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Variability of the cortisol awakening response and morning salivary oxytocin in late adolescence.
J Neuroendocrinol. 2018 11; 30(11):e12645.JN

Abstract

Exogenously administered oxytocin interacts with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to modulate endogenous cortisol levels, suggesting a synergistic role for these two hormones in the response to stress, cognitive performance and the development of psycho-behavioural disorders. The cortisol awakening response (CAR) is considered a reliable measure of HPA axis function in humans. However, the CAR appears to vary considerably from day to day and may be strongly influenced by the anticipated demands of the day ahead. The level of variation intrinsic to the CAR is unclear because few studies have examined the CAR in the absence of daily environmental variation. It is not known whether oxytocin has a similar or complementary awakening response. Therefore, over three consecutive days, we examined 12 adolescents (aged 15-17 years) in a highly-controlled sleep laboratory. Saliva was collected on days 4-6 of a 9-day laboratory visit. Cortisol and oxytocin levels were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay from saliva sampled at 0, 15, 30 and 45 minutes, and 8 and 12 hours post-awakening. CAR magnitude varied between days and was associated with sleep duration and pre-awakening sleep stage. Conversely, oxytocin levels dropped dramatically in the first 15 minutes post-awakening and were highly consistent across participants and days. Older participants had higher awakening oxytocin concentrations. Although cortisol increases and oxytocin rapidly declines upon awakening, their diurnal variation does not appear to be related at basal, peripheral levels, consistent with a previous finding that exogenously administered oxytocin only modulates cortisol under conditions of stress.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Adelaide Medical School, Robinson Research Institute, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.Adelaide Medical School, Robinson Research Institute, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.Adelaide Medical School, Robinson Research Institute, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.Discipline of Pharmacology, Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.Centre for Sleep Research, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia. School of Psychology, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia.Adelaide Medical School, Robinson Research Institute, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia.Adelaide Medical School, Robinson Research Institute, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.Adelaide Medical School, Robinson Research Institute, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30216577

Citation

Van Dam, Jago M., et al. "Variability of the Cortisol Awakening Response and Morning Salivary Oxytocin in Late Adolescence." Journal of Neuroendocrinology, vol. 30, no. 11, 2018, pp. e12645.
Van Dam JM, Garrett AJ, Schneider LA, et al. Variability of the cortisol awakening response and morning salivary oxytocin in late adolescence. J Neuroendocrinol. 2018;30(11):e12645.
Van Dam, J. M., Garrett, A. J., Schneider, L. A., Buisman-Pijlman, F. T. A., Short, M. A., Hodyl, N. A., Edwards, H. K., Goldsworthy, M. R., & Pitcher, J. B. (2018). Variability of the cortisol awakening response and morning salivary oxytocin in late adolescence. Journal of Neuroendocrinology, 30(11), e12645. https://doi.org/10.1111/jne.12645
Van Dam JM, et al. Variability of the Cortisol Awakening Response and Morning Salivary Oxytocin in Late Adolescence. J Neuroendocrinol. 2018;30(11):e12645. PubMed PMID: 30216577.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Variability of the cortisol awakening response and morning salivary oxytocin in late adolescence. AU - Van Dam,Jago M, AU - Garrett,Amy J, AU - Schneider,Luke A, AU - Buisman-Pijlman,Femke T A, AU - Short,Michelle A, AU - Hodyl,Nicolette A, AU - Edwards,Hannah K, AU - Goldsworthy,Mitchell R, AU - Pitcher,Julia B, Y1 - 2018/11/07/ PY - 2018/04/26/received PY - 2018/08/19/revised PY - 2018/09/10/accepted PY - 2018/9/15/pubmed PY - 2019/10/1/medline PY - 2018/9/15/entrez KW - cortisol KW - cortisol awakening response KW - hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis KW - oxytocin KW - saliva KW - sleep SP - e12645 EP - e12645 JF - Journal of neuroendocrinology JO - J Neuroendocrinol VL - 30 IS - 11 N2 - Exogenously administered oxytocin interacts with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to modulate endogenous cortisol levels, suggesting a synergistic role for these two hormones in the response to stress, cognitive performance and the development of psycho-behavioural disorders. The cortisol awakening response (CAR) is considered a reliable measure of HPA axis function in humans. However, the CAR appears to vary considerably from day to day and may be strongly influenced by the anticipated demands of the day ahead. The level of variation intrinsic to the CAR is unclear because few studies have examined the CAR in the absence of daily environmental variation. It is not known whether oxytocin has a similar or complementary awakening response. Therefore, over three consecutive days, we examined 12 adolescents (aged 15-17 years) in a highly-controlled sleep laboratory. Saliva was collected on days 4-6 of a 9-day laboratory visit. Cortisol and oxytocin levels were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay from saliva sampled at 0, 15, 30 and 45 minutes, and 8 and 12 hours post-awakening. CAR magnitude varied between days and was associated with sleep duration and pre-awakening sleep stage. Conversely, oxytocin levels dropped dramatically in the first 15 minutes post-awakening and were highly consistent across participants and days. Older participants had higher awakening oxytocin concentrations. Although cortisol increases and oxytocin rapidly declines upon awakening, their diurnal variation does not appear to be related at basal, peripheral levels, consistent with a previous finding that exogenously administered oxytocin only modulates cortisol under conditions of stress. SN - 1365-2826 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30216577/Variability_of_the_cortisol_awakening_response_and_morning_salivary_oxytocin_in_late_adolescence_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -