Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Individual and combined effects of acute delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol on psychotomimetic symptoms and memory function.
Transl Psychiatry 2018; 8(1):181TP

Abstract

The main active ingredient in cannabis, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), can acutely induce psychotic symptoms and impair episodic and working memory. Another major constituent, cannabidiol (CBD), may attenuate these effects. This study aimed to determine the effects of THC and CBD, both alone and in combination on psychotic symptoms and memory function. A randomised, double-blind crossover design compared the effects of (i) placebo, (ii) THC 8 mg, (iii) CBD 16 mg and (iv) THC 8 mg + CBD 16 mg administered by inhalation through a vaporiser. Using an experimental medicine approach to predict treatment sensitivity, we selected 48 cannabis users from the community on the basis of (1) schizotypal personality questionnaire scores (low, high) and (2) frequency of cannabis use (light, heavy). The Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), Psychotomimetic States Inventory (PSI), immediate and delayed prose recall (episodic memory), 1- and 2-back (working memory) were assessed on each day. Results indicated that THC increased overall scores on the PSI, negative symptoms on BPRS, and robustly impaired episodic and working memory. Co-administration of CBD did not attenuate these effects. CBD alone reduced PSI scores in light users only. At a ratio of 2:1, CBD does not attenuate the acute psychotic and memory impairing effects of vaporised THC. Frequent cannabis users may show a blunted anti- psychotic response to CBD, which is of concern due to the high rates of cannabis use disorders in patients with schizophrenia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Psychopharmacology and Addiction Research Centre, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK. celia.morgan@exeter.ac.uk. Clinical Psychopharmacology Unit, University College London, London, UK. celia.morgan@exeter.ac.uk.Clinical Psychopharmacology Unit, University College London, London, UK.Clinical Psychopharmacology Unit, University College London, London, UK.Clinical Psychopharmacology Unit, University College London, London, UK.Clinical Psychopharmacology Unit, University College London, London, UK.Clinical Psychopharmacology Unit, University College London, London, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30185793

Citation

Morgan, Celia J A., et al. "Individual and Combined Effects of Acute Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and Cannabidiol On Psychotomimetic Symptoms and Memory Function." Translational Psychiatry, vol. 8, no. 1, 2018, p. 181.
Morgan CJA, Freeman TP, Hindocha C, et al. Individual and combined effects of acute delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol on psychotomimetic symptoms and memory function. Transl Psychiatry. 2018;8(1):181.
Morgan, C. J. A., Freeman, T. P., Hindocha, C., Schafer, G., Gardner, C., & Curran, H. V. (2018). Individual and combined effects of acute delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol on psychotomimetic symptoms and memory function. Translational Psychiatry, 8(1), p. 181. doi:10.1038/s41398-018-0191-x.
Morgan CJA, et al. Individual and Combined Effects of Acute Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and Cannabidiol On Psychotomimetic Symptoms and Memory Function. Transl Psychiatry. 2018 09 5;8(1):181. PubMed PMID: 30185793.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Individual and combined effects of acute delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol on psychotomimetic symptoms and memory function. AU - Morgan,Celia J A, AU - Freeman,Tom P, AU - Hindocha,Chandni, AU - Schafer,Grainne, AU - Gardner,Chelsea, AU - Curran,H Valerie, Y1 - 2018/09/05/ PY - 2017/09/20/received PY - 2018/06/05/accepted PY - 2018/05/18/revised PY - 2018/9/7/entrez PY - 2018/9/7/pubmed PY - 2019/3/15/medline SP - 181 EP - 181 JF - Translational psychiatry JO - Transl Psychiatry VL - 8 IS - 1 N2 - The main active ingredient in cannabis, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), can acutely induce psychotic symptoms and impair episodic and working memory. Another major constituent, cannabidiol (CBD), may attenuate these effects. This study aimed to determine the effects of THC and CBD, both alone and in combination on psychotic symptoms and memory function. A randomised, double-blind crossover design compared the effects of (i) placebo, (ii) THC 8 mg, (iii) CBD 16 mg and (iv) THC 8 mg + CBD 16 mg administered by inhalation through a vaporiser. Using an experimental medicine approach to predict treatment sensitivity, we selected 48 cannabis users from the community on the basis of (1) schizotypal personality questionnaire scores (low, high) and (2) frequency of cannabis use (light, heavy). The Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), Psychotomimetic States Inventory (PSI), immediate and delayed prose recall (episodic memory), 1- and 2-back (working memory) were assessed on each day. Results indicated that THC increased overall scores on the PSI, negative symptoms on BPRS, and robustly impaired episodic and working memory. Co-administration of CBD did not attenuate these effects. CBD alone reduced PSI scores in light users only. At a ratio of 2:1, CBD does not attenuate the acute psychotic and memory impairing effects of vaporised THC. Frequent cannabis users may show a blunted anti- psychotic response to CBD, which is of concern due to the high rates of cannabis use disorders in patients with schizophrenia. SN - 2158-3188 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30185793/Individual_and_combined_effects_of_acute_delta_9_tetrahydrocannabinol_and_cannabidiol_on_psychotomimetic_symptoms_and_memory_function_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41398-018-0191-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -