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Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation and racial/ethnic disparities in food and beverage purchases.
Public Health Nutr. 2018 12; 21(18):3377-3385.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The current study aimed to (i) describe racial/ethnic disparities in household food and beverage purchases among participants and non-participants in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and (ii) examine longitudinal associations between SNAP participation and purchases by race/ethnicity.

DESIGN

To describe disparities, we estimated sociodemographic-adjusted mean purchases of seven unhealthy food and beverage groups (e.g. junk food, sugar-sweetened beverages) and four nutrients (e.g. sugar, Na) among white, black and Hispanic SNAP-participating and non-participating households. To examine longitudinal associations, we used multivariable linear regression with household fixed effects.

SETTING

USA, 2010-2014.

SUBJECTS

Food and beverage purchases among low-income (≤250 % federal poverty line) US households (n 30 403) participating in the Nielsen Homescan Panel.

RESULTS

Among non-participants, there were significant black-white disparities (i.e. differences favouring white households) in households' adjusted mean purchases of processed meat, sweeteners, sugar-sweetened beverages, energy and Na. These disparities persisted among SNAP participants. In contrast, the only significant Hispanic-white disparity among non-participants was for Na purchases; this disparity was reduced in magnitude and no longer significant among SNAP-participating households. Additionally, Hispanic households purchased less energy from junk foods than white households, regardless of SNAP status. In longitudinal models accounting for household fixed effects, SNAP participation was associated with increased energy purchased among black households. No other significant longitudinal associations between SNAP and purchase outcomes were observed.

CONCLUSIONS

SNAP may not be meeting its potential to improve food and beverage purchases or reduce disparities. Research is needed to identify strategies for ensuring nutritious purchases across all racial/ethnic groups.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Department of Health Behavior,Gillings School of Global Public Health,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,135 Dauer Drive,302 Rosenau Hall,CB#7440,Chapel Hill,NC27599,USA.2Carolina Population Center,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,Chapel Hill,NC,USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30305190

Citation

Grummon, Anna H., and Lindsey Smith Taillie. "Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participation and Racial/ethnic Disparities in Food and Beverage Purchases." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 21, no. 18, 2018, pp. 3377-3385.
Grummon AH, Taillie LS. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation and racial/ethnic disparities in food and beverage purchases. Public Health Nutr. 2018;21(18):3377-3385.
Grummon, A. H., & Taillie, L. S. (2018). Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation and racial/ethnic disparities in food and beverage purchases. Public Health Nutrition, 21(18), 3377-3385. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980018002598
Grummon AH, Taillie LS. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participation and Racial/ethnic Disparities in Food and Beverage Purchases. Public Health Nutr. 2018;21(18):3377-3385. PubMed PMID: 30305190.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation and racial/ethnic disparities in food and beverage purchases. AU - Grummon,Anna H, AU - Taillie,Lindsey Smith, Y1 - 2018/10/11/ PY - 2018/10/12/pubmed PY - 2019/10/11/medline PY - 2018/10/12/entrez KW - Food purchases KW - Food stamps KW - Low-income KW - Nutrition assistance KW - Racial/ethnic disparities KW - Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program SP - 3377 EP - 3385 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 21 IS - 18 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The current study aimed to (i) describe racial/ethnic disparities in household food and beverage purchases among participants and non-participants in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and (ii) examine longitudinal associations between SNAP participation and purchases by race/ethnicity. DESIGN: To describe disparities, we estimated sociodemographic-adjusted mean purchases of seven unhealthy food and beverage groups (e.g. junk food, sugar-sweetened beverages) and four nutrients (e.g. sugar, Na) among white, black and Hispanic SNAP-participating and non-participating households. To examine longitudinal associations, we used multivariable linear regression with household fixed effects. SETTING: USA, 2010-2014. SUBJECTS: Food and beverage purchases among low-income (≤250 % federal poverty line) US households (n 30 403) participating in the Nielsen Homescan Panel. RESULTS: Among non-participants, there were significant black-white disparities (i.e. differences favouring white households) in households' adjusted mean purchases of processed meat, sweeteners, sugar-sweetened beverages, energy and Na. These disparities persisted among SNAP participants. In contrast, the only significant Hispanic-white disparity among non-participants was for Na purchases; this disparity was reduced in magnitude and no longer significant among SNAP-participating households. Additionally, Hispanic households purchased less energy from junk foods than white households, regardless of SNAP status. In longitudinal models accounting for household fixed effects, SNAP participation was associated with increased energy purchased among black households. No other significant longitudinal associations between SNAP and purchase outcomes were observed. CONCLUSIONS: SNAP may not be meeting its potential to improve food and beverage purchases or reduce disparities. Research is needed to identify strategies for ensuring nutritious purchases across all racial/ethnic groups. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30305190/Supplemental_Nutrition_Assistance_Program_participation_and_racial/ethnic_disparities_in_food_and_beverage_purchases_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980018002598/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -