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Silk genes and silk gene expression in the spider Tengella perfuga (Zoropsidae), including a potential cribellar spidroin (CrSp).
PLoS One 2018; 13(9):e0203563Plos

Abstract

Most spiders spin multiple types of silk, including silks for reproduction, prey capture, and draglines. Spiders are a megadiverse group and the majority of spider silks remain uncharacterized. For example, nothing is known about the silk molecules of Tengella perfuga, a spider that spins sheet webs lined with cribellar silk. Cribellar silk is a type of adhesive capture thread composed of numerous fibrils that originate from a specialized plate-like spinning organ called the cribellum. The predominant components of spider silks are spidroins, members of a protein family synthesized in silk glands. Here, we use silk gland RNA-Seq and cDNA libraries to infer T. perfuga silks at the protein level. We show that T. perfuga spiders express 13 silk transcripts representing at least five categories of spider silk proteins (spidroins). One category is a candidate for cribellar silk and is thus named cribellar spidroin (CrSp). Studies of ontogenetic changes in web construction and spigot morphology in T. perfuga have documented that after sexual maturation, T. perfuga females continue to make capture webs but males halt web maintenance and cease spinning cribellar silk. Consistent with these observations, our candidate CrSp was expressed only in females. The other four spidroin categories correspond to paralogs of aciniform, ampullate, pyriform, and tubuliform spidroins. These spidroins are associated with egg sac and web construction. Except for the tubuliform spidroin, the spidroins from T. perfuga contain novel combinations of amino acid sequence motifs that have not been observed before in these spidroin types. Characterization of T. perfuga silk genes, particularly CrSp, expand the diversity of the spidroin family and inspire new structure/function hypotheses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, University of California, Riverside, California, United States of America.Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, University of California, Riverside, California, United States of America. Department of Neurology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon, United States of America.Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, University of California, Riverside, California, United States of America. J. Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America.Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, University of California, Riverside, California, United States of America.Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, University of California, Riverside, California, United States of America.Division of Arthropods, Museum of Southwestern Biology, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States of America.Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, University of California, Riverside, California, United States of America. Division of Invertebrate Zoology and Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York, United States of America.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30235223

Citation

Correa-Garhwal, Sandra M., et al. "Silk Genes and Silk Gene Expression in the Spider Tengella Perfuga (Zoropsidae), Including a Potential Cribellar Spidroin (CrSp)." PloS One, vol. 13, no. 9, 2018, pp. e0203563.
Correa-Garhwal SM, Chaw RC, Clarke TH, et al. Silk genes and silk gene expression in the spider Tengella perfuga (Zoropsidae), including a potential cribellar spidroin (CrSp). PLoS ONE. 2018;13(9):e0203563.
Correa-Garhwal, S. M., Chaw, R. C., Clarke, T. H., Alaniz, L. G., Chan, F. S., Alfaro, R. E., & Hayashi, C. Y. (2018). Silk genes and silk gene expression in the spider Tengella perfuga (Zoropsidae), including a potential cribellar spidroin (CrSp). PloS One, 13(9), pp. e0203563. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0203563.
Correa-Garhwal SM, et al. Silk Genes and Silk Gene Expression in the Spider Tengella Perfuga (Zoropsidae), Including a Potential Cribellar Spidroin (CrSp). PLoS ONE. 2018;13(9):e0203563. PubMed PMID: 30235223.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Silk genes and silk gene expression in the spider Tengella perfuga (Zoropsidae), including a potential cribellar spidroin (CrSp). AU - Correa-Garhwal,Sandra M, AU - Chaw,R Crystal, AU - Clarke,Thomas H,3rd AU - Alaniz,Liliana G, AU - Chan,Fanny S, AU - Alfaro,Rachael E, AU - Hayashi,Cheryl Y, Y1 - 2018/09/20/ PY - 2018/03/04/received PY - 2018/07/27/accepted PY - 2018/9/21/entrez PY - 2018/9/21/pubmed PY - 2019/2/27/medline SP - e0203563 EP - e0203563 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 13 IS - 9 N2 - Most spiders spin multiple types of silk, including silks for reproduction, prey capture, and draglines. Spiders are a megadiverse group and the majority of spider silks remain uncharacterized. For example, nothing is known about the silk molecules of Tengella perfuga, a spider that spins sheet webs lined with cribellar silk. Cribellar silk is a type of adhesive capture thread composed of numerous fibrils that originate from a specialized plate-like spinning organ called the cribellum. The predominant components of spider silks are spidroins, members of a protein family synthesized in silk glands. Here, we use silk gland RNA-Seq and cDNA libraries to infer T. perfuga silks at the protein level. We show that T. perfuga spiders express 13 silk transcripts representing at least five categories of spider silk proteins (spidroins). One category is a candidate for cribellar silk and is thus named cribellar spidroin (CrSp). Studies of ontogenetic changes in web construction and spigot morphology in T. perfuga have documented that after sexual maturation, T. perfuga females continue to make capture webs but males halt web maintenance and cease spinning cribellar silk. Consistent with these observations, our candidate CrSp was expressed only in females. The other four spidroin categories correspond to paralogs of aciniform, ampullate, pyriform, and tubuliform spidroins. These spidroins are associated with egg sac and web construction. Except for the tubuliform spidroin, the spidroins from T. perfuga contain novel combinations of amino acid sequence motifs that have not been observed before in these spidroin types. Characterization of T. perfuga silk genes, particularly CrSp, expand the diversity of the spidroin family and inspire new structure/function hypotheses. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30235223/Silk_genes_and_silk_gene_expression_in_the_spider_Tengella_perfuga__Zoropsidae__including_a_potential_cribellar_spidroin__CrSp__ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0203563 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -