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Source contributions to water-soluble organic carbon and water-insoluble organic carbon in PM2.5 during Spring Festival, heating and non-heating seasons.
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2018 Nov 30; 164:172-180.EE

Abstract

To investigate the influences of anthropogenic activities on carbon aerosols, especially on water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), PM2.5 samples were collected at an urban site in a northern city of China during Spring Festival (SF), heating season (HS), and non-heating season (NHS). Carbonaceous species and ions (Ca2+, SO42-, NO3-, etc.) were analyzed. Mass concentrations of WSOC and WSIC exhibited higher levels in SF and HS, and high WSOC/OC ratios (67.4%) on average were found. Stronger correlations between WSOC and K+, Cl- occurred in SF, which might due to contributions of firework emissions. Six major sources of PM2.5 were quantified by PMF model, which contributed in aerosol mass differently in different periods: biomass & firework burning exhibited higher contribution (11.2%) in SF; crustal dust accounted for 19.4% during NHS; secondary particles contributed most (41.0%) in HS; during SF and HS, coal combustion devoted more to aerosol mass. Contributions to WSOC were in the order of vehicular exhaust (41.0% of WSOC) > coal combustion (29.3%) > secondary formation (17.0%) > biomass & firework burning (12.7%). The 82.0% of WIOC were from coal combustion and the rest were devoted by vehicular exhaust. Obvious peaks of firework burning contributions to WSOC were observed on SF's Eve and Lantern Festival. Coal combustion contributed to organic carbons highly in SF and HS. Results implied that anthropogenic activities contributions, like firework burning and coal combustion, significantly influenced the levels of PM2.5 and WSOC.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Urban Ambient Air Particulate Matter Pollution Prevention and Control, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China.State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Urban Ambient Air Particulate Matter Pollution Prevention and Control, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China.State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Urban Ambient Air Particulate Matter Pollution Prevention and Control, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China. Electronic address: tianyingze@hotmail.com.State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Urban Ambient Air Particulate Matter Pollution Prevention and Control, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China. Electronic address: chengang007@outlook.com.State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Urban Ambient Air Particulate Matter Pollution Prevention and Control, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China.State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Urban Ambient Air Particulate Matter Pollution Prevention and Control, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China.Department of Physics, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, NV 89557, USA.State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Urban Ambient Air Particulate Matter Pollution Prevention and Control, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30114567

Citation

Wen, Jie, et al. "Source Contributions to Water-soluble Organic Carbon and Water-insoluble Organic Carbon in PM2.5 During Spring Festival, Heating and Non-heating Seasons." Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, vol. 164, 2018, pp. 172-180.
Wen J, Shi G, Tian Y, et al. Source contributions to water-soluble organic carbon and water-insoluble organic carbon in PM2.5 during Spring Festival, heating and non-heating seasons. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2018;164:172-180.
Wen, J., Shi, G., Tian, Y., Chen, G., Liu, J., Huang-Fu, Y., Ivey, C. E., & Feng, Y. (2018). Source contributions to water-soluble organic carbon and water-insoluble organic carbon in PM2.5 during Spring Festival, heating and non-heating seasons. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 164, 172-180. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoenv.2018.08.002
Wen J, et al. Source Contributions to Water-soluble Organic Carbon and Water-insoluble Organic Carbon in PM2.5 During Spring Festival, Heating and Non-heating Seasons. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2018 Nov 30;164:172-180. PubMed PMID: 30114567.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Source contributions to water-soluble organic carbon and water-insoluble organic carbon in PM2.5 during Spring Festival, heating and non-heating seasons. AU - Wen,Jie, AU - Shi,Guoliang, AU - Tian,Yingze, AU - Chen,Gang, AU - Liu,Jiayuan, AU - Huang-Fu,Yanqi, AU - Ivey,Cesunica E, AU - Feng,Yinchang, Y1 - 2018/08/13/ PY - 2018/05/23/received PY - 2018/07/29/revised PY - 2018/08/01/accepted PY - 2018/8/17/pubmed PY - 2018/12/26/medline PY - 2018/8/17/entrez KW - Chemical properties KW - PM(2.5) KW - Source apportionment KW - Temporal trends KW - WSOC SP - 172 EP - 180 JF - Ecotoxicology and environmental safety JO - Ecotoxicol. Environ. Saf. VL - 164 N2 - To investigate the influences of anthropogenic activities on carbon aerosols, especially on water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), PM2.5 samples were collected at an urban site in a northern city of China during Spring Festival (SF), heating season (HS), and non-heating season (NHS). Carbonaceous species and ions (Ca2+, SO42-, NO3-, etc.) were analyzed. Mass concentrations of WSOC and WSIC exhibited higher levels in SF and HS, and high WSOC/OC ratios (67.4%) on average were found. Stronger correlations between WSOC and K+, Cl- occurred in SF, which might due to contributions of firework emissions. Six major sources of PM2.5 were quantified by PMF model, which contributed in aerosol mass differently in different periods: biomass & firework burning exhibited higher contribution (11.2%) in SF; crustal dust accounted for 19.4% during NHS; secondary particles contributed most (41.0%) in HS; during SF and HS, coal combustion devoted more to aerosol mass. Contributions to WSOC were in the order of vehicular exhaust (41.0% of WSOC) > coal combustion (29.3%) > secondary formation (17.0%) > biomass & firework burning (12.7%). The 82.0% of WIOC were from coal combustion and the rest were devoted by vehicular exhaust. Obvious peaks of firework burning contributions to WSOC were observed on SF's Eve and Lantern Festival. Coal combustion contributed to organic carbons highly in SF and HS. Results implied that anthropogenic activities contributions, like firework burning and coal combustion, significantly influenced the levels of PM2.5 and WSOC. SN - 1090-2414 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30114567/Source_contributions_to_water_soluble_organic_carbon_and_water_insoluble_organic_carbon_in_PM2_5_during_Spring_Festival_heating_and_non_heating_seasons_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0147-6513(18)30736-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -