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Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm Associated with Vertebral Artery: Biomedical Glue-Coated Teflon Sling Transposition Technique.
World Neurosurg. 2018 Dec; 120:e342-e348.WN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Microvascular decompression is the most effective treatment for hemifacial spasm. However, when encountering hemifacial spasm associated with vertebral artery (VA), the procedure is more challenging and requires complicated operation techniques. The authors retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics of this group of cases and investigated reasonable transposition procedures for different anatomic classifications.

METHODS

We retrospectively analyzed 117 cases that underwent their first microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm between June 2010 and December 2016, which had all associated with vertebral artery compression diagnosed by preoperational radiology examination. The study first classified offending vessels into 3 types according to operative anatomy and designed personalized decompression management according to different forms of neurovascular conflict. Curative effects and complications were assessed.

RESULTS

The offending vessels were artificially divided into 3 types according to both arterial pattern and compression direction: 1) ipsilateral VA plus anterior inferior cerebellar artery compressing the facial nerve from the ventrolateral direction in 72 (61.5%) cases; 2) ipsilateral VA plus posterior inferior cerebellar artery compressing the facial nerve from the caudal-medial direction in 31 (26.5%) cases; 3) bilateral VA compressing the facial nerve in 14 (12.0%) cases. We selected corridors to expose the neurovascular conflict site between the suprafloccular-transhorizontal fissure approach and subtonsillar-transcerebellomedullary fissure approach. The methods of decompression consist of anteromedial and posterolateral transposition by using biomedical glue-coated Teflon sling. Sufficient decompression of the offending vessels was safely performed in all cases. All cases had total relief of symptoms immediately after their operations. Follow-up periods ranged from 16-90 months, and total recovery occurred in 110 cases (94.0%). In 7 cases (6.0%), 90% recovery occurred.

CONCLUSIONS

Accuracy and comprehensive recognition of anatomic features of the offending vessels are crucial for the management of hemifacial spasm associated with vertebral artery compression. Appropriate approaches combined with the biomedical glue-coated Teflon sling transposition technique can allow adequate mobilization of the vertebral artery and bring complete postoperative symptom relief for most cases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurosurgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of USTC, Anhui Provincial Hospital, Hefei, Anhui, China; Division of Life Sciences and Medicine, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, China; Anhui Provincial Stereotactic Neurosurgical Institute, Hefei, Anhui, China; Anhui Provincial Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Brain Disease, Hefei, Anhui, China.Department of Neurosurgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of USTC, Anhui Provincial Hospital, Hefei, Anhui, China; School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, China; Division of Life Sciences and Medicine, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, China; Anhui Provincial Stereotactic Neurosurgical Institute, Hefei, Anhui, China; Anhui Provincial Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Brain Disease, Hefei, Anhui, China.Department of Neurosurgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of USTC, Anhui Provincial Hospital, Hefei, Anhui, China; School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, China; Division of Life Sciences and Medicine, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, China; Anhui Provincial Stereotactic Neurosurgical Institute, Hefei, Anhui, China; Anhui Provincial Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Brain Disease, Hefei, Anhui, China.Department of Neurosurgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of USTC, Anhui Provincial Hospital, Hefei, Anhui, China; School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, China; Division of Life Sciences and Medicine, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, China; Anhui Provincial Stereotactic Neurosurgical Institute, Hefei, Anhui, China; Anhui Provincial Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Brain Disease, Hefei, Anhui, China. Electronic address: niuchaoshi1@126.com.Division of Life Sciences and Medicine, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, China; Anhui Provincial Stereotactic Neurosurgical Institute, Hefei, Anhui, China.Anhui Provincial Stereotactic Neurosurgical Institute, Hefei, Anhui, China; Department of Nursing, The First Affiliated Hospital of USTC, Anhui Provincial Hospital, Hefei, Anhui, China.Department of Neurosurgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of USTC, Anhui Provincial Hospital, Hefei, Anhui, China; Anhui Provincial Stereotactic Neurosurgical Institute, Hefei, Anhui, China; Department of Nursing, The First Affiliated Hospital of USTC, Anhui Provincial Hospital, Hefei, Anhui, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30144608

Citation

Jiang, Xiaofeng, et al. "Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm Associated With Vertebral Artery: Biomedical Glue-Coated Teflon Sling Transposition Technique." World Neurosurgery, vol. 120, 2018, pp. e342-e348.
Jiang X, Wu M, Fu X, et al. Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm Associated with Vertebral Artery: Biomedical Glue-Coated Teflon Sling Transposition Technique. World Neurosurg. 2018;120:e342-e348.
Jiang, X., Wu, M., Fu, X., Niu, C., He, F., Sun, K., & Zhuang, H. (2018). Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm Associated with Vertebral Artery: Biomedical Glue-Coated Teflon Sling Transposition Technique. World Neurosurgery, 120, e342-e348. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2018.08.073
Jiang X, et al. Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm Associated With Vertebral Artery: Biomedical Glue-Coated Teflon Sling Transposition Technique. World Neurosurg. 2018;120:e342-e348. PubMed PMID: 30144608.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm Associated with Vertebral Artery: Biomedical Glue-Coated Teflon Sling Transposition Technique. AU - Jiang,Xiaofeng, AU - Wu,Min, AU - Fu,Xianming, AU - Niu,Chaoshi, AU - He,Fang, AU - Sun,Kegui, AU - Zhuang,Hongxia, Y1 - 2018/08/23/ PY - 2018/07/02/received PY - 2018/08/09/revised PY - 2018/08/11/accepted PY - 2018/8/26/pubmed PY - 2019/1/3/medline PY - 2018/8/26/entrez KW - Abnormal muscle response KW - Biomedical glue sling technique KW - Brainstem auditory evoked potential KW - Hemifacial spasm KW - Microvascular decompression KW - Neurovascular conflict KW - Vertebral artery SP - e342 EP - e348 JF - World neurosurgery JO - World Neurosurg VL - 120 N2 - BACKGROUND: Microvascular decompression is the most effective treatment for hemifacial spasm. However, when encountering hemifacial spasm associated with vertebral artery (VA), the procedure is more challenging and requires complicated operation techniques. The authors retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics of this group of cases and investigated reasonable transposition procedures for different anatomic classifications. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 117 cases that underwent their first microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm between June 2010 and December 2016, which had all associated with vertebral artery compression diagnosed by preoperational radiology examination. The study first classified offending vessels into 3 types according to operative anatomy and designed personalized decompression management according to different forms of neurovascular conflict. Curative effects and complications were assessed. RESULTS: The offending vessels were artificially divided into 3 types according to both arterial pattern and compression direction: 1) ipsilateral VA plus anterior inferior cerebellar artery compressing the facial nerve from the ventrolateral direction in 72 (61.5%) cases; 2) ipsilateral VA plus posterior inferior cerebellar artery compressing the facial nerve from the caudal-medial direction in 31 (26.5%) cases; 3) bilateral VA compressing the facial nerve in 14 (12.0%) cases. We selected corridors to expose the neurovascular conflict site between the suprafloccular-transhorizontal fissure approach and subtonsillar-transcerebellomedullary fissure approach. The methods of decompression consist of anteromedial and posterolateral transposition by using biomedical glue-coated Teflon sling. Sufficient decompression of the offending vessels was safely performed in all cases. All cases had total relief of symptoms immediately after their operations. Follow-up periods ranged from 16-90 months, and total recovery occurred in 110 cases (94.0%). In 7 cases (6.0%), 90% recovery occurred. CONCLUSIONS: Accuracy and comprehensive recognition of anatomic features of the offending vessels are crucial for the management of hemifacial spasm associated with vertebral artery compression. Appropriate approaches combined with the biomedical glue-coated Teflon sling transposition technique can allow adequate mobilization of the vertebral artery and bring complete postoperative symptom relief for most cases. SN - 1878-8769 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30144608/Microvascular_Decompression_for_Hemifacial_Spasm_Associated_with_Vertebral_Artery:_Biomedical_Glue_Coated_Teflon_Sling_Transposition_Technique_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -