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Non-suicidal self-injury prevalence, course, and association with suicidal thoughts and behaviors in two large, representative samples of US Army soldiers.
Psychol Med. 2019 07; 49(9):1470-1480.PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) prospectively predicts suicidal thoughts and behaviors in civilian populations. Despite high rates of suicide among US military members, little is known about the prevalence and course of NSSI, or how NSSI relates to suicidal thoughts and behaviors, in military personnel.

METHODS

We conducted secondary analyses of two representative surveys of active-duty soldiers (N = 21 449) and newly enlisted soldiers (N = 38 507) from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

RESULTS

The lifetime prevalence of NSSI is 6.3% (1.2% 12-month prevalence) in active-duty soldiers and 7.9% (1.3% 12-month prevalence) in new soldiers. Demographic risk factors for lifetime NSSI include female sex, younger age, non-Hispanic white ethnicity, never having married, and lower educational attainment. The association of NSSI with temporally primary internalizing and externalizing disorders varies by service history (new v. active-duty soldiers) and gender (men v. women). In both active-duty and new soldiers, NSSI is associated with increased odds of subsequent onset of suicidal ideation [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.66-1.81] and suicide attempts (adjusted OR = 2.02-2.43), although not with the transition from ideation to attempt (adjusted OR = 0.92-1.36). Soldiers with a history of NSSI are more likely to have made multiple suicide attempts, compared with soldiers without NSSI.

CONCLUSIONS

NSSI is prevalent among US Army soldiers and is associated with significantly increased odds of later suicidal thoughts and behaviors, even after NSSI has resolved. Suicide risk assessments in military populations should screen for history of NSSI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology,University of Victoria,Victoria, BC,Canada.Department of Psychology,Harvard University,Cambridge, MA,USA.Department of Psychology,Harvard University,Cambridge, MA,USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30131080

Citation

Turner, Brianna J., et al. "Non-suicidal Self-injury Prevalence, Course, and Association With Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors in Two Large, Representative Samples of US Army Soldiers." Psychological Medicine, vol. 49, no. 9, 2019, pp. 1470-1480.
Turner BJ, Kleiman EM, Nock MK. Non-suicidal self-injury prevalence, course, and association with suicidal thoughts and behaviors in two large, representative samples of US Army soldiers. Psychol Med. 2019;49(9):1470-1480.
Turner, B. J., Kleiman, E. M., & Nock, M. K. (2019). Non-suicidal self-injury prevalence, course, and association with suicidal thoughts and behaviors in two large, representative samples of US Army soldiers. Psychological Medicine, 49(9), 1470-1480. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291718002015
Turner BJ, Kleiman EM, Nock MK. Non-suicidal Self-injury Prevalence, Course, and Association With Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors in Two Large, Representative Samples of US Army Soldiers. Psychol Med. 2019;49(9):1470-1480. PubMed PMID: 30131080.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Non-suicidal self-injury prevalence, course, and association with suicidal thoughts and behaviors in two large, representative samples of US Army soldiers. AU - Turner,Brianna J, AU - Kleiman,Evan M, AU - Nock,Matthew K, Y1 - 2018/08/22/ PY - 2018/8/23/pubmed PY - 2020/5/1/medline PY - 2018/8/23/entrez KW - Military KW - prevalence KW - risk KW - self-harm KW - soldier KW - suicide SP - 1470 EP - 1480 JF - Psychological medicine JO - Psychol Med VL - 49 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) prospectively predicts suicidal thoughts and behaviors in civilian populations. Despite high rates of suicide among US military members, little is known about the prevalence and course of NSSI, or how NSSI relates to suicidal thoughts and behaviors, in military personnel. METHODS: We conducted secondary analyses of two representative surveys of active-duty soldiers (N = 21 449) and newly enlisted soldiers (N = 38 507) from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS). RESULTS: The lifetime prevalence of NSSI is 6.3% (1.2% 12-month prevalence) in active-duty soldiers and 7.9% (1.3% 12-month prevalence) in new soldiers. Demographic risk factors for lifetime NSSI include female sex, younger age, non-Hispanic white ethnicity, never having married, and lower educational attainment. The association of NSSI with temporally primary internalizing and externalizing disorders varies by service history (new v. active-duty soldiers) and gender (men v. women). In both active-duty and new soldiers, NSSI is associated with increased odds of subsequent onset of suicidal ideation [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.66-1.81] and suicide attempts (adjusted OR = 2.02-2.43), although not with the transition from ideation to attempt (adjusted OR = 0.92-1.36). Soldiers with a history of NSSI are more likely to have made multiple suicide attempts, compared with soldiers without NSSI. CONCLUSIONS: NSSI is prevalent among US Army soldiers and is associated with significantly increased odds of later suicidal thoughts and behaviors, even after NSSI has resolved. Suicide risk assessments in military populations should screen for history of NSSI. SN - 1469-8978 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30131080/Non_suicidal_self_injury_prevalence_course_and_association_with_suicidal_thoughts_and_behaviors_in_two_large_representative_samples_of_US_Army_soldiers_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0033291718002015/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -