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Seroepidemiology of Burkholderia pseudomallei, Etiologic Agent of Melioidosis, in the Ouest and Sud-Est Departments of Haiti.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2018 11; 99(5):1222-1228.AJ

Abstract

Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiological agent of melioidosis, has been hypothesized to be endemic throughout the Caribbean, including the impoverished nation of Haiti. However, because of the protean clinical manifestations, presence of asymptomatic infections, and limited medical diagnostic capacity, the identification of active melioidosis cases remains challenging. A seroepidemiological study was conducted using a novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect antibodies toward B. pseudomallei in the native population. The performance of an indirect ELISA with purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from B. pseudomallei was evaluated using serum collected from rhesus macaques exposed to aerosolized B. pseudomallei. After optimization, serum collected from asymptomatic population members (n = 756) was screened for polyvalent (immunoglobulin M [IgM]/ immunoglobulin G [IgG]/ immunoglobulin A) and monoclonal (IgG or IgM) immunoglobulins against B. pseudomallei LPS. The population seroprevalence was 11.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 9.2, 13.8) for polyvalent immunoglobulins, 9.8% (95% CI: 7.7, 11.9) for IgG, and 1.7% (95% CI: 0.8, 2.6%) for IgM. The seroprevalence was not significantly different by gender (P = 0.16), but increased significantly (P < 0.001) with age, yielding an estimated annual seroconversion rate of 1.05% (95% CI: 0.81, 1.3). The detection of both recent (IgM+) and previous (IgG+) exposure to B. pseudomallei provides serological evidence that melioidosis is endemic in Haiti.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University, Miami, Florida.Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.Department of Global and Community Health, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia.Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.Department of Environmental and Global Health, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.Battelle Biomedical Research Center, Columbus, Ohio.Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30226137

Citation

Weppelmann, Thomas A., et al. "Seroepidemiology of Burkholderia Pseudomallei, Etiologic Agent of Melioidosis, in the Ouest and Sud-Est Departments of Haiti." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 99, no. 5, 2018, pp. 1222-1228.
Weppelmann TA, Norris MH, von Fricken ME, et al. Seroepidemiology of Burkholderia pseudomallei, Etiologic Agent of Melioidosis, in the Ouest and Sud-Est Departments of Haiti. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2018;99(5):1222-1228.
Weppelmann, T. A., Norris, M. H., von Fricken, M. E., Rahman Khan, M. S., Okech, B. A., Cannella, A. P., Schweizer, H. P., Sanford, D. C., & Tuanyok, A. (2018). Seroepidemiology of Burkholderia pseudomallei, Etiologic Agent of Melioidosis, in the Ouest and Sud-Est Departments of Haiti. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 99(5), 1222-1228. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.18-0352
Weppelmann TA, et al. Seroepidemiology of Burkholderia Pseudomallei, Etiologic Agent of Melioidosis, in the Ouest and Sud-Est Departments of Haiti. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2018;99(5):1222-1228. PubMed PMID: 30226137.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Seroepidemiology of Burkholderia pseudomallei, Etiologic Agent of Melioidosis, in the Ouest and Sud-Est Departments of Haiti. AU - Weppelmann,Thomas A, AU - Norris,Michael H, AU - von Fricken,Michael E, AU - Rahman Khan,Md Siddiqur, AU - Okech,Bernard A, AU - Cannella,Anthony P, AU - Schweizer,Herbert P, AU - Sanford,Daniel C, AU - Tuanyok,Apichai, PY - 2018/9/19/pubmed PY - 2019/9/10/medline PY - 2018/9/19/entrez SP - 1222 EP - 1228 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. VL - 99 IS - 5 N2 - Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiological agent of melioidosis, has been hypothesized to be endemic throughout the Caribbean, including the impoverished nation of Haiti. However, because of the protean clinical manifestations, presence of asymptomatic infections, and limited medical diagnostic capacity, the identification of active melioidosis cases remains challenging. A seroepidemiological study was conducted using a novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect antibodies toward B. pseudomallei in the native population. The performance of an indirect ELISA with purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from B. pseudomallei was evaluated using serum collected from rhesus macaques exposed to aerosolized B. pseudomallei. After optimization, serum collected from asymptomatic population members (n = 756) was screened for polyvalent (immunoglobulin M [IgM]/ immunoglobulin G [IgG]/ immunoglobulin A) and monoclonal (IgG or IgM) immunoglobulins against B. pseudomallei LPS. The population seroprevalence was 11.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 9.2, 13.8) for polyvalent immunoglobulins, 9.8% (95% CI: 7.7, 11.9) for IgG, and 1.7% (95% CI: 0.8, 2.6%) for IgM. The seroprevalence was not significantly different by gender (P = 0.16), but increased significantly (P < 0.001) with age, yielding an estimated annual seroconversion rate of 1.05% (95% CI: 0.81, 1.3). The detection of both recent (IgM+) and previous (IgG+) exposure to B. pseudomallei provides serological evidence that melioidosis is endemic in Haiti. SN - 1476-1645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30226137/Seroepidemiology_of_Burkholderia_pseudomallei_Etiologic_Agent_of_Melioidosis_in_the_Ouest_and_Sud_Est_Departments_of_Haiti_ L2 - http://www.ajtmh.org/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.18-0352?crawler=true&amp;mimetype=application/pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -