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Sex Differences in Pulmonary Responses to Ozone in Mice. Role of the Microbiome.
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 2019; 60(2):198-208AJ

Abstract

We have previously reported that the mouse gut microbiome contributes to pulmonary responses to ozone, a common asthma trigger, and that short-chain fatty acids, end products of bacterial fermentation, likely contribute to this role of the microbiome. A growing body of evidence indicates that there are sex-related differences in gut microbiota and these differences can have important functional consequences. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are sex-related differences in the impact of the gut microbiota on pulmonary responses to ozone. After acute exposure to ozone, male mice developed greater airway hyperresponsiveness than female mice. This difference was abolished after antibiotic ablation of the gut microbiome. Moreover, weanling female pups housed in cages conditioned by adult male mice developed greater ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness than weanling female pups raised in cages conditioned by adult females. Finally, ad libitum oral administration via drinking water of the short-chain fatty acid propionate resulted in augmented ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in male, but not female, mice. Overall, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that the microbiome contributes to sex differences in ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, likely as a result of sex differences in the response to short-chain fatty acids.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Department of Environmental Health and.2 Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.1 Department of Environmental Health and.1 Department of Environmental Health and.1 Department of Environmental Health and.1 Department of Environmental Health and.2 Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.1 Department of Environmental Health and.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30240285

Citation

Cho, Youngji, et al. "Sex Differences in Pulmonary Responses to Ozone in Mice. Role of the Microbiome." American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, vol. 60, no. 2, 2019, pp. 198-208.
Cho Y, Abu-Ali G, Tashiro H, et al. Sex Differences in Pulmonary Responses to Ozone in Mice. Role of the Microbiome. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2019;60(2):198-208.
Cho, Y., Abu-Ali, G., Tashiro, H., Brown, T. A., Osgood, R. S., Kasahara, D. I., ... Shore, S. A. (2019). Sex Differences in Pulmonary Responses to Ozone in Mice. Role of the Microbiome. American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, 60(2), pp. 198-208. doi:10.1165/rcmb.2018-0099OC.
Cho Y, et al. Sex Differences in Pulmonary Responses to Ozone in Mice. Role of the Microbiome. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2019;60(2):198-208. PubMed PMID: 30240285.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sex Differences in Pulmonary Responses to Ozone in Mice. Role of the Microbiome. AU - Cho,Youngji, AU - Abu-Ali,Galeb, AU - Tashiro,Hiroki, AU - Brown,Traci A, AU - Osgood,Ross S, AU - Kasahara,David I, AU - Huttenhower,Curtis, AU - Shore,Stephanie A, PY - 2020/02/01/pmc-release PY - 2018/9/22/pubmed PY - 2018/9/22/medline PY - 2018/9/22/entrez KW - 16S rRNA gene sequencing KW - airway responsiveness KW - antibiotics KW - neutrophil KW - short-chain fatty acids SP - 198 EP - 208 JF - American journal of respiratory cell and molecular biology JO - Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. VL - 60 IS - 2 N2 - We have previously reported that the mouse gut microbiome contributes to pulmonary responses to ozone, a common asthma trigger, and that short-chain fatty acids, end products of bacterial fermentation, likely contribute to this role of the microbiome. A growing body of evidence indicates that there are sex-related differences in gut microbiota and these differences can have important functional consequences. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are sex-related differences in the impact of the gut microbiota on pulmonary responses to ozone. After acute exposure to ozone, male mice developed greater airway hyperresponsiveness than female mice. This difference was abolished after antibiotic ablation of the gut microbiome. Moreover, weanling female pups housed in cages conditioned by adult male mice developed greater ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness than weanling female pups raised in cages conditioned by adult females. Finally, ad libitum oral administration via drinking water of the short-chain fatty acid propionate resulted in augmented ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in male, but not female, mice. Overall, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that the microbiome contributes to sex differences in ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, likely as a result of sex differences in the response to short-chain fatty acids. SN - 1535-4989 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30240285/Sex_Differences_in_Pulmonary_Responses_to_Ozone_in_Mice__Role_of_the_Microbiome_ L2 - http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/full/10.1165/rcmb.2018-0099OC?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -