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Outlet Type, Access to Alcohol, and Violent Crime.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2018 11; 42(11):2234-2245.AC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

While there are overwhelming data supporting the association between alcohol outlet density and violent crime, there remain conflicting findings about whether on- or off-premise outlets have a stronger association. This inconsistency may be in part a result of the methods used to calculate alcohol outlet density and violent crime. This analysis uses routine activity theory and spatial access methods to study the association between access to alcohol outlets and violent crime, including type of outlet and type of crime in Baltimore, MD.

METHODS

The data in this analysis include alcohol outlets from 2016 (n = 1,204), violent crimes from 2012 to 2016 (n = 51,006), and markers of social disorganization, including owner-occupied housing, median annual household income, drug arrests, and population density. The analysis used linear regression to determine the association between access to alcohol outlets and violent crime exposure.

RESULTS

Each 10% increase in alcohol outlet access was associated with a 4.2% increase in violent crime exposure (β = 0.43, 95% CI 0.33, 0.52, p < 0.001). A 10% increase in access to off-premise outlets (4.4%, β = 0.45, 95% CI 0.33, 0.57, p < 0.001) and LBD-7 outlets (combined off- and on-premise outlets; 4.2%, β = 0.43, 95% CI 0.33, 0.52, p < 0.001) had a greater association with violent crime than on-premise outlets (3.0%, β = 0.31, 95% CI 0.20, 0.41, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Access to outlets that allow for off-site consumption had a greater association with violent crime than outlets that only permit on-site consumption. The lack of effective measures to keep order in and around off-premise outlets could attract or multiply violent crime.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Alcohol Research Group , Emeryville, California. Department of Health Law, Policy and Management , Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Epidemiology , Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.Department of Health, Policy and Management , Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.Johns Hopkins School of Medicine , Baltimore, Maryland.Department of Health, Behavior and Society , Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.Department of Health, Behavior and Society , Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.Department of Health Law, Policy and Management , Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30256427

Citation

Trangenstein, Pamela J., et al. "Outlet Type, Access to Alcohol, and Violent Crime." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 42, no. 11, 2018, pp. 2234-2245.
Trangenstein PJ, Curriero FC, Webster D, et al. Outlet Type, Access to Alcohol, and Violent Crime. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2018;42(11):2234-2245.
Trangenstein, P. J., Curriero, F. C., Webster, D., Jennings, J. M., Latkin, C., Eck, R., & Jernigan, D. H. (2018). Outlet Type, Access to Alcohol, and Violent Crime. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 42(11), 2234-2245. https://doi.org/10.1111/acer.13880
Trangenstein PJ, et al. Outlet Type, Access to Alcohol, and Violent Crime. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2018;42(11):2234-2245. PubMed PMID: 30256427.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Outlet Type, Access to Alcohol, and Violent Crime. AU - Trangenstein,Pamela J, AU - Curriero,Frank C, AU - Webster,Daniel, AU - Jennings,Jacky M, AU - Latkin,Carl, AU - Eck,Raimee, AU - Jernigan,David H, Y1 - 2018/09/26/ PY - 2018/04/30/received PY - 2018/08/22/accepted PY - 2018/9/27/pubmed PY - 2019/11/7/medline PY - 2018/9/27/entrez KW - Alcohol Outlet Density KW - Spatial Access KW - Violent Crime SP - 2234 EP - 2245 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. VL - 42 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: While there are overwhelming data supporting the association between alcohol outlet density and violent crime, there remain conflicting findings about whether on- or off-premise outlets have a stronger association. This inconsistency may be in part a result of the methods used to calculate alcohol outlet density and violent crime. This analysis uses routine activity theory and spatial access methods to study the association between access to alcohol outlets and violent crime, including type of outlet and type of crime in Baltimore, MD. METHODS: The data in this analysis include alcohol outlets from 2016 (n = 1,204), violent crimes from 2012 to 2016 (n = 51,006), and markers of social disorganization, including owner-occupied housing, median annual household income, drug arrests, and population density. The analysis used linear regression to determine the association between access to alcohol outlets and violent crime exposure. RESULTS: Each 10% increase in alcohol outlet access was associated with a 4.2% increase in violent crime exposure (β = 0.43, 95% CI 0.33, 0.52, p < 0.001). A 10% increase in access to off-premise outlets (4.4%, β = 0.45, 95% CI 0.33, 0.57, p < 0.001) and LBD-7 outlets (combined off- and on-premise outlets; 4.2%, β = 0.43, 95% CI 0.33, 0.52, p < 0.001) had a greater association with violent crime than on-premise outlets (3.0%, β = 0.31, 95% CI 0.20, 0.41, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Access to outlets that allow for off-site consumption had a greater association with violent crime than outlets that only permit on-site consumption. The lack of effective measures to keep order in and around off-premise outlets could attract or multiply violent crime. SN - 1530-0277 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30256427/Outlet_Type,_Access_to_Alcohol,_and_Violent_Crime L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/acer.13880 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -