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Effects of dietary Clostridium butyricum supplementation on growth performance, intestinal development, and immune response of weaned piglets challenged with lipopolysaccharide.
J Anim Sci Biotechnol. 2018; 9:62.JA

Abstract

Background

Weanling pigs, with immature immune system and physiological function, usually experience post-weaning diarrhea. This study determined the effects of dietary Clostridium butyricum supplementation on growth performance, diarrhea, and immunity of weaned pigs challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

Methods

In Experiment (Exp.) 1, 144 weaned piglets were weaned at 21 d and randomly assigned to six groups, with six replicates per group and four pigs per replicate, receiving a control diet (CON) or diet supplemented with antibiotics (AB) or C. butyricum (CB) (0.1%, 0.2%, 0.4%, or 0.8%), respectively. All diets in Exp. 1 were a highly digestible basal diet, with 3,000 mg/kg zinc oxide supplied in the first 2 wk only. In Exp. 2, 180 piglets were weaned at 21 d and randomly assigned to five groups, with six replicates per group and six pigs per replicate, receiving CON, AB, or CB (0.2%, 0.4%, or 0.6%) diets. The digestibility of diets was lower than those in Exp. 1, and did not include zinc oxide. At 36 d of Exp. 2, 12 piglets were selected from each of the CON and 0.4% CB groups, six piglets were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (50 μg/kg body weight) and the other six piglets with normal saline; animals were killed at 4 h after injection to collect blood, intestine, and digesta samples for biochemical analysis.

Results

In Exp. 1, CB and AB diets had no effect on growth performance of piglets. In Exp. 2, 0.4% CB decreased feed-gain ratio (P < 0.1), diarrhea score (P < 0.05), and increased duodenal, jejunal, and ileal villus height and jejunal villus height/crypt depth (P < 0.05). The 0.4% CB decreased the plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α (P < 0.05) but increased ileal mucosa IL-10 and TLR2 mRNA expression (P < 0.05). Furthermore, 0.4% CB altered the microbial profile, with Bacillus and Ruminococcaceae UGG-003 at genus level and Lactobacillus casei and Parasutterella secunda at species level were higher than CON in colonic content (P < 0.05).

Conclusions

Dietary C. butyricum supplementation had positive effects on growth of weaned piglets with less digestible diets. There was a tendency to reduce the feed-gain ratio, which could reduce feed costs in pig production. Moreover, C. butyricum decreased post-weaning diarrhea by improving the intestinal morphology, intestinal microflora profile, and immune function.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition, Ministry of Education, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China. 2Institute of Animal Nutrition, Sichuan Agricultural University, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China.1Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition, Ministry of Education, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China. 2Institute of Animal Nutrition, Sichuan Agricultural University, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China.1Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition, Ministry of Education, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China. 2Institute of Animal Nutrition, Sichuan Agricultural University, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China.1Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition, Ministry of Education, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China. 2Institute of Animal Nutrition, Sichuan Agricultural University, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China.1Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition, Ministry of Education, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China. 2Institute of Animal Nutrition, Sichuan Agricultural University, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China.1Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition, Ministry of Education, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China. 2Institute of Animal Nutrition, Sichuan Agricultural University, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China.1Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition, Ministry of Education, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China. 2Institute of Animal Nutrition, Sichuan Agricultural University, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China.1Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition, Ministry of Education, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China. 2Institute of Animal Nutrition, Sichuan Agricultural University, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China.1Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition, Ministry of Education, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China. 2Institute of Animal Nutrition, Sichuan Agricultural University, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China.1Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition, Ministry of Education, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China. 2Institute of Animal Nutrition, Sichuan Agricultural University, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China.1Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition, Ministry of Education, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China. 2Institute of Animal Nutrition, Sichuan Agricultural University, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China.1Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition, Ministry of Education, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China. 2Institute of Animal Nutrition, Sichuan Agricultural University, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China.1Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition, Ministry of Education, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China. 2Institute of Animal Nutrition, Sichuan Agricultural University, No. 211, Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130 People's Republic of China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30159141

Citation

Chen, Ling, et al. "Effects of Dietary Clostridium Butyricum Supplementation On Growth Performance, Intestinal Development, and Immune Response of Weaned Piglets Challenged With Lipopolysaccharide." Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, vol. 9, 2018, p. 62.
Chen L, Li S, Zheng J, et al. Effects of dietary Clostridium butyricum supplementation on growth performance, intestinal development, and immune response of weaned piglets challenged with lipopolysaccharide. Journal of animal science and biotechnology. 2018;9:62.
Chen, L., Li, S., Zheng, J., Li, W., Jiang, X., Zhao, X., Li, J., Che, L., Lin, Y., Xu, S., Feng, B., Fang, Z., & De Wu, . (2018). Effects of dietary Clostridium butyricum supplementation on growth performance, intestinal development, and immune response of weaned piglets challenged with lipopolysaccharide. Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, 9, 62. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40104-018-0275-8
Chen L, et al. Effects of Dietary Clostridium Butyricum Supplementation On Growth Performance, Intestinal Development, and Immune Response of Weaned Piglets Challenged With Lipopolysaccharide. Journal of animal science and biotechnology. 2018;9:62. PubMed PMID: 30159141.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of dietary Clostridium butyricum supplementation on growth performance, intestinal development, and immune response of weaned piglets challenged with lipopolysaccharide. AU - Chen,Ling, AU - Li,Shuang, AU - Zheng,Jie, AU - Li,Wentao, AU - Jiang,Xuemei, AU - Zhao,Xilun, AU - Li,Jian, AU - Che,Lianqiang, AU - Lin,Yan, AU - Xu,Shengyu, AU - Feng,Bin, AU - Fang,Zhengfeng, AU - De Wu,, Y1 - 2018/08/23/ PY - 2018/02/05/received PY - 2018/06/19/accepted PY - 2018/8/31/entrez PY - 2018/8/31/pubmed PY - 2018/8/31/medline KW - Clostridium butyricum KW - Growth performance KW - Immune KW - Intestinal microflora KW - Weaned piglets SP - 62 EP - 62 JF - Journal of animal science and biotechnology VL - 9 N2 - Background: Weanling pigs, with immature immune system and physiological function, usually experience post-weaning diarrhea. This study determined the effects of dietary Clostridium butyricum supplementation on growth performance, diarrhea, and immunity of weaned pigs challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Methods: In Experiment (Exp.) 1, 144 weaned piglets were weaned at 21 d and randomly assigned to six groups, with six replicates per group and four pigs per replicate, receiving a control diet (CON) or diet supplemented with antibiotics (AB) or C. butyricum (CB) (0.1%, 0.2%, 0.4%, or 0.8%), respectively. All diets in Exp. 1 were a highly digestible basal diet, with 3,000 mg/kg zinc oxide supplied in the first 2 wk only. In Exp. 2, 180 piglets were weaned at 21 d and randomly assigned to five groups, with six replicates per group and six pigs per replicate, receiving CON, AB, or CB (0.2%, 0.4%, or 0.6%) diets. The digestibility of diets was lower than those in Exp. 1, and did not include zinc oxide. At 36 d of Exp. 2, 12 piglets were selected from each of the CON and 0.4% CB groups, six piglets were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (50 μg/kg body weight) and the other six piglets with normal saline; animals were killed at 4 h after injection to collect blood, intestine, and digesta samples for biochemical analysis. Results: In Exp. 1, CB and AB diets had no effect on growth performance of piglets. In Exp. 2, 0.4% CB decreased feed-gain ratio (P < 0.1), diarrhea score (P < 0.05), and increased duodenal, jejunal, and ileal villus height and jejunal villus height/crypt depth (P < 0.05). The 0.4% CB decreased the plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α (P < 0.05) but increased ileal mucosa IL-10 and TLR2 mRNA expression (P < 0.05). Furthermore, 0.4% CB altered the microbial profile, with Bacillus and Ruminococcaceae UGG-003 at genus level and Lactobacillus casei and Parasutterella secunda at species level were higher than CON in colonic content (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Dietary C. butyricum supplementation had positive effects on growth of weaned piglets with less digestible diets. There was a tendency to reduce the feed-gain ratio, which could reduce feed costs in pig production. Moreover, C. butyricum decreased post-weaning diarrhea by improving the intestinal morphology, intestinal microflora profile, and immune function. SN - 1674-9782 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30159141/Effects_of_dietary_Clostridium_butyricum_supplementation_on_growth_performance_intestinal_development_and_immune_response_of_weaned_piglets_challenged_with_lipopolysaccharide_ L2 - https://jasbsci.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40104-018-0275-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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