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Neural correlates of facial emotion processing in infancy.
Dev Sci. 2019 05; 22(3):e12758.DS

Abstract

In the present study we examined the neural correlates of facial emotion processing in the first year of life using ERP measures and cortical source analysis. EEG data were collected cross-sectionally from 5- (N = 49), 7- (N = 50), and 12-month-old (N = 51) infants while they were viewing images of angry, fearful, and happy faces. The N290 component was found to be larger in amplitude in response to fearful and happy than angry faces in all posterior clusters and showed largest response to fear than the other two emotions only over the right occipital area. The P400 and Nc components were found to be larger in amplitude in response to angry than happy and fearful faces over central and frontal scalp. Cortical source analysis of the N290 component revealed greater cortical activation in the right fusiform face area in response to fearful faces. This effect started to emerge at 5 months and became well established at 7 months, but it disappeared at 12 months. The P400 and Nc components were primarily localized to the PCC/Precuneus where heightened responses to angry faces were observed. The current results suggest the detection of a fearful face in infants' brain can happen shortly (~200-290 ms) after the stimulus onset, and this process may rely on the face network and develop substantially between 5 to 7 months of age. The current findings also suggest the differential processing of angry faces occurred later in the P400/Nc time window, which recruits the PCC/Precuneus and is associated with the allocation of infants' attention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratories of Cognitive Neuroscience, Division of Developmental Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts.Laboratories of Cognitive Neuroscience, Division of Developmental Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Psychology, University of California, Davis, California.Laboratories of Cognitive Neuroscience, Division of Developmental Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Harvard Graduate School of Education, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30276933

Citation

Xie, Wanze, et al. "Neural Correlates of Facial Emotion Processing in Infancy." Developmental Science, vol. 22, no. 3, 2019, pp. e12758.
Xie W, McCormick SA, Westerlund A, et al. Neural correlates of facial emotion processing in infancy. Dev Sci. 2019;22(3):e12758.
Xie, W., McCormick, S. A., Westerlund, A., Bowman, L. C., & Nelson, C. A. (2019). Neural correlates of facial emotion processing in infancy. Developmental Science, 22(3), e12758. https://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12758
Xie W, et al. Neural Correlates of Facial Emotion Processing in Infancy. Dev Sci. 2019;22(3):e12758. PubMed PMID: 30276933.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neural correlates of facial emotion processing in infancy. AU - Xie,Wanze, AU - McCormick,Sarah A, AU - Westerlund,Alissa, AU - Bowman,Lindsay C, AU - Nelson,Charles A, Y1 - 2018/10/16/ PY - 2018/05/17/received PY - 2018/09/20/revised PY - 2018/09/21/accepted PY - 2018/10/3/pubmed PY - 2019/10/28/medline PY - 2018/10/3/entrez KW - ERPs KW - cortical source analysis KW - infant facial emotion processing SP - e12758 EP - e12758 JF - Developmental science JO - Dev Sci VL - 22 IS - 3 N2 - In the present study we examined the neural correlates of facial emotion processing in the first year of life using ERP measures and cortical source analysis. EEG data were collected cross-sectionally from 5- (N = 49), 7- (N = 50), and 12-month-old (N = 51) infants while they were viewing images of angry, fearful, and happy faces. The N290 component was found to be larger in amplitude in response to fearful and happy than angry faces in all posterior clusters and showed largest response to fear than the other two emotions only over the right occipital area. The P400 and Nc components were found to be larger in amplitude in response to angry than happy and fearful faces over central and frontal scalp. Cortical source analysis of the N290 component revealed greater cortical activation in the right fusiform face area in response to fearful faces. This effect started to emerge at 5 months and became well established at 7 months, but it disappeared at 12 months. The P400 and Nc components were primarily localized to the PCC/Precuneus where heightened responses to angry faces were observed. The current results suggest the detection of a fearful face in infants' brain can happen shortly (~200-290 ms) after the stimulus onset, and this process may rely on the face network and develop substantially between 5 to 7 months of age. The current findings also suggest the differential processing of angry faces occurred later in the P400/Nc time window, which recruits the PCC/Precuneus and is associated with the allocation of infants' attention. SN - 1467-7687 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30276933/Neural_correlates_of_facial_emotion_processing_in_infancy_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12758 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -