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Consumption of sugar sweetened beverages and dietary fructose in relation to risk of gout and hyperuricemia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2020; 60(1):1-10.CR

Abstract

Background:

Findings on the association of sugar sweetened beverages (SSB) and fructose intakes with gout and hyperuricemia have been conflicting.

Objective:

We aimed to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on studies that examined the association of SSB and fructose consumption with gout and hyperuricemia in adults.

Methods:

We searched PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar up to Aug 2017 for all relevant published papers assessing SSB and fructose intakes and risk of gout and hyperuricemia. After excluding non-relevant papers, 10 studies remained in our systematic. Meta-analysis on SSB consumption and risk of gout was done on three effect sizes from cohort studies and five effect sizes from case-control studies. For risk of hyperuricemia, the meta-analysis was done on six effect sizes from cross-sectional studies. All analyses were performed on ORs or RRs.

Results:

We found an overall significant positive association between SSB consumption and risk of gout in both cohort (summary effect size: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.18-1.55) and case-control studies (summary effect size: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.06-1.66). Meta-analysis on cross-sectional studies revealed that SSB consumption was associated with 35% greater odds of hyperuricemia (summary effect size: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.19-1.52). No evidence of between-study heterogeneity as well as publication bias was found. Although the studies on fructose intake and risk of gout and hyperuricemia were included in our systematic review, we did not perform met-analysis on these studies due to insufficient number of publications.

Conclusion:

We found that SSB consumption was significantly associated with increased risk of gout and hyperuricemia in adult population. Further studies are needed to examine the association between dietary fructose intake and risk of gout and hyepruricemia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. Obesity and Eating Habits Research Center Endocrinology and Metabolism Molecular-Cellular Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30277800

Citation

Ebrahimpour-Koujan, Soraiya, et al. "Consumption of Sugar Sweetened Beverages and Dietary Fructose in Relation to Risk of Gout and Hyperuricemia: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis." Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, vol. 60, no. 1, 2020, pp. 1-10.
Ebrahimpour-Koujan S, Saneei P, Larijani B, et al. Consumption of sugar sweetened beverages and dietary fructose in relation to risk of gout and hyperuricemia: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2020;60(1):1-10.
Ebrahimpour-Koujan, S., Saneei, P., Larijani, B., & Esmaillzadeh, A. (2020). Consumption of sugar sweetened beverages and dietary fructose in relation to risk of gout and hyperuricemia: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 60(1), 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1080/10408398.2018.1503155
Ebrahimpour-Koujan S, et al. Consumption of Sugar Sweetened Beverages and Dietary Fructose in Relation to Risk of Gout and Hyperuricemia: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2020;60(1):1-10. PubMed PMID: 30277800.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Consumption of sugar sweetened beverages and dietary fructose in relation to risk of gout and hyperuricemia: a systematic review and meta-analysis. AU - Ebrahimpour-Koujan,Soraiya, AU - Saneei,Parvane, AU - Larijani,Bagher, AU - Esmaillzadeh,Ahmad, Y1 - 2018/10/02/ PY - 2018/10/3/pubmed PY - 2020/2/25/medline PY - 2018/10/3/entrez KW - Sugar sweetened beverages KW - fructose KW - gout KW - hyperuricemia KW - uric acid SP - 1 EP - 10 JF - Critical reviews in food science and nutrition JO - Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr VL - 60 IS - 1 N2 - Background: Findings on the association of sugar sweetened beverages (SSB) and fructose intakes with gout and hyperuricemia have been conflicting.Objective: We aimed to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on studies that examined the association of SSB and fructose consumption with gout and hyperuricemia in adults.Methods: We searched PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar up to Aug 2017 for all relevant published papers assessing SSB and fructose intakes and risk of gout and hyperuricemia. After excluding non-relevant papers, 10 studies remained in our systematic. Meta-analysis on SSB consumption and risk of gout was done on three effect sizes from cohort studies and five effect sizes from case-control studies. For risk of hyperuricemia, the meta-analysis was done on six effect sizes from cross-sectional studies. All analyses were performed on ORs or RRs.Results: We found an overall significant positive association between SSB consumption and risk of gout in both cohort (summary effect size: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.18-1.55) and case-control studies (summary effect size: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.06-1.66). Meta-analysis on cross-sectional studies revealed that SSB consumption was associated with 35% greater odds of hyperuricemia (summary effect size: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.19-1.52). No evidence of between-study heterogeneity as well as publication bias was found. Although the studies on fructose intake and risk of gout and hyperuricemia were included in our systematic review, we did not perform met-analysis on these studies due to insufficient number of publications.Conclusion: We found that SSB consumption was significantly associated with increased risk of gout and hyperuricemia in adult population. Further studies are needed to examine the association between dietary fructose intake and risk of gout and hyepruricemia. SN - 1549-7852 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30277800/Consumption_of_sugar_sweetened_beverages_and_dietary_fructose_in_relation_to_risk_of_gout_and_hyperuricemia:_a_systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10408398.2018.1503155 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -