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Protective effects of curcumin on acrolein-induced neurotoxicity in HT22 mouse hippocampal cells.
Pharmacol Rep. 2018 Oct; 70(5):1040-1046.PR

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Aging is one of the most important inevitable risk factors of Alzheimer disease (AD). Oxidative stress plays a critical role in the process of aging. Curcumin has been proposed to improve neural damage, especially neurodegenerative injury, through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, we investigated the effects of curcumin on acrolein-induced AD-like pathologies in HT22 cells.

METHODS

HT22 murine hippocampal neuronal cells were treated with 25μM acrolein for 24h with or without pre-treating with curcumin at the selected optimum concentration (5μg/mL) for 30min. Cell viability and apoptosis were measured by CCK8 assay and flow cytometric analysis. Levels of glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were detected by a GSH assay kit or commercial assay kits, respectively. Alterations in the expression of BDNF/TrkB and key enzymes involved in amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolism were assessed by western blotting.

RESULTS

Data showed that curcumin significantly reversed acrolein-induced oxidative stress indicated by depletion of GSH and SOD, and elevation of MDA. The findings also suggested curcumin's potential in protecting HT22 cells against acrolein through regulating the BDNF/TrkB signaling. In addition, acrolein-induced reduction in A-disintegrin and metalloprotease, and the increase of amyloid precursor protein, β-secretase, and receptor for advanced glycation end products were reversed either, and most of them were nearly restored to the control levels by curcumin.

CONCLUSION

These findings demonstrate the protective effects of curcumin on acrolein-induced neurotoxicity in vitro, which further suggests its potential role in the treatment of AD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China.Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China; Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, The Seventh Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Shenzhen, China.Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, The Seventh Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Shenzhen, China.Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, The Seventh Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Shenzhen, China.Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, The Seventh Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Shenzhen, China.Department of Neurology, The First Clinical Medical College of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: 740466982@qq.com.Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China; Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, The Seventh Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Shenzhen, China. Electronic address: himbox@yeah.net.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30144665

Citation

Shi, Lan-Ying, et al. "Protective Effects of Curcumin On Acrolein-induced Neurotoxicity in HT22 Mouse Hippocampal Cells." Pharmacological Reports : PR, vol. 70, no. 5, 2018, pp. 1040-1046.
Shi LY, Zhang L, Li H, et al. Protective effects of curcumin on acrolein-induced neurotoxicity in HT22 mouse hippocampal cells. Pharmacol Rep. 2018;70(5):1040-1046.
Shi, L. Y., Zhang, L., Li, H., Liu, T. L., Lai, J. C., Wu, Z. B., & Qin, J. (2018). Protective effects of curcumin on acrolein-induced neurotoxicity in HT22 mouse hippocampal cells. Pharmacological Reports : PR, 70(5), 1040-1046. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pharep.2018.05.006
Shi LY, et al. Protective Effects of Curcumin On Acrolein-induced Neurotoxicity in HT22 Mouse Hippocampal Cells. Pharmacol Rep. 2018;70(5):1040-1046. PubMed PMID: 30144665.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Protective effects of curcumin on acrolein-induced neurotoxicity in HT22 mouse hippocampal cells. AU - Shi,Lan-Ying, AU - Zhang,Li, AU - Li,Hui, AU - Liu,Tao-Li, AU - Lai,Ji-Cai, AU - Wu,Zhi-Bing, AU - Qin,Jian, Y1 - 2018/05/17/ PY - 2017/10/10/received PY - 2018/03/07/revised PY - 2018/05/16/accepted PY - 2018/8/26/pubmed PY - 2018/11/18/medline PY - 2018/8/26/entrez KW - Acrolein KW - Alzheimer disease KW - BNDF/TrkB KW - Curcumin SP - 1040 EP - 1046 JF - Pharmacological reports : PR JO - Pharmacol Rep VL - 70 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Aging is one of the most important inevitable risk factors of Alzheimer disease (AD). Oxidative stress plays a critical role in the process of aging. Curcumin has been proposed to improve neural damage, especially neurodegenerative injury, through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, we investigated the effects of curcumin on acrolein-induced AD-like pathologies in HT22 cells. METHODS: HT22 murine hippocampal neuronal cells were treated with 25μM acrolein for 24h with or without pre-treating with curcumin at the selected optimum concentration (5μg/mL) for 30min. Cell viability and apoptosis were measured by CCK8 assay and flow cytometric analysis. Levels of glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were detected by a GSH assay kit or commercial assay kits, respectively. Alterations in the expression of BDNF/TrkB and key enzymes involved in amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolism were assessed by western blotting. RESULTS: Data showed that curcumin significantly reversed acrolein-induced oxidative stress indicated by depletion of GSH and SOD, and elevation of MDA. The findings also suggested curcumin's potential in protecting HT22 cells against acrolein through regulating the BDNF/TrkB signaling. In addition, acrolein-induced reduction in A-disintegrin and metalloprotease, and the increase of amyloid precursor protein, β-secretase, and receptor for advanced glycation end products were reversed either, and most of them were nearly restored to the control levels by curcumin. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate the protective effects of curcumin on acrolein-induced neurotoxicity in vitro, which further suggests its potential role in the treatment of AD. SN - 1734-1140 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30144665/Protective_effects_of_curcumin_on_acrolein_induced_neurotoxicity_in_HT22_mouse_hippocampal_cells_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1734-1140(17)30680-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -