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Intersectional nativity and racial/ethnic disparities in human papillomavirus vaccination initiation among U.S. women: a national population-based study.
Cancer Causes Control. 2018 Oct; 29(10):927-936.CC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Overall, foreign-born women are less likely than U.S.-born women to have initiated human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. However, foreign-born women are a racially/ethnically diverse population, and race/ethnicity is an independent predictor of HPV vaccination.

METHODS

Using 2011-2015 National Health Interview Survey data, we used multivariable logistic regression to estimate odds ratios for foreign-born black, Latina, and Asian women compared to foreign-born white women and U.S.-born white women, adjusting for sociodemographic factors. We added socioeconomic factors followed by health care access indicators, which we conceptualized as potential mediators, to each model to assess whether they helped explain observed disparities.

RESULTS

Foreign-born Asian ([odds ratio=] 0.43; [95% confidence interval:] 0.29-0.65) and Latina (0.46; 0.32-0.68) women had significantly lower adjusted odds of initiating HPV vaccination compared to foreign-born white women. Foreign-born white (0.64; 0.45-0.90), black (0.44; 0.29, 0.67), Latina (0.29; 0.24-0.35), and Asian (0.28; 0.21-0.38) women had significantly lower adjusted odds of HPV vaccination initiation compared to U.S.-born white women. Socioeconomic factors only explained HPV vaccination initiation disparities between foreign-born Latina women and foreign-born and U.S.-born white women. Health care access indicators modestly explained disparities between foreign-born white, black, and Latina women and U.S.-born white women only.

CONCLUSIONS

We observed pronounced HPV vaccination initiation disparities among foreign-born women in relation to race/ethnicity and between foreign-born women from minoritized racial/ethnic backgrounds and U.S.-born white women. Research on nativity disparities in HPV vaccination should take into account race/ethnicity, and vice versa. Interventions that seek to facilitate HPV vaccination among foreign-born women are needed and should address the unique needs of those from minoritized racial/ethnic backgrounds to promote cancer equity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Kresge Building, 7th Floor, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. magenor@hsph.harvard.edu.Department of Women, Children and Family Health Science, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, Chicago, IL, USA.Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Kresge Building, 7th Floor, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of California San Francisco School of Nursing, San Francisco, CA, USA.Department of Health Behavior and Biological Sciences, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30120642

Citation

Agénor, Madina, et al. "Intersectional Nativity and Racial/ethnic Disparities in Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Initiation Among U.S. Women: a National Population-based Study." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 29, no. 10, 2018, pp. 927-936.
Agénor M, Abboud S, Delgadillo JG, et al. Intersectional nativity and racial/ethnic disparities in human papillomavirus vaccination initiation among U.S. women: a national population-based study. Cancer Causes Control. 2018;29(10):927-936.
Agénor, M., Abboud, S., Delgadillo, J. G., Pérez, A. E., Peitzmeier, S. M., & Borrero, S. (2018). Intersectional nativity and racial/ethnic disparities in human papillomavirus vaccination initiation among U.S. women: a national population-based study. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 29(10), 927-936. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-018-1069-1
Agénor M, et al. Intersectional Nativity and Racial/ethnic Disparities in Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Initiation Among U.S. Women: a National Population-based Study. Cancer Causes Control. 2018;29(10):927-936. PubMed PMID: 30120642.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intersectional nativity and racial/ethnic disparities in human papillomavirus vaccination initiation among U.S. women: a national population-based study. AU - Agénor,Madina, AU - Abboud,Sarah, AU - Delgadillo,Jazmine Garcia, AU - Pérez,Ashley E, AU - Peitzmeier,Sarah M, AU - Borrero,Sonya, Y1 - 2018/08/17/ PY - 2018/05/02/received PY - 2018/08/06/accepted PY - 2018/8/19/pubmed PY - 2018/11/27/medline PY - 2018/8/19/entrez KW - Health disparities KW - Human papillomavirus vaccination KW - Nativity status KW - Race/ethnicity KW - Women SP - 927 EP - 936 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 29 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Overall, foreign-born women are less likely than U.S.-born women to have initiated human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. However, foreign-born women are a racially/ethnically diverse population, and race/ethnicity is an independent predictor of HPV vaccination. METHODS: Using 2011-2015 National Health Interview Survey data, we used multivariable logistic regression to estimate odds ratios for foreign-born black, Latina, and Asian women compared to foreign-born white women and U.S.-born white women, adjusting for sociodemographic factors. We added socioeconomic factors followed by health care access indicators, which we conceptualized as potential mediators, to each model to assess whether they helped explain observed disparities. RESULTS: Foreign-born Asian ([odds ratio=] 0.43; [95% confidence interval:] 0.29-0.65) and Latina (0.46; 0.32-0.68) women had significantly lower adjusted odds of initiating HPV vaccination compared to foreign-born white women. Foreign-born white (0.64; 0.45-0.90), black (0.44; 0.29, 0.67), Latina (0.29; 0.24-0.35), and Asian (0.28; 0.21-0.38) women had significantly lower adjusted odds of HPV vaccination initiation compared to U.S.-born white women. Socioeconomic factors only explained HPV vaccination initiation disparities between foreign-born Latina women and foreign-born and U.S.-born white women. Health care access indicators modestly explained disparities between foreign-born white, black, and Latina women and U.S.-born white women only. CONCLUSIONS: We observed pronounced HPV vaccination initiation disparities among foreign-born women in relation to race/ethnicity and between foreign-born women from minoritized racial/ethnic backgrounds and U.S.-born white women. Research on nativity disparities in HPV vaccination should take into account race/ethnicity, and vice versa. Interventions that seek to facilitate HPV vaccination among foreign-born women are needed and should address the unique needs of those from minoritized racial/ethnic backgrounds to promote cancer equity. SN - 1573-7225 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30120642/Intersectional_nativity_and_racial/ethnic_disparities_in_human_papillomavirus_vaccination_initiation_among_U_S__women:_a_national_population_based_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-018-1069-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -