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Parasitic Myomas: An Unusual Risk after Morcellation.
Gynecol Minim Invasive Ther. 2018 Jul-Sep; 7(3):124-126.GM

Abstract

A 24-year-old unmarried woman had undergone laparoscopic myomectomy for single degenerated myoma of size 15 cm. Uncontained morcellation of the myoma was done with an electromechanical morcellator. Two years later, she presented with abdominal pain, and laparoscopy revealed enlarged uterus (20 weeks) with multiple degenerated myomas. There were multiple parasitic myomas measuring 1-3 cm in the pelvis and anterior abdominal wall which were removed laparoscopically. Histopathology of all the myomas including parasitic myomas confirmed the diagnosis of leiomyoma. The formation of parasitic myomas was assumed to be due to the myomatous fragments which were left behind during morcellation at the time of initial myomectomy. Methods to prevent this complication are colpotomy, mini-laparotomy, or in-bag morcellation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Advanced Endoscopy and Infertility Treatment, Paul's Hospital, Kochi, Kerala, India.Centre for Advanced Endoscopy and Infertility Treatment, Paul's Hospital, Kochi, Kerala, India.Centre for Advanced Endoscopy and Infertility Treatment, Paul's Hospital, Kochi, Kerala, India.Centre for Advanced Endoscopy and Infertility Treatment, Paul's Hospital, Kochi, Kerala, India.Centre for Advanced Endoscopy and Infertility Treatment, Paul's Hospital, Kochi, Kerala, India.Centre for Advanced Endoscopy and Infertility Treatment, Paul's Hospital, Kochi, Kerala, India.

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30254954

Citation

Paul, P G., et al. "Parasitic Myomas: an Unusual Risk After Morcellation." Gynecology and Minimally Invasive Therapy, vol. 7, no. 3, 2018, pp. 124-126.
Paul PG, Shintre H, Mehta S, et al. Parasitic Myomas: An Unusual Risk after Morcellation. Gynecology and minimally invasive therapy. 2018;7(3):124-126.
Paul, P. G., Shintre, H., Mehta, S., Gulati, G., Paul, G., & Mannur, S. (2018). Parasitic Myomas: An Unusual Risk after Morcellation. Gynecology and Minimally Invasive Therapy, 7(3), 124-126. https://doi.org/10.4103/GMIT.GMIT_36_18
Paul PG, et al. Parasitic Myomas: an Unusual Risk After Morcellation. Gynecology and minimally invasive therapy. 2018 Jul-Sep;7(3):124-126. PubMed PMID: 30254954.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Parasitic Myomas: An Unusual Risk after Morcellation. AU - Paul,P G, AU - Shintre,Hemant, AU - Mehta,Santwan, AU - Gulati,Gunjan, AU - Paul,George, AU - Mannur,Sumina, Y1 - 2018/08/23/ PY - 2018/9/27/entrez PY - 2018/9/27/pubmed PY - 2018/9/27/medline KW - Laparoscopic myomectomy KW - parasitic myoma KW - uncontained tissue morcellation SP - 124 EP - 126 JF - Gynecology and minimally invasive therapy VL - 7 IS - 3 N2 - A 24-year-old unmarried woman had undergone laparoscopic myomectomy for single degenerated myoma of size 15 cm. Uncontained morcellation of the myoma was done with an electromechanical morcellator. Two years later, she presented with abdominal pain, and laparoscopy revealed enlarged uterus (20 weeks) with multiple degenerated myomas. There were multiple parasitic myomas measuring 1-3 cm in the pelvis and anterior abdominal wall which were removed laparoscopically. Histopathology of all the myomas including parasitic myomas confirmed the diagnosis of leiomyoma. The formation of parasitic myomas was assumed to be due to the myomatous fragments which were left behind during morcellation at the time of initial myomectomy. Methods to prevent this complication are colpotomy, mini-laparotomy, or in-bag morcellation. SN - 2213-3070 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30254954/Parasitic_Myomas:_An_Unusual_Risk_after_Morcellation_ L2 - http://www.e-gmit.com/article.asp?issn=2213-3070;year=2018;volume=7;issue=3;spage=124;epage=126;aulast=Paul DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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