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The role of adjuvant probiotics to attenuate intestinal inflammatory responses due to cancer treatments.
Benef Microbes 2018; 9(6):899-916BM

Abstract

Chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment regimens for gastrointestinal, peritoneal and pelvic tumours can disrupt the intestinal microbiome and intestinal epithelia. Such disturbances can provoke symptoms such as diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy induced gastrointestinal toxicity aggravating intestinal microbiome dysbiosis is postulated to adversely alter the intestinal microbiome, with a consequent induced pro-inflammatory effect that disrupts the intestinal microbiome-epithelia-mucosal immunity axis. Although not widely recognised, the intestinal mucosa is the largest and most densely and dynamically populated immune-environment. Cancer treatment adverse effects that affect intestinal and mucosal cells inadvertently target and disrupt resident intestinal macrophages, the cells that marshal immune activity in the intestinal mucosa by shaping pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory activities to control and eradicate infectious insults and maintain local homeostasis. Pathobionts (bacteria capable of pathogenic pro-inflammatory activity) and noxious environmental and bacterial antigens use the intestinal epithelia and gap junctions as a point of entry into the systemic circulation. This translocation movement promotes toxic sequelae that obstruct intestinal macrophage functions resulting in uncontrolled local and systemic pro-inflammatory activity, loss of phagocytic function and loss of expression of tight junction proteins. Probiotic bacteria as an adjunctive treatment shows efficacy in ameliorating enteropathies such as mucositis/diarrhoea resulting from chemotherapy or radiotherapy regimens. As such we posit that an important benefit that warrants a further focused research effort is the administration of adjuvant probiotics to help reduce the incidence of febrile neutropenia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 The University of Sydney, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, NSW 2006, Australia.1 The University of Sydney, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, NSW 2006, Australia. 2 Northern Clinical School, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, Pacific Hwy, St Leonards NSW 2065, Australia.1 The University of Sydney, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, NSW 2006, Australia. 3 Medlab Clinical Ltd., 66 McCauley St., Sydney, 2006 NSW, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30232908

Citation

Thomsen, M, et al. "The Role of Adjuvant Probiotics to Attenuate Intestinal Inflammatory Responses Due to Cancer Treatments." Beneficial Microbes, vol. 9, no. 6, 2018, pp. 899-916.
Thomsen M, Clarke S, Vitetta L. The role of adjuvant probiotics to attenuate intestinal inflammatory responses due to cancer treatments. Benef Microbes. 2018;9(6):899-916.
Thomsen, M., Clarke, S., & Vitetta, L. (2018). The role of adjuvant probiotics to attenuate intestinal inflammatory responses due to cancer treatments. Beneficial Microbes, 9(6), pp. 899-916. doi:10.3920/BM2017.0172.
Thomsen M, Clarke S, Vitetta L. The Role of Adjuvant Probiotics to Attenuate Intestinal Inflammatory Responses Due to Cancer Treatments. Benef Microbes. 2018 Dec 7;9(6):899-916. PubMed PMID: 30232908.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The role of adjuvant probiotics to attenuate intestinal inflammatory responses due to cancer treatments. AU - Thomsen,M, AU - Clarke,S, AU - Vitetta,L, Y1 - 2018/09/20/ PY - 2018/9/21/pubmed PY - 2019/10/1/medline PY - 2018/9/21/entrez KW - chemotherapy KW - intestinal microbiome KW - mucosal immunity KW - radiotherapy SP - 899 EP - 916 JF - Beneficial microbes JO - Benef Microbes VL - 9 IS - 6 N2 - Chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment regimens for gastrointestinal, peritoneal and pelvic tumours can disrupt the intestinal microbiome and intestinal epithelia. Such disturbances can provoke symptoms such as diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy induced gastrointestinal toxicity aggravating intestinal microbiome dysbiosis is postulated to adversely alter the intestinal microbiome, with a consequent induced pro-inflammatory effect that disrupts the intestinal microbiome-epithelia-mucosal immunity axis. Although not widely recognised, the intestinal mucosa is the largest and most densely and dynamically populated immune-environment. Cancer treatment adverse effects that affect intestinal and mucosal cells inadvertently target and disrupt resident intestinal macrophages, the cells that marshal immune activity in the intestinal mucosa by shaping pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory activities to control and eradicate infectious insults and maintain local homeostasis. Pathobionts (bacteria capable of pathogenic pro-inflammatory activity) and noxious environmental and bacterial antigens use the intestinal epithelia and gap junctions as a point of entry into the systemic circulation. This translocation movement promotes toxic sequelae that obstruct intestinal macrophage functions resulting in uncontrolled local and systemic pro-inflammatory activity, loss of phagocytic function and loss of expression of tight junction proteins. Probiotic bacteria as an adjunctive treatment shows efficacy in ameliorating enteropathies such as mucositis/diarrhoea resulting from chemotherapy or radiotherapy regimens. As such we posit that an important benefit that warrants a further focused research effort is the administration of adjuvant probiotics to help reduce the incidence of febrile neutropenia. SN - 1876-2891 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30232908/The_role_of_adjuvant_probiotics_to_attenuate_intestinal_inflammatory_responses_due_to_cancer_treatments_ L2 - http://www.wageningenacademic.com/doi/full/10.3920/BM2017.0172?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -