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Effects of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol on glucagon receptor coupling to adenylate cyclase in rat liver plasma membranes.
Biochem Pharmacol. 1986 Aug 15; 35(16):2797-803.BP

Abstract

Delta-Tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC), the principal psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa, was found to increase glucagon activation of liver plasma membrane adenylate cyclase. In the presence of 30 microM delta 9-THC, the EC50 for glucagon was decreased by 60% from 7.6nM to 3.1 nM. 11-OH-delta 9-THC, a psychoactive metabolite of delta 9-THC, also increased glucagon activation of adenylate cyclase while two cannabinoids without marihuana-like psychoactive potency, cannabinol and cannabidiol, did not. At 30 microM, delta 9-THC either slightly decreased or had no effect on the activation of adenylate cyclase by GTP, Gpp(NH)p, fluoride ion, forskolin or ATP alone. Delta 9-THC had no effect on the binding of [125I] glucagon to liver plasma membranes. Arrhenius plots demonstrated that delta 9-THC and 11-OH-delta 9-THC, but not CBD, decreased the activation energy above the break temperature. Therefore, delta 9-THC increased the coupling of the glucagon receptor to adenylate cyclase apparently by removing a constraint on receptor-Ns coupling.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3017362

Citation

Hillard, C J., et al. "Effects of Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol On Glucagon Receptor Coupling to Adenylate Cyclase in Rat Liver Plasma Membranes." Biochemical Pharmacology, vol. 35, no. 16, 1986, pp. 2797-803.
Hillard CJ, Bloom AS, Houslay MD. Effects of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol on glucagon receptor coupling to adenylate cyclase in rat liver plasma membranes. Biochem Pharmacol. 1986;35(16):2797-803.
Hillard, C. J., Bloom, A. S., & Houslay, M. D. (1986). Effects of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol on glucagon receptor coupling to adenylate cyclase in rat liver plasma membranes. Biochemical Pharmacology, 35(16), 2797-803.
Hillard CJ, Bloom AS, Houslay MD. Effects of Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol On Glucagon Receptor Coupling to Adenylate Cyclase in Rat Liver Plasma Membranes. Biochem Pharmacol. 1986 Aug 15;35(16):2797-803. PubMed PMID: 3017362.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol on glucagon receptor coupling to adenylate cyclase in rat liver plasma membranes. AU - Hillard,C J, AU - Bloom,A S, AU - Houslay,M D, PY - 1986/8/15/pubmed PY - 1986/8/15/medline PY - 1986/8/15/entrez SP - 2797 EP - 803 JF - Biochemical pharmacology JO - Biochem Pharmacol VL - 35 IS - 16 N2 - Delta-Tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC), the principal psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa, was found to increase glucagon activation of liver plasma membrane adenylate cyclase. In the presence of 30 microM delta 9-THC, the EC50 for glucagon was decreased by 60% from 7.6nM to 3.1 nM. 11-OH-delta 9-THC, a psychoactive metabolite of delta 9-THC, also increased glucagon activation of adenylate cyclase while two cannabinoids without marihuana-like psychoactive potency, cannabinol and cannabidiol, did not. At 30 microM, delta 9-THC either slightly decreased or had no effect on the activation of adenylate cyclase by GTP, Gpp(NH)p, fluoride ion, forskolin or ATP alone. Delta 9-THC had no effect on the binding of [125I] glucagon to liver plasma membranes. Arrhenius plots demonstrated that delta 9-THC and 11-OH-delta 9-THC, but not CBD, decreased the activation energy above the break temperature. Therefore, delta 9-THC increased the coupling of the glucagon receptor to adenylate cyclase apparently by removing a constraint on receptor-Ns coupling. SN - 0006-2952 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3017362/Effects_of_delta_9_tetrahydrocannabinol_on_glucagon_receptor_coupling_to_adenylate_cyclase_in_rat_liver_plasma_membranes_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0006-2952(86)90192-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -