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Psychiatric and Substance Use Comorbidity in Treatment-Seeking Injection Opioid Users Referred From Syringe Exchange.
J Dual Diagn. 2018 Oct-Dec; 14(4):193-200.JD

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The present study evaluated rates of co-occurring current psychiatric and substance use disorders in a sample of opioid-dependent treatment-seeking injection drug users referred from syringe exchange.

METHODS

Participants (N = 208) completed the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) IV-R to assess current (within the past year) psychiatric and substance use disorders and the two most commonly diagnosed personality disorders (antisocial and borderline personality disorders).

RESULTS

Forty-eight percent of the sample had a current Axis I psychiatric disorder, and 67% had a co-occurring current substance use disorder. Posttraumatic stress disorder (21%), major depression (17%), and bipolar I (12%) were the most prevalent Axis I psychiatric disorders, and cocaine use disorder (53%) was the most commonly co-occurring substance use disorder. Women were more likely to have diagnoses of most anxiety disorders and less likely to have diagnoses of alcohol use disorder or antisocial personality disorder. The presence of a personality disorder was associated with higher rates of cocaine and sedative use disorder.

CONCLUSIONS

Findings suggest the importance of evaluating and treating co-occurring psychiatric and substance use disorders in the treatment of injection drug users with opioid dependence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Addiction Treatment Services-BBRC, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center , Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine , Baltimore , MD , USA.a Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Addiction Treatment Services-BBRC, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center , Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine , Baltimore , MD , USA.a Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Addiction Treatment Services-BBRC, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center , Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine , Baltimore , MD , USA.a Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Addiction Treatment Services-BBRC, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center , Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine , Baltimore , MD , USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30332349

Citation

Kidorf, Michael, et al. "Psychiatric and Substance Use Comorbidity in Treatment-Seeking Injection Opioid Users Referred From Syringe Exchange." Journal of Dual Diagnosis, vol. 14, no. 4, 2018, pp. 193-200.
Kidorf M, Solazzo S, Yan H, et al. Psychiatric and Substance Use Comorbidity in Treatment-Seeking Injection Opioid Users Referred From Syringe Exchange. J Dual Diagn. 2018;14(4):193-200.
Kidorf, M., Solazzo, S., Yan, H., & Brooner, R. K. (2018). Psychiatric and Substance Use Comorbidity in Treatment-Seeking Injection Opioid Users Referred From Syringe Exchange. Journal of Dual Diagnosis, 14(4), 193-200. https://doi.org/10.1080/15504263.2018.1510148
Kidorf M, et al. Psychiatric and Substance Use Comorbidity in Treatment-Seeking Injection Opioid Users Referred From Syringe Exchange. J Dual Diagn. 2018 Oct-Dec;14(4):193-200. PubMed PMID: 30332349.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychiatric and Substance Use Comorbidity in Treatment-Seeking Injection Opioid Users Referred From Syringe Exchange. AU - Kidorf,Michael, AU - Solazzo,Stephanie, AU - Yan,Haijuan, AU - Brooner,Robert K, Y1 - 2018/10/17/ PY - 2018/10/18/pubmed PY - 2019/9/24/medline PY - 2018/10/18/entrez KW - agonist treatment KW - gender KW - opioid dependence KW - syringe exchange SP - 193 EP - 200 JF - Journal of dual diagnosis JO - J Dual Diagn VL - 14 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The present study evaluated rates of co-occurring current psychiatric and substance use disorders in a sample of opioid-dependent treatment-seeking injection drug users referred from syringe exchange. METHODS: Participants (N = 208) completed the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) IV-R to assess current (within the past year) psychiatric and substance use disorders and the two most commonly diagnosed personality disorders (antisocial and borderline personality disorders). RESULTS: Forty-eight percent of the sample had a current Axis I psychiatric disorder, and 67% had a co-occurring current substance use disorder. Posttraumatic stress disorder (21%), major depression (17%), and bipolar I (12%) were the most prevalent Axis I psychiatric disorders, and cocaine use disorder (53%) was the most commonly co-occurring substance use disorder. Women were more likely to have diagnoses of most anxiety disorders and less likely to have diagnoses of alcohol use disorder or antisocial personality disorder. The presence of a personality disorder was associated with higher rates of cocaine and sedative use disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest the importance of evaluating and treating co-occurring psychiatric and substance use disorders in the treatment of injection drug users with opioid dependence. SN - 1550-4271 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30332349/Psychiatric_and_Substance_Use_Comorbidity_in_Treatment_Seeking_Injection_Opioid_Users_Referred_From_Syringe_Exchange_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15504263.2018.1510148 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -