middle East, zoonotic disease has not been reported in Africa. Methods: In an abattoir in Kano, Nigeria, we tested nasal swabs from camels and investigated 261 humans with repeated occupational exposure to camels, many of whom also reported drinking fresh camel milk (n = 138) or urine (n = 94) or using camel urine for medicinal purposes (n = 96). Results: Weekly MERS-CoV RNA detection in January-February 2016 ranged from 0-8.4% of camels sampled. None of the abattoir workers with exposure to camels had evidence of neutralising antibody to MERS-CoV. Conclusion: There is a need for more studies to investigate whether or not zoonotic transmission of MERS-CoV does take place in Africa. SN - 1560-7917 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30107872/Lack_of_serological_evidence_of_Middle_East_respiratory_syndrome_coronavirus_infection_in_virus_exposed_camel_abattoir_workers_in_Nigeria_2016_ L2 - http://www.eurosurveillance.org/content/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2018.23.32.1800175 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -