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Fish consumption and risk of depression: Epidemiological evidence from prospective studies.
Asia Pac Psychiatry. 2018 Dec; 10(4):e12335.AP

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The evidence on the association of fish or omega-3 fatty acid intake with depression is inconsistent. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to examine this association.

METHODS

Database searches in PubMed and Web of Science were conducted to identify relevant articles published up to April 2018, which were supplemented by hand-searches of reference lists of the retrieved articles. Using a random-effects model, we calculated pooled relative risks (RR) of depression in relation to consumption of fish or omega-3 fatty acids after adjusting for potential confounders.

RESULTS

A total of 10 prospective cohort studies with 6672 cases of depression among 109 764 participants were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled adjusted RR of depression for the highest vs lowest category of fish consumption was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.80-0.99). The pooled adjusted RR of depression for the highest vs lowest category of omega-3 intake was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.74-1.04). In the dose-response analysis, the pooled adjusted RRs for an increment of 1 serving/week of fish consumption and 500 mg/day of omega-3 fatty acid intake were 0.89 (95% CI: 0.75-1.04) and 0.99 (95% CI: 0.94-1.04), respectively. There was no evidence of heterogeneity.

DISCUSSION

Our findings provide quantitative evidence for a modest inverse association between fish or omega-3 fatty acid intake and risk of depression, especially in women. These findings from the observational studies need to be confirmed through large randomized clinical trials of fish consumption or omega-3 fatty acid intake and risk of depression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, South Korea.Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, South Korea.Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, South Korea.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30238628

Citation

Yang, Yeonji, et al. "Fish Consumption and Risk of Depression: Epidemiological Evidence From Prospective Studies." Asia-Pacific Psychiatry : Official Journal of the Pacific Rim College of Psychiatrists, vol. 10, no. 4, 2018, pp. e12335.
Yang Y, Kim Y, Je Y. Fish consumption and risk of depression: Epidemiological evidence from prospective studies. Asia Pac Psychiatry. 2018;10(4):e12335.
Yang, Y., Kim, Y., & Je, Y. (2018). Fish consumption and risk of depression: Epidemiological evidence from prospective studies. Asia-Pacific Psychiatry : Official Journal of the Pacific Rim College of Psychiatrists, 10(4), e12335. https://doi.org/10.1111/appy.12335
Yang Y, Kim Y, Je Y. Fish Consumption and Risk of Depression: Epidemiological Evidence From Prospective Studies. Asia Pac Psychiatry. 2018;10(4):e12335. PubMed PMID: 30238628.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fish consumption and risk of depression: Epidemiological evidence from prospective studies. AU - Yang,Yeonji, AU - Kim,Youngyo, AU - Je,Youjin, Y1 - 2018/09/20/ PY - 2018/01/26/received PY - 2018/08/13/accepted PY - 2018/9/22/pubmed PY - 2019/5/16/medline PY - 2018/9/22/entrez KW - depression KW - depressive disorder KW - fish KW - meta-analysis KW - omega-3 fatty acids SP - e12335 EP - e12335 JF - Asia-Pacific psychiatry : official journal of the Pacific Rim College of Psychiatrists JO - Asia Pac Psychiatry VL - 10 IS - 4 N2 - INTRODUCTION: The evidence on the association of fish or omega-3 fatty acid intake with depression is inconsistent. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to examine this association. METHODS: Database searches in PubMed and Web of Science were conducted to identify relevant articles published up to April 2018, which were supplemented by hand-searches of reference lists of the retrieved articles. Using a random-effects model, we calculated pooled relative risks (RR) of depression in relation to consumption of fish or omega-3 fatty acids after adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: A total of 10 prospective cohort studies with 6672 cases of depression among 109 764 participants were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled adjusted RR of depression for the highest vs lowest category of fish consumption was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.80-0.99). The pooled adjusted RR of depression for the highest vs lowest category of omega-3 intake was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.74-1.04). In the dose-response analysis, the pooled adjusted RRs for an increment of 1 serving/week of fish consumption and 500 mg/day of omega-3 fatty acid intake were 0.89 (95% CI: 0.75-1.04) and 0.99 (95% CI: 0.94-1.04), respectively. There was no evidence of heterogeneity. DISCUSSION: Our findings provide quantitative evidence for a modest inverse association between fish or omega-3 fatty acid intake and risk of depression, especially in women. These findings from the observational studies need to be confirmed through large randomized clinical trials of fish consumption or omega-3 fatty acid intake and risk of depression. SN - 1758-5872 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30238628/Fish_consumption_and_risk_of_depression:_Epidemiological_evidence_from_prospective_studies_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -