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Production of pharmaceutical proteins by transgenic animals.
Rev Sci Tech 2018; 37(1):131-139RS

Abstract

Proteins are involved in a majority of the biochemical events that take place in all living organisms. Protein synthesis is directed by genes. All genes contain two major DNA regions. The region containing the genetic message proper (the 'coding region') is preceded by a regulatory region ('the promoter'), which determines when and in which organs a given gene must produce the corresponding protein. The techniques of genetic engineering allow the association of the coding region from one gene with the regulatory region from another gene. The expression of these recombinant genes may be achieved in cultured cells, in transgenic animals or in plants. This leads to the production of the corresponding proteins, including pharmaceutical proteins. Milk from transgenic animals is one potential source of pharmaceutical proteins. To achieve this, the promoters from milk protein genes are bound to DNA fragments containing the coding region of the genes of interest. The desired proteins are then taken from the milk and purified. Two human pharmaceutical proteins are on the market and about 20 projects are in development. One of the proteins produced in milk, antithrombin III, is an anticoagulant and the other, human C1-esterase inhibitor, is an anti-inflammatory. Several human proteins have been produced in the egg white of transgenic chickens and one has been approved by the United States Federal Drug Administration. This process has also been used to modify antibodies in cows. The genes that code for antibodies in the cow were deleted and replaced by human antibody genes. These cows, immunised by various antigens, then secreted purely human antibodies in their blood. Antibodies from such cows were able to attenuate the effects of Ebola virus in human patients.

Authors

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30209423

Citation

Houdebine, L-M. "Production of Pharmaceutical Proteins By Transgenic Animals." Revue Scientifique Et Technique (International Office of Epizootics), vol. 37, no. 1, 2018, pp. 131-139.
Houdebine LM. Production of pharmaceutical proteins by transgenic animals. Rev - Off Int Epizoot. 2018;37(1):131-139.
Houdebine, L. M. (2018). Production of pharmaceutical proteins by transgenic animals. Revue Scientifique Et Technique (International Office of Epizootics), 37(1), pp. 131-139. doi:10.20506/rst.37.1.2746.
Houdebine LM. Production of Pharmaceutical Proteins By Transgenic Animals. Rev - Off Int Epizoot. 2018;37(1):131-139. PubMed PMID: 30209423.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Production of pharmaceutical proteins by transgenic animals. A1 - Houdebine,L-M, PY - 2018/9/14/entrez PY - 2018/9/14/pubmed PY - 2018/10/20/medline KW - Blood KW - Egg white KW - Milk KW - Pharmaceutical protein KW - Transgenic animal SP - 131 EP - 139 JF - Revue scientifique et technique (International Office of Epizootics) JO - Rev. - Off. Int. Epizoot. VL - 37 IS - 1 N2 - Proteins are involved in a majority of the biochemical events that take place in all living organisms. Protein synthesis is directed by genes. All genes contain two major DNA regions. The region containing the genetic message proper (the 'coding region') is preceded by a regulatory region ('the promoter'), which determines when and in which organs a given gene must produce the corresponding protein. The techniques of genetic engineering allow the association of the coding region from one gene with the regulatory region from another gene. The expression of these recombinant genes may be achieved in cultured cells, in transgenic animals or in plants. This leads to the production of the corresponding proteins, including pharmaceutical proteins. Milk from transgenic animals is one potential source of pharmaceutical proteins. To achieve this, the promoters from milk protein genes are bound to DNA fragments containing the coding region of the genes of interest. The desired proteins are then taken from the milk and purified. Two human pharmaceutical proteins are on the market and about 20 projects are in development. One of the proteins produced in milk, antithrombin III, is an anticoagulant and the other, human C1-esterase inhibitor, is an anti-inflammatory. Several human proteins have been produced in the egg white of transgenic chickens and one has been approved by the United States Federal Drug Administration. This process has also been used to modify antibodies in cows. The genes that code for antibodies in the cow were deleted and replaced by human antibody genes. These cows, immunised by various antigens, then secreted purely human antibodies in their blood. Antibodies from such cows were able to attenuate the effects of Ebola virus in human patients. SN - 0253-1933 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30209423/Production_of_pharmaceutical_proteins_by_transgenic_animals DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -