Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

What Accounts for Prosocial Behavior? Roles of Moral Identity, Moral Judgment, and Self-Efficacy Beliefs.
J Genet Psychol. 2018 Sep-Oct; 179(5):231-245.JG

Abstract

Prior research suggests that moral identity influences individuals' willingness to engage in prosocial behavior. Little attention, however, has been given to the roles of and relations between moral identity and other factors, such as moral judgment, in accounting for types of prosocial behavior in adolescence. The current study examined the extent to which moral identity, moral judgment, and social self-efficacy contribute to prosocial behaviors in adolescence. Approximately 338 adolescents (Mage = 13.4 years) completed measures of moral identity, moral judgment, social self-efficacy, and prosocial behavior. Teachers rated adolescents' prosocial behaviors, which largely corroborated the adolescents' self-reports. Moral identity was found to predict most types of prosocial behavior. Moral judgment and moral identity were related and jointly predicted altruistic prosocial behaviors, but did not predict helping in front of others. Further, moral identity mediated the relationships between moral judgment and some forms of prosocial behavior (e.g., emotional, volunteering). Self-efficacy beliefs were found to predict some types of prosocial behavior (e.g., public), perhaps providing adolescents with confidence to engage in prosocial action. Overall, moral identity was especially effective in directly accounting for prosocial behavior, and may act as a mediator to bridge the moral judgment-moral action gap among adolescents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Department of Psychology , University of Tampa , Tampa , Florida , USA.b Department of Psychology , Ohio State University , Columbus , Ohio , USA.b Department of Psychology , Ohio State University , Columbus , Ohio , USA.c Department of Communications and Behavioral Sciences , Urbana University , Urbana , Ohio , USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30280983

Citation

Patrick, Renee B., et al. "What Accounts for Prosocial Behavior? Roles of Moral Identity, Moral Judgment, and Self-Efficacy Beliefs." The Journal of Genetic Psychology, vol. 179, no. 5, 2018, pp. 231-245.
Patrick RB, Bodine AJ, Gibbs JC, et al. What Accounts for Prosocial Behavior? Roles of Moral Identity, Moral Judgment, and Self-Efficacy Beliefs. J Genet Psychol. 2018;179(5):231-245.
Patrick, R. B., Bodine, A. J., Gibbs, J. C., & Basinger, K. S. (2018). What Accounts for Prosocial Behavior? Roles of Moral Identity, Moral Judgment, and Self-Efficacy Beliefs. The Journal of Genetic Psychology, 179(5), 231-245. https://doi.org/10.1080/00221325.2018.1491472
Patrick RB, et al. What Accounts for Prosocial Behavior? Roles of Moral Identity, Moral Judgment, and Self-Efficacy Beliefs. J Genet Psychol. 2018 Sep-Oct;179(5):231-245. PubMed PMID: 30280983.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - What Accounts for Prosocial Behavior? Roles of Moral Identity, Moral Judgment, and Self-Efficacy Beliefs. AU - Patrick,Renee B, AU - Bodine,Andrew J, AU - Gibbs,John C, AU - Basinger,Karen S, Y1 - 2018/10/03/ PY - 2018/10/4/pubmed PY - 2019/10/15/medline PY - 2018/10/4/entrez KW - Moral identity KW - moral judgment KW - prosocial behavior KW - self-efficacy SP - 231 EP - 245 JF - The Journal of genetic psychology JO - J Genet Psychol VL - 179 IS - 5 N2 - Prior research suggests that moral identity influences individuals' willingness to engage in prosocial behavior. Little attention, however, has been given to the roles of and relations between moral identity and other factors, such as moral judgment, in accounting for types of prosocial behavior in adolescence. The current study examined the extent to which moral identity, moral judgment, and social self-efficacy contribute to prosocial behaviors in adolescence. Approximately 338 adolescents (Mage = 13.4 years) completed measures of moral identity, moral judgment, social self-efficacy, and prosocial behavior. Teachers rated adolescents' prosocial behaviors, which largely corroborated the adolescents' self-reports. Moral identity was found to predict most types of prosocial behavior. Moral judgment and moral identity were related and jointly predicted altruistic prosocial behaviors, but did not predict helping in front of others. Further, moral identity mediated the relationships between moral judgment and some forms of prosocial behavior (e.g., emotional, volunteering). Self-efficacy beliefs were found to predict some types of prosocial behavior (e.g., public), perhaps providing adolescents with confidence to engage in prosocial action. Overall, moral identity was especially effective in directly accounting for prosocial behavior, and may act as a mediator to bridge the moral judgment-moral action gap among adolescents. SN - 1940-0896 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30280983/What_Accounts_for_Prosocial_Behavior_Roles_of_Moral_Identity_Moral_Judgment_and_Self_Efficacy_Beliefs_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00221325.2018.1491472 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -