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IgG subclass responses to excreted-secreted antigens of Plasmodium falciparum in a low-transmission malaria area of the Peruvian Amazon.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Malaria in Peru is concentrated in the Amazon region, especially in Loreto, and transmission is focused in rural and peri-urban communities. The government has approved a malaria elimination plan with a community approach and seeks to reduce the risk of transmission through preventive interventions, but asymptomatic and low-parasite-density infections are challenges for disease control and elimination. IgG antibodies play a critical role in combating infection through their ability to reduce parasitaemia and clinical symptoms. In particular, IgG subclasses have important roles in controlling malaria disease and may provide new insight into the development of malaria control strategies and understanding of malaria transmission. Through the use of excreted-secreted antigens from Plasmodium falciparum, were evaluated the responses of the four IgG subclasses in symptomatic and asymptomatic malarial infections.

RESULTS

Higher levels of whole IgG were observed in asymptomatic carriers (P < 0.05). IgG3 and IgG1 were the most prevalent subclasses and did not show differences in their antibody levels in either type of carrier. All symptomatic carriers were positive for IgG4, and the presence of IgG3 and IgG2 were correlated with protection against parasitaemia. IgG2 showed lower prevalence and antibody titers in comparison to other subclasses.

CONCLUSIONS

This is the first study that characterizes the IgG subclass response in the Peruvian Amazon, and these results show that even in populations from regions with low malaria transmission, a certain degree of naturally acquired immunity can develop when the right antibody subclasses are produced. This provides important insight into the potential mechanisms regulating protective immunity.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Fundación para el Desarrollo Sostenible de la Amazonía Baja del Perú, Universidad Nacional de la Amazonía Peruana, Iquitos, Perú. Laboratorio de Investigación de Productos Naturales Antiparasitarios de la Amazonía Peruana, Centro de Investigación de Recursos Naturales de la Amazonía, Universidad Nacional de la Amazonía Peruana, Iquitos, Perú.

    ,

    Laboratorio de Investigación de Productos Naturales Antiparasitarios de la Amazonía Peruana, Centro de Investigación de Recursos Naturales de la Amazonía, Universidad Nacional de la Amazonía Peruana, Iquitos, Perú.

    ,

    Fundación para el Desarrollo Sostenible de la Amazonía Baja del Perú, Universidad Nacional de la Amazonía Peruana, Iquitos, Perú.

    ,

    Centro de Investigación en Enfermedades Tropicales "Maxime Kuczynski", Instituto Nacional de Salud, Lima, Perú.

    ,

    Fundación para el Desarrollo Sostenible de la Amazonía Baja del Perú, Universidad Nacional de la Amazonía Peruana, Iquitos, Perú. Laboratorio de Investigación de Productos Naturales Antiparasitarios de la Amazonía Peruana, Centro de Investigación de Recursos Naturales de la Amazonía, Universidad Nacional de la Amazonía Peruana, Iquitos, Perú.

    ,

    Facultad de Medicina Humana, Universidad Nacional de la Amazonía Peruana, Iquitos, Perú.

    Fundación para el Desarrollo Sostenible de la Amazonía Baja del Perú, Universidad Nacional de la Amazonía Peruana, Iquitos, Perú. vivi_vane@hotmail.com. Laboratorio de Investigación de Productos Naturales Antiparasitarios de la Amazonía Peruana, Centro de Investigación de Recursos Naturales de la Amazonía, Universidad Nacional de la Amazonía Peruana, Iquitos, Perú. vivi_vane@hotmail.com.

    Source

    Malaria journal 17:1 2018 Sep 11 pg 328

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Antibodies, Protozoan
    Asymptomatic Infections
    Female
    Humans
    Immunoglobulin G
    Malaria, Falciparum
    Male
    Peru
    Plasmodium falciparum
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    30200987

    Citation

    Saavedra-Langer, Rafael, et al. "IgG Subclass Responses to Excreted-secreted Antigens of Plasmodium Falciparum in a Low-transmission Malaria Area of the Peruvian Amazon." Malaria Journal, vol. 17, no. 1, 2018, p. 328.
    Saavedra-Langer R, Marapara J, Valle-Campos A, et al. IgG subclass responses to excreted-secreted antigens of Plasmodium falciparum in a low-transmission malaria area of the Peruvian Amazon. Malar J. 2018;17(1):328.
    Saavedra-Langer, R., Marapara, J., Valle-Campos, A., Durand, S., Vásquez-Chasnamote, M. E., Silva, H., & Pinedo-Cancino, V. (2018). IgG subclass responses to excreted-secreted antigens of Plasmodium falciparum in a low-transmission malaria area of the Peruvian Amazon. Malaria Journal, 17(1), p. 328. doi:10.1186/s12936-018-2471-6.
    Saavedra-Langer R, et al. IgG Subclass Responses to Excreted-secreted Antigens of Plasmodium Falciparum in a Low-transmission Malaria Area of the Peruvian Amazon. Malar J. 2018 Sep 11;17(1):328. PubMed PMID: 30200987.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - IgG subclass responses to excreted-secreted antigens of Plasmodium falciparum in a low-transmission malaria area of the Peruvian Amazon. AU - Saavedra-Langer,Rafael, AU - Marapara,Jorge, AU - Valle-Campos,Andree, AU - Durand,Salomón, AU - Vásquez-Chasnamote,Maria E, AU - Silva,Hermann, AU - Pinedo-Cancino,Viviana, Y1 - 2018/09/11/ PY - 2018/04/03/received PY - 2018/08/30/accepted PY - 2018/9/12/entrez PY - 2018/9/12/pubmed PY - 2018/11/14/medline KW - Antibodies KW - Asymptomatic KW - ELISA KW - Exoantigens KW - Zungarococha SP - 328 EP - 328 JF - Malaria journal JO - Malar. J. VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Malaria in Peru is concentrated in the Amazon region, especially in Loreto, and transmission is focused in rural and peri-urban communities. The government has approved a malaria elimination plan with a community approach and seeks to reduce the risk of transmission through preventive interventions, but asymptomatic and low-parasite-density infections are challenges for disease control and elimination. IgG antibodies play a critical role in combating infection through their ability to reduce parasitaemia and clinical symptoms. In particular, IgG subclasses have important roles in controlling malaria disease and may provide new insight into the development of malaria control strategies and understanding of malaria transmission. Through the use of excreted-secreted antigens from Plasmodium falciparum, were evaluated the responses of the four IgG subclasses in symptomatic and asymptomatic malarial infections. RESULTS: Higher levels of whole IgG were observed in asymptomatic carriers (P < 0.05). IgG3 and IgG1 were the most prevalent subclasses and did not show differences in their antibody levels in either type of carrier. All symptomatic carriers were positive for IgG4, and the presence of IgG3 and IgG2 were correlated with protection against parasitaemia. IgG2 showed lower prevalence and antibody titers in comparison to other subclasses. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study that characterizes the IgG subclass response in the Peruvian Amazon, and these results show that even in populations from regions with low malaria transmission, a certain degree of naturally acquired immunity can develop when the right antibody subclasses are produced. This provides important insight into the potential mechanisms regulating protective immunity. SN - 1475-2875 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30200987/IgG_subclass_responses_to_excreted-secreted_antigens_of_Plasmodium_falciparum_in_a_low-transmission_malaria_area_of_the_Peruvian_Amazon L2 - https://malariajournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12936-018-2471-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -