Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Mimiviridae: An Expanding Family of Highly Diverse Large dsDNA Viruses Infecting a Wide Phylogenetic Range of Aquatic Eukaryotes.
Viruses. 2018 09 18; 10(9)V

Abstract

Since 1998, when Jim van Etten's team initiated its characterization, Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1) had been the largest known DNA virus, both in terms of particle size and genome complexity. In 2003, the Acanthamoeba-infecting Mimivirus unexpectedly superseded PBCV-1, opening the era of giant viruses, i.e., with virions large enough to be visible by light microscopy and genomes encoding more proteins than many bacteria. During the following 15 years, the isolation of many Mimivirus relatives has made Mimiviridae one of the largest and most diverse families of eukaryotic viruses, most of which have been isolated from aquatic environments. Metagenomic studies of various ecosystems (including soils) suggest that many more remain to be isolated. As Mimiviridae members are found to infect an increasing range of phytoplankton species, their taxonomic position compared to the traditional Phycodnaviridae (i.e., etymologically "algal viruses") became a source of confusion in the literature. Following a quick historical review of the key discoveries that established the Mimiviridae family, we describe its current taxonomic structure and propose a set of operational criteria to help in the classification of future isolates.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, IGS, Structural and Genomic Information Laboratory (UMR7256), Mediterranean Institute of Microbiology (FR3479), 163 Avenue de Luminy, F-13288 Marseille, France. jean-michel.claverie@univ-amu.fr.Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, IGS, Structural and Genomic Information Laboratory (UMR7256), Mediterranean Institute of Microbiology (FR3479), 163 Avenue de Luminy, F-13288 Marseille, France. chantal.abergel@igs.cnrs-mrs.fr.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30231528

Citation

Claverie, Jean-Michel, and Chantal Abergel. "Mimiviridae: an Expanding Family of Highly Diverse Large dsDNA Viruses Infecting a Wide Phylogenetic Range of Aquatic Eukaryotes." Viruses, vol. 10, no. 9, 2018.
Claverie JM, Abergel C. Mimiviridae: An Expanding Family of Highly Diverse Large dsDNA Viruses Infecting a Wide Phylogenetic Range of Aquatic Eukaryotes. Viruses. 2018;10(9).
Claverie, J. M., & Abergel, C. (2018). Mimiviridae: An Expanding Family of Highly Diverse Large dsDNA Viruses Infecting a Wide Phylogenetic Range of Aquatic Eukaryotes. Viruses, 10(9). https://doi.org/10.3390/v10090506
Claverie JM, Abergel C. Mimiviridae: an Expanding Family of Highly Diverse Large dsDNA Viruses Infecting a Wide Phylogenetic Range of Aquatic Eukaryotes. Viruses. 2018 09 18;10(9) PubMed PMID: 30231528.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mimiviridae: An Expanding Family of Highly Diverse Large dsDNA Viruses Infecting a Wide Phylogenetic Range of Aquatic Eukaryotes. AU - Claverie,Jean-Michel, AU - Abergel,Chantal, Y1 - 2018/09/18/ PY - 2018/08/14/received PY - 2018/09/13/revised PY - 2018/09/15/accepted PY - 2018/9/21/entrez PY - 2018/9/21/pubmed PY - 2018/11/18/medline KW - Mimiviridae KW - Phycodnaviridae KW - algal virus KW - aquatic virus KW - giant virus JF - Viruses JO - Viruses VL - 10 IS - 9 N2 - Since 1998, when Jim van Etten's team initiated its characterization, Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1) had been the largest known DNA virus, both in terms of particle size and genome complexity. In 2003, the Acanthamoeba-infecting Mimivirus unexpectedly superseded PBCV-1, opening the era of giant viruses, i.e., with virions large enough to be visible by light microscopy and genomes encoding more proteins than many bacteria. During the following 15 years, the isolation of many Mimivirus relatives has made Mimiviridae one of the largest and most diverse families of eukaryotic viruses, most of which have been isolated from aquatic environments. Metagenomic studies of various ecosystems (including soils) suggest that many more remain to be isolated. As Mimiviridae members are found to infect an increasing range of phytoplankton species, their taxonomic position compared to the traditional Phycodnaviridae (i.e., etymologically "algal viruses") became a source of confusion in the literature. Following a quick historical review of the key discoveries that established the Mimiviridae family, we describe its current taxonomic structure and propose a set of operational criteria to help in the classification of future isolates. SN - 1999-4915 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30231528/Mimiviridae:_An_Expanding_Family_of_Highly_Diverse_Large_dsDNA_Viruses_Infecting_a_Wide_Phylogenetic_Range_of_Aquatic_Eukaryotes_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=v10090506 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -