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Previous cannabis exposure modulates the acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on attentional salience and fear processing.
Exp Clin Psychopharmacol 2018; 26(6):582-598EC

Abstract

Cannabis can induce transient psychotic and anxiety symptoms and long-lasting disorders. The acute psychoactive effects of its main active ingredient, (-)-trans-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), may be modulated by previous cannabis exposure. Secondary data analyses tested whether modest previous cannabis exposure modulated the acute effects of Δ9-THC on attentional salience and emotional processing and their neurophysiological substrates. Twenty-four healthy men participated in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, repeated-measures, within-subject, Δ9-THC challenge study using fMRI. Compared with nonusers (NUs; n = 12; <5 lifetime cannabis joints smoked), abstinent-modest cannabis users (CUs; n = 12; 24.5 ± 9 lifetime cannabis joints smoked) showed less efficient attentional salience processing and recruited different/additional brain areas to process attentional salient and emotional stimuli (all ps ≤ .01). The Δ9-THC challenge disrupted attentional salience and emotional-processing-related brain activity and induced transient anxiety and psychotic symptoms (all ps ≤ .02). However, Δ9-THC-induced psychotic symptoms and attentional salience behavioral impairment were more pronounced in NUs compared with CUs (all ps ≤ .04). Also, NUs under Δ9-THC shifted toward recruitment of other brain areas to perform the tasks. Conversely, CUs were less affected by the acute challenge in an exposure-dependent manner, showing a neurophysiological pattern similar to that of NUs under placebo. Only in NUs, Δ9-THC-induced psychotic symptom and cognitive impairment severity was associated with a more pronounced neurophysiological alteration (all ps ≤ .048). In conclusion, CUs displayed residual effects of cannabis exposure but more blunted responses to the acute symptomatic, behavioral, and neurophysiological effects of Δ9-THC, which were more marked in NUs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London.Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London.Department of Neuroimaging, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London.Department of Neuroimaging, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London.Department of Neuroimaging, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London.Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30138003

Citation

Colizzi, Marco, et al. "Previous Cannabis Exposure Modulates the Acute Effects of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol On Attentional Salience and Fear Processing." Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, vol. 26, no. 6, 2018, pp. 582-598.
Colizzi M, McGuire P, Giampietro V, et al. Previous cannabis exposure modulates the acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on attentional salience and fear processing. Exp Clin Psychopharmacol. 2018;26(6):582-598.
Colizzi, M., McGuire, P., Giampietro, V., Williams, S., Brammer, M., & Bhattacharyya, S. (2018). Previous cannabis exposure modulates the acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on attentional salience and fear processing. Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, 26(6), pp. 582-598. doi:10.1037/pha0000221.
Colizzi M, et al. Previous Cannabis Exposure Modulates the Acute Effects of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol On Attentional Salience and Fear Processing. Exp Clin Psychopharmacol. 2018;26(6):582-598. PubMed PMID: 30138003.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Previous cannabis exposure modulates the acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on attentional salience and fear processing. AU - Colizzi,Marco, AU - McGuire,Philip, AU - Giampietro,Vincent, AU - Williams,Steve, AU - Brammer,Mick, AU - Bhattacharyya,Sagnik, Y1 - 2018/08/23/ PY - 2018/8/24/pubmed PY - 2019/1/19/medline PY - 2018/8/24/entrez SP - 582 EP - 598 JF - Experimental and clinical psychopharmacology JO - Exp Clin Psychopharmacol VL - 26 IS - 6 N2 - Cannabis can induce transient psychotic and anxiety symptoms and long-lasting disorders. The acute psychoactive effects of its main active ingredient, (-)-trans-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), may be modulated by previous cannabis exposure. Secondary data analyses tested whether modest previous cannabis exposure modulated the acute effects of Δ9-THC on attentional salience and emotional processing and their neurophysiological substrates. Twenty-four healthy men participated in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, repeated-measures, within-subject, Δ9-THC challenge study using fMRI. Compared with nonusers (NUs; n = 12; <5 lifetime cannabis joints smoked), abstinent-modest cannabis users (CUs; n = 12; 24.5 ± 9 lifetime cannabis joints smoked) showed less efficient attentional salience processing and recruited different/additional brain areas to process attentional salient and emotional stimuli (all ps ≤ .01). The Δ9-THC challenge disrupted attentional salience and emotional-processing-related brain activity and induced transient anxiety and psychotic symptoms (all ps ≤ .02). However, Δ9-THC-induced psychotic symptoms and attentional salience behavioral impairment were more pronounced in NUs compared with CUs (all ps ≤ .04). Also, NUs under Δ9-THC shifted toward recruitment of other brain areas to perform the tasks. Conversely, CUs were less affected by the acute challenge in an exposure-dependent manner, showing a neurophysiological pattern similar to that of NUs under placebo. Only in NUs, Δ9-THC-induced psychotic symptom and cognitive impairment severity was associated with a more pronounced neurophysiological alteration (all ps ≤ .048). In conclusion, CUs displayed residual effects of cannabis exposure but more blunted responses to the acute symptomatic, behavioral, and neurophysiological effects of Δ9-THC, which were more marked in NUs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved). SN - 1936-2293 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30138003/Previous_cannabis_exposure_modulates_the_acute_effects_of_delta_9_tetrahydrocannabinol_on_attentional_salience_and_fear_processing_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/pha/26/6/582 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -