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Intergenerational transmission of adverse childhood experiences via maternal depression and anxiety and moderation by child sex.
J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2019 02; 10(1):88-99.JD

Abstract

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) of parents are associated with a variety of negative health outcomes in offspring. Little is known about the mechanisms by which ACEs are transmitted to the next generation. Given that maternal depression and anxiety are related to ACEs and negatively affect children's behaviour, these exposures may be pathways between maternal ACEs and child psychopathology. Child sex may modify these associations. Our objectives were to determine: (1) the association between ACEs and children's behaviour, (2) whether maternal symptoms of prenatal and postnatal depression and anxiety mediate the relationship between maternal ACEs and children's behaviour, and (3) whether these relationships are moderated by child sex. Pearson correlations and latent path analyses were undertaken using data from 907 children and their mothers enrolled the Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition study. Overall, maternal ACEs were associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression during the perinatal period, and externalizing problems in children. Furthermore, we observed indirect associations between maternal ACEs and children's internalizing and externalizing problems via maternal anxiety and depression. Sex differences were observed, with boys demonstrating greater vulnerability to the indirect effects of maternal ACEs via both anxiety and depression. Findings suggest that maternal mental health may be a mechanism by which maternal early life adversity is transmitted to children, especially boys. Further research is needed to determine if targeted interventions with women who have both high ACEs and mental health problems can prevent or ameliorate the effects of ACEs on children's behavioural psychopathology.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics,University of Calgary,Child Development Center,Calgary,AB,Canada.Department of Pediatrics,University of Calgary,Child Development Center,Calgary,AB,Canada.Department of Pediatrics,University of Calgary,Child Development Center,Calgary,AB,Canada.Department of Pediatrics,University of Calgary,Child Development Center,Calgary,AB,Canada.Department of Pediatrics,University of Calgary,Child Development Center,Calgary,AB,Canada.Department of Pediatrics,University of Calgary,Child Development Center,Calgary,AB,Canada.Department of Pediatrics,University of Calgary,Child Development Center,Calgary,AB,Canada.Department of Pediatrics,University of Calgary,Child Development Center,Calgary,AB,Canada.Department of Pediatrics,University of Calgary,Child Development Center,Calgary,AB,Canada.Department of Pediatrics,University of Calgary,Child Development Center,Calgary,AB,Canada.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30175696

Citation

Letourneau, N, et al. "Intergenerational Transmission of Adverse Childhood Experiences Via Maternal Depression and Anxiety and Moderation By Child Sex." Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, vol. 10, no. 1, 2019, pp. 88-99.
Letourneau N, Dewey D, Kaplan BJ, et al. Intergenerational transmission of adverse childhood experiences via maternal depression and anxiety and moderation by child sex. J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2019;10(1):88-99.
Letourneau, N., Dewey, D., Kaplan, B. J., Ntanda, H., Novick, J., Thomas, J. C., Deane, A. J., Leung, B., Pon, K., & Giesbrecht, G. F. (2019). Intergenerational transmission of adverse childhood experiences via maternal depression and anxiety and moderation by child sex. Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, 10(1), 88-99. https://doi.org/10.1017/S2040174418000648
Letourneau N, et al. Intergenerational Transmission of Adverse Childhood Experiences Via Maternal Depression and Anxiety and Moderation By Child Sex. J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2019;10(1):88-99. PubMed PMID: 30175696.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intergenerational transmission of adverse childhood experiences via maternal depression and anxiety and moderation by child sex. AU - Letourneau,N, AU - Dewey,D, AU - Kaplan,B J, AU - Ntanda,H, AU - Novick,J, AU - Thomas,J C, AU - Deane,A J, AU - Leung,B, AU - Pon,K, AU - Giesbrecht,G F, AU - ,, Y1 - 2018/09/03/ PY - 2018/9/4/pubmed PY - 2020/3/24/medline PY - 2018/9/4/entrez KW - adverse KW - child behaviour KW - internalizing and externalizing behaviour KW - maternal anxiety KW - maternal depression SP - 88 EP - 99 JF - Journal of developmental origins of health and disease JO - J Dev Orig Health Dis VL - 10 IS - 1 N2 - Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) of parents are associated with a variety of negative health outcomes in offspring. Little is known about the mechanisms by which ACEs are transmitted to the next generation. Given that maternal depression and anxiety are related to ACEs and negatively affect children's behaviour, these exposures may be pathways between maternal ACEs and child psychopathology. Child sex may modify these associations. Our objectives were to determine: (1) the association between ACEs and children's behaviour, (2) whether maternal symptoms of prenatal and postnatal depression and anxiety mediate the relationship between maternal ACEs and children's behaviour, and (3) whether these relationships are moderated by child sex. Pearson correlations and latent path analyses were undertaken using data from 907 children and their mothers enrolled the Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition study. Overall, maternal ACEs were associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression during the perinatal period, and externalizing problems in children. Furthermore, we observed indirect associations between maternal ACEs and children's internalizing and externalizing problems via maternal anxiety and depression. Sex differences were observed, with boys demonstrating greater vulnerability to the indirect effects of maternal ACEs via both anxiety and depression. Findings suggest that maternal mental health may be a mechanism by which maternal early life adversity is transmitted to children, especially boys. Further research is needed to determine if targeted interventions with women who have both high ACEs and mental health problems can prevent or ameliorate the effects of ACEs on children's behavioural psychopathology. SN - 2040-1752 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30175696/Intergenerational_transmission_of_adverse_childhood_experiences_via_maternal_depression_and_anxiety_and_moderation_by_child_sex_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S2040174418000648/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -