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Marine Metazoan Modern Mass Extinction: Improving Predictions by Integrating Fossil, Modern, and Physiological Data.
Ann Rev Mar Sci. 2019 01 03; 11:369-390.AR

Abstract

Evolution, extinction, and dispersion are fundamental processes affecting marine biodiversity. Until recently, studies of extant marine systems focused mainly on evolution and dispersion, with extinction receiving less attention. Past extinction events have, however, helped shape the evolutionary history of marine ecosystems, with ecological and evolutionary legacies still evident in modern seas. Current anthropogenic global changes increase extinction risk and pose a significant threat to marine ecosystems, which are critical for human use and sustenance. The evaluation of these threats and the likely responses of marine ecosystems requires a better understanding of evolutionary processes that affect marine ecosystems under global change. Here, we discuss how knowledge of (a) changes in biodiversity of ancient marine ecosystems to past extinctions events, (b) the patterns of sensitivity and biodiversity loss in modern marine taxa, and (c) the physiological mechanisms underpinning species' sensitivity to global change can be exploited and integrated to advance our critical thinking in this area.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Département de Biologie, Chimie et Géographie, Université du Québec à Rimouski, Rimouski, Quebec G5L 3A1, Canada; email: piero_calosi@uqar.ca , fanny.vermandele@uqar.ca.Department of Biological Sciences, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island 02881, USA; email: hputnam@uri.edu.Department of Earth Sciences, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD, United Kingdom; email: r.twitchett@nhm.ac.uk.Département de Biologie, Chimie et Géographie, Université du Québec à Rimouski, Rimouski, Quebec G5L 3A1, Canada; email: piero_calosi@uqar.ca , fanny.vermandele@uqar.ca.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30216738

Citation

Calosi, Piero, et al. "Marine Metazoan Modern Mass Extinction: Improving Predictions By Integrating Fossil, Modern, and Physiological Data." Annual Review of Marine Science, vol. 11, 2019, pp. 369-390.
Calosi P, Putnam HM, Twitchett RJ, et al. Marine Metazoan Modern Mass Extinction: Improving Predictions by Integrating Fossil, Modern, and Physiological Data. Ann Rev Mar Sci. 2019;11:369-390.
Calosi, P., Putnam, H. M., Twitchett, R. J., & Vermandele, F. (2019). Marine Metazoan Modern Mass Extinction: Improving Predictions by Integrating Fossil, Modern, and Physiological Data. Annual Review of Marine Science, 11, 369-390. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-marine-010318-095106
Calosi P, et al. Marine Metazoan Modern Mass Extinction: Improving Predictions By Integrating Fossil, Modern, and Physiological Data. Ann Rev Mar Sci. 2019 01 3;11:369-390. PubMed PMID: 30216738.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Marine Metazoan Modern Mass Extinction: Improving Predictions by Integrating Fossil, Modern, and Physiological Data. AU - Calosi,Piero, AU - Putnam,Hollie M, AU - Twitchett,Richard J, AU - Vermandele,Fanny, Y1 - 2018/09/14/ PY - 2018/9/15/pubmed PY - 2020/4/16/medline PY - 2018/9/15/entrez KW - body size KW - energetics KW - global warming KW - hypoxia KW - ocean acidification KW - rarity SP - 369 EP - 390 JF - Annual review of marine science JO - Ann Rev Mar Sci VL - 11 N2 - Evolution, extinction, and dispersion are fundamental processes affecting marine biodiversity. Until recently, studies of extant marine systems focused mainly on evolution and dispersion, with extinction receiving less attention. Past extinction events have, however, helped shape the evolutionary history of marine ecosystems, with ecological and evolutionary legacies still evident in modern seas. Current anthropogenic global changes increase extinction risk and pose a significant threat to marine ecosystems, which are critical for human use and sustenance. The evaluation of these threats and the likely responses of marine ecosystems requires a better understanding of evolutionary processes that affect marine ecosystems under global change. Here, we discuss how knowledge of (a) changes in biodiversity of ancient marine ecosystems to past extinctions events, (b) the patterns of sensitivity and biodiversity loss in modern marine taxa, and (c) the physiological mechanisms underpinning species' sensitivity to global change can be exploited and integrated to advance our critical thinking in this area. SN - 1941-0611 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30216738/Marine_Metazoan_Modern_Mass_Extinction:_Improving_Predictions_by_Integrating_Fossil_Modern_and_Physiological_Data_ L2 - https://arjournals.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-marine-010318-095106?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -