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Granulomas of the membranous vocal fold after intubation and other airway instrumentation.
Laryngoscope. 2019 02; 129(2):441-447.L

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS

We describe the clinical features of granulomas of the membranous vocal fold secondary to endotracheal intubation, bronchoscopy or esophagogastroduodenoscopy.

STUDY DESIGN

Retrospective case series.

METHODS

Review of cases at a single tertiary institution with evaluation of patient demographic characteristics, time to presentation, time to treatment, and clinical outcomes.

RESULTS

Thirteen adult patients were identified with postintervention granuloma of the membranous vocal fold. All patients were female, with a mean age of 60 years (range, 28-81 years). None noted hoarseness prior to the intervention, and all noted significant hoarseness postoperatively. Conservative treatment with proton pump inhibitors and vocal rest was initially implemented in all patients. Four cases resolved without further intervention. Nine underwent surgical management because of airway symptoms, failure to improve, or patient request. One patient had injury to the contralateral vocal fold upon intubation. None experienced recurrence. Five had complete recovery of voice postoperatively, four did not.

CONCLUSION

Iatrogenic granulomas of the membranous vocal fold after intubation or other upper airway instrumentation are rare complications presenting in the early postprocedure period with worsening hoarseness. Initial conservative treatment may be sufficient to yield resolution, and surgical treatment is effective for those failing medical management. Permanent voice damage may result from the original injury.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE

4 Laryngoscope, 129:441-447, 2019.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sean Parker Institute for the Voice, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College/New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York, U.S.A.Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York, U.S.A.Sean Parker Institute for the Voice, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College/New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York, U.S.A.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30208219

Citation

Sadoughi, Babak, et al. "Granulomas of the Membranous Vocal Fold After Intubation and Other Airway Instrumentation." The Laryngoscope, vol. 129, no. 2, 2019, pp. 441-447.
Sadoughi B, Rickert SM, Sulica L. Granulomas of the membranous vocal fold after intubation and other airway instrumentation. Laryngoscope. 2019;129(2):441-447.
Sadoughi, B., Rickert, S. M., & Sulica, L. (2019). Granulomas of the membranous vocal fold after intubation and other airway instrumentation. The Laryngoscope, 129(2), 441-447. https://doi.org/10.1002/lary.27492
Sadoughi B, Rickert SM, Sulica L. Granulomas of the Membranous Vocal Fold After Intubation and Other Airway Instrumentation. Laryngoscope. 2019;129(2):441-447. PubMed PMID: 30208219.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Granulomas of the membranous vocal fold after intubation and other airway instrumentation. AU - Sadoughi,Babak, AU - Rickert,Scott M, AU - Sulica,Lucian, Y1 - 2018/09/12/ PY - 2018/07/13/accepted PY - 2018/9/13/pubmed PY - 2019/5/24/medline PY - 2018/9/13/entrez KW - Laryngeal granuloma KW - intubation injury KW - laryngeal granulation KW - vocal fold injury KW - vocal fold scar SP - 441 EP - 447 JF - The Laryngoscope JO - Laryngoscope VL - 129 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: We describe the clinical features of granulomas of the membranous vocal fold secondary to endotracheal intubation, bronchoscopy or esophagogastroduodenoscopy. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case series. METHODS: Review of cases at a single tertiary institution with evaluation of patient demographic characteristics, time to presentation, time to treatment, and clinical outcomes. RESULTS: Thirteen adult patients were identified with postintervention granuloma of the membranous vocal fold. All patients were female, with a mean age of 60 years (range, 28-81 years). None noted hoarseness prior to the intervention, and all noted significant hoarseness postoperatively. Conservative treatment with proton pump inhibitors and vocal rest was initially implemented in all patients. Four cases resolved without further intervention. Nine underwent surgical management because of airway symptoms, failure to improve, or patient request. One patient had injury to the contralateral vocal fold upon intubation. None experienced recurrence. Five had complete recovery of voice postoperatively, four did not. CONCLUSION: Iatrogenic granulomas of the membranous vocal fold after intubation or other upper airway instrumentation are rare complications presenting in the early postprocedure period with worsening hoarseness. Initial conservative treatment may be sufficient to yield resolution, and surgical treatment is effective for those failing medical management. Permanent voice damage may result from the original injury. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4 Laryngoscope, 129:441-447, 2019. SN - 1531-4995 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30208219/Granulomas_of_the_membranous_vocal_fold_after_intubation_and_other_airway_instrumentation_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/lary.27492 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -