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The Associations of Weight Status and Body Attitudes with Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms Across the First Year Postpartum.
Womens Health Issues 2018 Nov - Dec; 28(6):530-538WH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Postpartum depression and anxiety are prevalent in the first year after giving birth and can have problematic health outcomes for the mother and infant, although further research is required about the factors that contribute to their development. This study explored the trajectory of depressive and anxiety symptoms across the first postpartum year and their associations with body attitudes, body mass index, and weight retention.

METHODS

Participants were 467 women recruited during pregnancy via online forums, in parenting magazines, and at baby and children's markets, or from a large tertiary Australian hospital. Participants reported retrospectively on the prepregnancy period and provided data in early pregnancy (Baseline; M = 17.1 weeks pregnant), at 3 months postpartum (T1; M = 13.1 weeks after birth), 6 months postpartum (T2; M = 26.6 weeks after birth), and 12 months postpartum (T3; M = 52.8 weeks after birth).

RESULTS

Latent growth curve modelling revealed that, from T1 to T3, depressive symptoms significantly decreased, whereas anxiety symptoms did not change significantly. Demographic factors, weight retention, body mass index, and body attitudes at T1 did not significantly predict the course of depression and anxiety over time; however, greater postpartum weight retention and negative body attitudes at T1 predicted a more severe experience of both depression and anxiety at T3.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings emphasize the need to assess and monitor the risk factors that can have an adverse impact on postpartum women's psychological health. This finding is particularly important for women deemed to be at risk of problematic body image or weight issues so that health professionals can intervene, and better ensure the health of new mothers in the longer term.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychology, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria, Australia.Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.School of Psychology, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address: matthew.fuller-tyszkiewicz@deakin.edu.au.Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30139521

Citation

Hartley, Eliza, et al. "The Associations of Weight Status and Body Attitudes With Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms Across the First Year Postpartum." Women's Health Issues : Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health, vol. 28, no. 6, 2018, pp. 530-538.
Hartley E, Hill B, Bailey C, et al. The Associations of Weight Status and Body Attitudes with Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms Across the First Year Postpartum. Womens Health Issues. 2018;28(6):530-538.
Hartley, E., Hill, B., Bailey, C., Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, M., & Skouteris, H. (2018). The Associations of Weight Status and Body Attitudes with Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms Across the First Year Postpartum. Women's Health Issues : Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health, 28(6), pp. 530-538. doi:10.1016/j.whi.2018.07.002.
Hartley E, et al. The Associations of Weight Status and Body Attitudes With Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms Across the First Year Postpartum. Womens Health Issues. 2018;28(6):530-538. PubMed PMID: 30139521.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Associations of Weight Status and Body Attitudes with Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms Across the First Year Postpartum. AU - Hartley,Eliza, AU - Hill,Briony, AU - Bailey,Cate, AU - Fuller-Tyszkiewicz,Matthew, AU - Skouteris,Helen, Y1 - 2018/08/20/ PY - 2018/02/17/received PY - 2018/06/29/revised PY - 2018/07/11/accepted PY - 2018/8/25/pubmed PY - 2019/1/10/medline PY - 2018/8/25/entrez SP - 530 EP - 538 JF - Women's health issues : official publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health JO - Womens Health Issues VL - 28 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Postpartum depression and anxiety are prevalent in the first year after giving birth and can have problematic health outcomes for the mother and infant, although further research is required about the factors that contribute to their development. This study explored the trajectory of depressive and anxiety symptoms across the first postpartum year and their associations with body attitudes, body mass index, and weight retention. METHODS: Participants were 467 women recruited during pregnancy via online forums, in parenting magazines, and at baby and children's markets, or from a large tertiary Australian hospital. Participants reported retrospectively on the prepregnancy period and provided data in early pregnancy (Baseline; M = 17.1 weeks pregnant), at 3 months postpartum (T1; M = 13.1 weeks after birth), 6 months postpartum (T2; M = 26.6 weeks after birth), and 12 months postpartum (T3; M = 52.8 weeks after birth). RESULTS: Latent growth curve modelling revealed that, from T1 to T3, depressive symptoms significantly decreased, whereas anxiety symptoms did not change significantly. Demographic factors, weight retention, body mass index, and body attitudes at T1 did not significantly predict the course of depression and anxiety over time; however, greater postpartum weight retention and negative body attitudes at T1 predicted a more severe experience of both depression and anxiety at T3. CONCLUSIONS: These findings emphasize the need to assess and monitor the risk factors that can have an adverse impact on postpartum women's psychological health. This finding is particularly important for women deemed to be at risk of problematic body image or weight issues so that health professionals can intervene, and better ensure the health of new mothers in the longer term. SN - 1878-4321 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30139521/The_Associations_of_Weight_Status_and_Body_Attitudes_with_Depressive_and_Anxiety_Symptoms_Across_the_First_Year_Postpartum_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1049-3867(18)30104-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -