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Behavioral and cognitive effects of docosahexaenoic acid in drug-naïve children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2019 Apr; 28(4):571-583.EC

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) dietary supplementation on behavior and cognition in school-aged, drug-naïve children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A total of 50 participants with ADHD aged 7 to 14 were enrolled in a 6-month randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial and received either DHA or placebo. The primary outcome measure was the change in the ADHD rating scale IV Parent Version-Investigator (ADHD-RS-IV) after 4 and 6 months. Secondary outcome measures included Conners Parent Rating Scale-revised, other behavioral rating scales including quality of life and global functioning, and computerized cognitive tasks. Baseline assessment also addressed the blood fatty acids profile. No superiority of DHA supplement to placebo was observed on ADHD-RS-IV, the a priori primary outcome. DHA supplementation showed a significant, nonetheless quite small, effect on children's psychosocial functioning, emotional problems, and focused attention. Neither major nor minor adverse events were reported throughout the trial. This study shows that 6-month DHA supplementation has no beneficial effect on the symptoms of ADHD in school-aged, drug-naïve children with an established diagnosis of ADHD. Nevertheless, the 6 months treatment with supplemental DHA appears to have small positive effects on other behavioral and cognitive difficulties, which, in light of the absence of side-effects, could be reasonably followed up in future intervention studies. (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01796262 : The Effects of DHA on Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (DADA)).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Scientific Institute, IRCCS E. Medea, Child Psychopathology Unit, Bosisio Parini, Lecco, Italy. alessandro.crippa@lanostrafamiglia.it.Scientific Institute, IRCCS E. Medea, Child Psychopathology Unit, Bosisio Parini, Lecco, Italy.Scientific Institute, IRCCS E. Medea, Child Psychopathology Unit, Bosisio Parini, Lecco, Italy.Scientific Institute, IRCCS E. Medea, Child Psychopathology Unit, Bosisio Parini, Lecco, Italy.Scientific Institute, IRCCS E. Medea, Child Psychopathology Unit, Bosisio Parini, Lecco, Italy.Scientific Institute, IRCCS E. Medea, Child Psychopathology Unit, Bosisio Parini, Lecco, Italy. Department of Psychology, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy.Pediatric Intermediate Care Unit, DISSCO Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Fondazione IRCCS Ca Granda-Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.Scientific Institute, IRCCS E. Medea, Child Psychopathology Unit, Bosisio Parini, Lecco, Italy.Scientific Institute, IRCCS E. Medea, Child Psychopathology Unit, Bosisio Parini, Lecco, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30246216

Citation

Crippa, Alessandro, et al. "Behavioral and Cognitive Effects of Docosahexaenoic Acid in Drug-naïve Children With Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder: a Randomized, Placebo-controlled Clinical Trial." European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, vol. 28, no. 4, 2019, pp. 571-583.
Crippa A, Tesei A, Sangiorgio F, et al. Behavioral and cognitive effects of docosahexaenoic acid in drug-naïve children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2019;28(4):571-583.
Crippa, A., Tesei, A., Sangiorgio, F., Salandi, A., Trabattoni, S., Grazioli, S., Agostoni, C., Molteni, M., & Nobile, M. (2019). Behavioral and cognitive effects of docosahexaenoic acid in drug-naïve children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 28(4), 571-583. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00787-018-1223-z
Crippa A, et al. Behavioral and Cognitive Effects of Docosahexaenoic Acid in Drug-naïve Children With Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder: a Randomized, Placebo-controlled Clinical Trial. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2019;28(4):571-583. PubMed PMID: 30246216.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Behavioral and cognitive effects of docosahexaenoic acid in drug-naïve children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. AU - Crippa,Alessandro, AU - Tesei,Alessandra, AU - Sangiorgio,Federica, AU - Salandi,Antonio, AU - Trabattoni,Sara, AU - Grazioli,Silvia, AU - Agostoni,Carlo, AU - Molteni,Massimo, AU - Nobile,Maria, Y1 - 2018/09/24/ PY - 2017/12/12/received PY - 2018/09/06/accepted PY - 2018/9/25/pubmed PY - 2019/5/24/medline PY - 2018/9/25/entrez KW - Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) KW - Behavior KW - Cognition KW - Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) KW - Fatty acids SP - 571 EP - 583 JF - European child & adolescent psychiatry JO - Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry VL - 28 IS - 4 N2 - This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) dietary supplementation on behavior and cognition in school-aged, drug-naïve children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A total of 50 participants with ADHD aged 7 to 14 were enrolled in a 6-month randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial and received either DHA or placebo. The primary outcome measure was the change in the ADHD rating scale IV Parent Version-Investigator (ADHD-RS-IV) after 4 and 6 months. Secondary outcome measures included Conners Parent Rating Scale-revised, other behavioral rating scales including quality of life and global functioning, and computerized cognitive tasks. Baseline assessment also addressed the blood fatty acids profile. No superiority of DHA supplement to placebo was observed on ADHD-RS-IV, the a priori primary outcome. DHA supplementation showed a significant, nonetheless quite small, effect on children's psychosocial functioning, emotional problems, and focused attention. Neither major nor minor adverse events were reported throughout the trial. This study shows that 6-month DHA supplementation has no beneficial effect on the symptoms of ADHD in school-aged, drug-naïve children with an established diagnosis of ADHD. Nevertheless, the 6 months treatment with supplemental DHA appears to have small positive effects on other behavioral and cognitive difficulties, which, in light of the absence of side-effects, could be reasonably followed up in future intervention studies. (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01796262 : The Effects of DHA on Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (DADA)). SN - 1435-165X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30246216/Behavioral_and_cognitive_effects_of_docosahexaenoic_acid_in_drug_naïve_children_with_attention_deficit/hyperactivity_disorder:_a_randomized_placebo_controlled_clinical_trial_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-018-1223-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -