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Social support factors associated with psychological resilience among women survivors of intimate partner violence in Gauteng, South Africa.
Glob Health Action. 2018; 11(sup3):1491114.GH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Women's experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) increase their risk for mental ill health. However, some women exposed to IPV and adversity are psychologically resilient and function well despite these exposures.

OBJECTIVES

We conducted a study to investigate the factors that are associated with psychological resilience among abused women, using data collected in a household survey conducted in Gauteng province of South Africa.

METHODS

Data is from a cross-sectional study. A multi-stage random sampling approach was used to select a sample of 501 women. The World Health Organization (WHO) Multi-Country Study on Women's Health and Domestic Violence Questionnaire was used to measure lifetime experience of physical and sexual IPV. Only 189 women who had experienced lifetime IPV were included in this secondary analysis. Resilience was measured as scoring below the threshold for the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale and the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire. Other explanatory factors measured included child sexual abuse, non-partner rape, other traumatic life events, social support indicators, binge drinking and socio-demographic variables. Multivariable regression analysis was used to test factors associated with resilience.

RESULTS

Forty two percent of women scored below the threshold for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or depressive symptoms at the time of the survey and so were categorized as resilient. Social support indicators were associated with increased resilience. Women who perceived that their communities were supportive and they would easily find money in an emergency were more likely to be resilient. Women who binge drank, experienced severe IPV in the past 12 months, received negative reactions to disclosure and utilized medical or psychosocial services were less likely to be resilient.

CONCLUSION

Social support indicators including social connectedness, stronger network ties and perceived supportive communities are key factors in fostering resilience among abused women. Interventions should aim to promote stronger and supportive social networks and increase women's utilization of formal support services.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Gender and Health Research Unit , South African Medical Research Council , Pretoria , South Africa. b School of Public Health , University of Witwatersrand , Johannesburg , South Africa.b School of Public Health , University of Witwatersrand , Johannesburg , South Africa.a Gender and Health Research Unit , South African Medical Research Council , Pretoria , South Africa. b School of Public Health , University of Witwatersrand , Johannesburg , South Africa.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30270774

Citation

Machisa, Mercilene T., et al. "Social Support Factors Associated With Psychological Resilience Among Women Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence in Gauteng, South Africa." Global Health Action, vol. 11, no. sup3, 2018, p. 1491114.
Machisa MT, Christofides N, Jewkes R. Social support factors associated with psychological resilience among women survivors of intimate partner violence in Gauteng, South Africa. Glob Health Action. 2018;11(sup3):1491114.
Machisa, M. T., Christofides, N., & Jewkes, R. (2018). Social support factors associated with psychological resilience among women survivors of intimate partner violence in Gauteng, South Africa. Global Health Action, 11(sup3), 1491114. https://doi.org/10.1080/16549716.2018.1491114
Machisa MT, Christofides N, Jewkes R. Social Support Factors Associated With Psychological Resilience Among Women Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence in Gauteng, South Africa. Glob Health Action. 2018;11(sup3):1491114. PubMed PMID: 30270774.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Social support factors associated with psychological resilience among women survivors of intimate partner violence in Gauteng, South Africa. AU - Machisa,Mercilene T, AU - Christofides,Nicola, AU - Jewkes,Rachel, PY - 2018/10/2/entrez PY - 2018/10/3/pubmed PY - 2019/7/10/medline KW - Resilience KW - intimate partner violence KW - mental health; PTSD; depression; trauma KW - social support SP - 1491114 EP - 1491114 JF - Global health action JO - Glob Health Action VL - 11 IS - sup3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Women's experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) increase their risk for mental ill health. However, some women exposed to IPV and adversity are psychologically resilient and function well despite these exposures. OBJECTIVES: We conducted a study to investigate the factors that are associated with psychological resilience among abused women, using data collected in a household survey conducted in Gauteng province of South Africa. METHODS: Data is from a cross-sectional study. A multi-stage random sampling approach was used to select a sample of 501 women. The World Health Organization (WHO) Multi-Country Study on Women's Health and Domestic Violence Questionnaire was used to measure lifetime experience of physical and sexual IPV. Only 189 women who had experienced lifetime IPV were included in this secondary analysis. Resilience was measured as scoring below the threshold for the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale and the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire. Other explanatory factors measured included child sexual abuse, non-partner rape, other traumatic life events, social support indicators, binge drinking and socio-demographic variables. Multivariable regression analysis was used to test factors associated with resilience. RESULTS: Forty two percent of women scored below the threshold for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or depressive symptoms at the time of the survey and so were categorized as resilient. Social support indicators were associated with increased resilience. Women who perceived that their communities were supportive and they would easily find money in an emergency were more likely to be resilient. Women who binge drank, experienced severe IPV in the past 12 months, received negative reactions to disclosure and utilized medical or psychosocial services were less likely to be resilient. CONCLUSION: Social support indicators including social connectedness, stronger network ties and perceived supportive communities are key factors in fostering resilience among abused women. Interventions should aim to promote stronger and supportive social networks and increase women's utilization of formal support services. SN - 1654-9880 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30270774/Social_support_factors_associated_with_psychological_resilience_among_women_survivors_of_intimate_partner_violence_in_Gauteng_South_Africa_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/16549716.2018.1491114 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -